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Awful, awful children's books - Page 15

post #281 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
Are kids embarrassed about pooping and farting? Mine seem to think it's a super special talent they must share with the world.
: And for my kids, add belching to the list.


post #282 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by momileigh View Post
Going back to the OP, no, I don't think this thread was supposed to be about "books that suck to us." And I don't think it was meant to be a "silly thread" as you categorized it. It started out looking at reasons why classic children's books might have morals or messages that don't fit with people's values today. The concerns were legitimate and the responses were often thoughtful. I doubt it was meant to degenerate into, "Oh, and So-and-So SUCKS because I personally don't like rhyming!" Honestly the thing that turned me off the most about your posts is that you said that an individual sucked. Not her books, but herself. That's just not cool.

Oh, and NYCVeg... no, that wasn't me talking about censorship. And I don't have a problem with everyone having their own tastes, but I hate for books to be labeled "awful" or "sucky" in a legitimate reasonable conversation just because they aren't something you personally enjoy. It is terribly juvenile. Now, give a REASON why they may be unacceptable (the wrong message for kids, violence, underlying racism, very scary, commercialistic, etc) and that's a true addition to the dialogue. The person who had issues w/ Pajama Time and the warthog, for instance, although I feel she was reading too much into it, had a legitimate concern. "Boynton sucks" is not, IMO, a legitimate concern, nor is it a valuable addition to any adult conversation.



jumping in...

i read anything i could get my hands on as a kid. when i look back at what i was reading, there were hundreds of wrong messages, rascist, sexist, violent, etc. trixie beldon, nancy drew, peter rabbit, "be good or you will get beaten" disturbing fairy tales, etc.

and honestly, here i am, a grownup, who considers herself a feminist, hates rascism, sexism, gender stereotypes, tries to be respectful of my kids etc.

those books didn't MAKE me feel like those negative viewpoints were good to copy. and i wasnt really reading them with a discerning mind either.

we all read all those so called awful awful books and yet here we are, NOT living like that. they can't be THAT influential, dangerous, harmful.

that being said, i have definate dislikes for my own kids' books. i hate those smarmy berenstein bears, those sickly sweet care bears, those brain dumbing dora/disney/bob the builder crap books. and we are lucky enough here lately to have dozens of hand me down captain underpants, spongebob, lizzie mcguire, and mary-kate and ashley books. ugh ugh ugh. give me good old peter rabbit even though he gets whipped, ANYday.

and the robert munsch thing, i used to think love you forever was a bit creepy, then i found out it's written for his still born children, and now i think it's very poigniant. and he lets first nations' groups translate his books at no cost. which i think is pretty cool. you can download any of his stories from his website for free. and he'll write back if your kids write to him. sent us a little package with a picture, a couple of mini books signed, and a copy of a short unpublished story. very sweet!
post #283 of 333
I don't know if anyone has mentioned this book, but when I was little, I heard probably one of the most terrifying children's books ever. It's called Lon Po Po. It's the Chinese adaptation of Little Red Riding Hood. The mother leaves the three girls at home alone while she goes to visit the grandma on her birthday. It's dusk and she still hasn't come back. A wolf comes to the house pretending to be the grandma. At first, they believe the wolf. They let him in, he immediately blows out the candle, and they all go into the bed to go to sleep. One of the girls relights the candle and she sees his hairy face. They decide to take the wolf outside and they trick him into going up in a basket into a ginko tree by saying that eating the ginko nuts will make him immortal. Then they slam the basket with the wolf in it into the ground until he dies of a broken heart. The story and the illustrations are pretty disturbing. This book actually won the Caldecott Award. I *might* read this book to Jamie when he's MUCH older, not sure how much older though, and it can start a conversation about how pedophiles try to trick children into letting them into their lives and how these girls did what they could to prevent being preyed upon. It's so scary for a little child, though. I heard it when I was still in elementary school and it scared me so much. He'd have to at least be in middle school before I'd consider telling him about the book.
post #284 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by mojomom View Post
I do not like Curious George. He NEVER listens, but always manages to get out of it. Not a good message IMO.I actually have one of dh's old Curious george books. The story is about george going to a hospital. He gets into a bottle of Ether and they illustrate him getting high. Needless to say it is safely tucked away in our trunk.
hell yeah. go george...
post #285 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by karliyanchus View Post
jumping in...

i read anything i could get my hands on as a kid. when i look back at what i was reading, there were hundreds of wrong messages, rascist, sexist, violent, etc. trixie beldon, nancy drew, peter rabbit, "be good or you will get beaten" disturbing fairy tales, etc.

and honestly, here i am, a grownup, who considers herself a feminist, hates rascism, sexism, gender stereotypes, tries to be respectful of my kids etc.

those books didn't MAKE me feel like those negative viewpoints were good to copy. and i wasnt really reading them with a discerning mind either.

we all read all those so called awful awful books and yet here we are, NOT living like that. they can't be THAT influential, dangerous, harmful.

that being said, i have definate dislikes for my own kids' books. i hate those smarmy berenstein bears, those sickly sweet care bears, those brain dumbing dora/disney/bob the builder crap books. and we are lucky enough here lately to have dozens of hand me down captain underpants, spongebob, lizzie mcguire, and mary-kate and ashley books. ugh ugh ugh. give me good old peter rabbit even though he gets whipped, ANYday.

and the robert munsch thing, i used to think love you forever was a bit creepy, then i found out it's written for his still born children, and now i think it's very poigniant. and he lets first nations' groups translate his books at no cost. which i think is pretty cool. you can download any of his stories from his website for free. and he'll write back if your kids write to him. sent us a little package with a picture, a couple of mini books signed, and a copy of a short unpublished story. very sweet!
great post...
post #286 of 333
I've really enjoyed where this thread has gone. My daughter is three, and lots of the books listed here I've avoided. This thread has helped me clarify in my own mind that I don't want to avoid them forever - just until she's older and I can discuss them with her.

I think karliyanchus had great points. I want to teach my dd to think critically, not censor her experiences.
post #287 of 333
......
post #288 of 333
I saw the earlier post. The background of the pictures in the story were very pretty, actually. The same style of artwork in another, more light-hearted story would have been, IMO, more worthy of an award. It's just that this disturbing book got an award at all that's surprising to me. It was the pictures of the wolf and when they dropped the basket that were disturbing, for the most part. I want to read this story again. I haven't read it since I was in elementary school. I was reminded of it when someone mentioned the True Story of the Three Pigs book because that story was in the same library as Lon Po Po and was read to us by the same school librarian.
post #289 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by annettemarie View Post
Are kids embarrassed about pooping and farting? Mine seem to think it's a super special talent they must share with the world.


Er..*some* kids are embarrassed about pooping and farting.

post #290 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by mojomom View Post
I do not like Curious George. He NEVER listens, but always manages to get out of it. Not a good message IMO.I actually have one of dh's old Curious george books. The story is about george going to a hospital. He gets into a bottle of Ether and they illustrate him getting high. Needless to say it is safely tucked away in our trunk.


I bet that one is a collector's item.
post #291 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by acannon View Post
I don't know if anyone has mentioned this book, but when I was little, I heard probably one of the most terrifying children's books ever. It's called Lon Po Po. It's the Chinese adaptation of Little Red Riding Hood. The mother leaves the three girls at home alone while she goes to visit the grandma on her birthday. It's dusk and she still hasn't come back. A wolf comes to the house pretending to be the grandma. At first, they believe the wolf. They let him in, he immediately blows out the candle, and they all go into the bed to go to sleep. One of the girls relights the candle and she sees his hairy face. They decide to take the wolf outside and they trick him into going up in a basket into a ginko tree by saying that eating the ginko nuts will make him immortal. Then they slam the basket with the wolf in it into the ground until he dies of a broken heart. The story and the illustrations are pretty disturbing. This book actually won the Caldecott Award. I *might* read this book to Jamie when he's MUCH older, not sure how much older though, and it can start a conversation about how pedophiles try to trick children into letting them into their lives and how these girls did what they could to prevent being preyed upon. It's so scary for a little child, though. I heard it when I was still in elementary school and it scared me so much. He'd have to at least be in middle school before I'd consider telling him about the book.

My son brought this book home is 3rd grade and it became my then 2.5 year old DD's favorite bedtime story. She's almost 5 now and still loves it. I found the artwork to be beautiful and scary at all the right spots. o, it obviously doesn't scare all kids!
post #292 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by ananas View Post
Oh, also, I'm wondering if some of the same ones here choosing not to read certain words and throwing away certain books are the same ones who oppose banning children's books in libraries. Just curious.
Why would that matter? Do you think that they should object to everyone else having a book in their own homes? Oh, wait,: you're trying to say that it would be hypocritical to make a choice about a book and then let other people make their own choices about the book.

Freedom of speech protects my right to call something worthless tripe just as much as it protects other people's rights to produce worthless tripe.
post #293 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofiabugmom View Post
I remember reading one of the older Curious George books, thankfully before I read it to DD, and after Curious George had made a mistake, he "wished he was dead".

Not a message I want to give to my kid, thanks.

I have read all the original Curious George stories recently and this was not in any of them.
post #294 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by mojomom View Post
I do not like Curious George. He NEVER listens, but always manages to get out of it. Not a good message IMO.I actually have one of dh's old Curious george books. The story is about george going to a hospital. He gets into a bottle of Ether and they illustrate him getting high. Needless to say it is safely tucked away in our trunk.
I would never ever read that version to dd when she was a toddler, but now I want one!
post #295 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by fridgeart View Post
I remembered what else it is that I hate about the Love you forever book, aside from the mom-stalking-the-adult-son (which I know is just a metaphor, but still), the ARTWORK. It is atrocious. The perspective is all wonky and the proportions really bother me-they either need to be way better or way more deliberate in their distortion. Bleh.
I am still in the process of reading this [very large!!!] thread but my sister got this book for my son David and I said to my boyfriend, "Dude! Some MDC people are saying that this book is super creepy!" So after David unlatched I went in the closet and got it and read it out loud because my boyfriend asked for a bedtime story, haha. Some parts were weird, yeah. I decided to add in a line when she sneaks into her teenage son's bedroom. It says something like, "The mother looked over her teenage son's bed," [my line added was, "And saw a bunch of used Kleenex," which got tons of laughter from my boyfriend. We are mature.] Then I showed him a picture of the teenage son's room, pointed at what looked to be an ancient computer and asked my boyfriend [who knows all about computers], "What kind of computer is that?" He said, "None of the above. Looks like his mom bought him the fake plastic one that comes with model homes."

That book creeped me out, especially the drawing of the mom's car with the ladder over top of her car, hahaha. But my boyfriend said, "Aw yeah it's kinda weird but wouldn't you want to hear that stuff if you were 3?" And yeah I guess maybe so.

*Reads more thread*
post #296 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by karliyanchus View Post
jumping in...

i read anything i could get my hands on as a kid. when i look back at what i was reading, there were hundreds of wrong messages, rascist, sexist, violent, etc. trixie beldon, nancy drew, peter rabbit, "be good or you will get beaten" disturbing fairy tales, etc.

and honestly, here i am, a grownup, who considers herself a feminist, hates rascism, sexism, gender stereotypes, tries to be respectful of my kids etc.

those books didn't MAKE me feel like those negative viewpoints were good to copy. and i wasnt really reading them with a discerning mind either.

we all read all those so called awful awful books and yet here we are, NOT living like that. they can't be THAT influential, dangerous, harmful.

that being said, i have definate dislikes for my own kids' books. i hate those smarmy berenstein bears, those sickly sweet care bears, those brain dumbing dora/disney/bob the builder crap books. and we are lucky enough here lately to have dozens of hand me down captain underpants, spongebob, lizzie mcguire, and mary-kate and ashley books. ugh ugh ugh. give me good old peter rabbit even though he gets whipped, ANYday.

and the robert munsch thing, i used to think love you forever was a bit creepy, then i found out it's written for his still born children, and now i think it's very poigniant. and he lets first nations' groups translate his books at no cost. which i think is pretty cool. you can download any of his stories from his website for free. and he'll write back if your kids write to him. sent us a little package with a picture, a couple of mini books signed, and a copy of a short unpublished story. very sweet!


I loved Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden as a child. I thought they were so lucky to have all those adventures. ND had her own car (I could only wish!) and Trixie got to ride all her rich friend's horses (again, I could only wish, that would have been my dream come true). They had exciting things happen every day, where my life was pretty much same in same out every day. I did think ND was a bit froofy, what with her matching shoes and handbags; I mean, who really cares what she was wearing and whether or not it matched (I was a tomboy through and through, lol). And I thought some things should just be obvious to her, that if she paid attention better, she would have stayed out of some scrapes. Still, I did admire her adventures.

I would rather my DC (boys and girls) read ND, TB, and Hardy Boys than the Lizzie McGuire, SpongeBob, and Captain Underpants variety of books any day of the week. I think this stuff is just worthless.
post #297 of 333
Oh, I think Captain Underpants is pretty clever, actually. I mean, it's waaay too gross for me -- DD has to read them to herself because they make me queasy -- but they use some impressive vocabulary and there are lots of plays on words, parodies of literary and film conventions, etc. It ain't Dostoevsky, but for 7-9 year olds they're reasonably sophisticated stuff -- far beyond a Lizzie McGuire TV novelization, for sure!
post #298 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by straighthaircurly View Post
I have read all the original Curious George stories recently and this was not in any of them.
Yes it is..."Curious George Gets a Medal"
We got rid of it...

here is a link to the page http://books.google.com/books?id=-tR...tCBzSEzM&hl=en
post #299 of 333
My dd (and I) love Curious George! Those books are funny. There is one where George unwinds by relaxing in a chair with a pipe. Dd always points that out and we laugh at that picture.

she's 4 and she thinks smoking is gross and smelly and knows it's unhealthy. She believes monkeys belong in nature and not the city or the zoo. But she also is able to laugh at the absurdity in those books.

I think it's perfectly OK to use books as a jumping off point for discussions, that seeing CG with ether won't turn our children into drug addicts.

We also LOVE Ping, and I've never really interpreted the spanking the last duck gets as anything like a punishment. The book is disturbing though, the parts with the other birds with the rings around their necks is sad and dd had a lot of questions about that.
post #300 of 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by gardenmommy View Post
I loved Nancy Drew and Trixie Belden as a child. I thought they were so lucky to have all those adventures. ND had her own car (I could only wish!) and Trixie got to ride all her rich friend's horses (again, I could only wish, that would have been my dream come true). They had exciting things happen every day, where my life was pretty much same in same out every day. I did think ND was a bit froofy, what with her matching shoes and handbags; I mean, who really cares what she was wearing and whether or not it matched (I was a tomboy through and through, lol). And I thought some things should just be obvious to her, that if she paid attention better, she would have stayed out of some scrapes. Still, I did admire her adventures.

I would rather my DC (boys and girls) read ND, TB, and Hardy Boys than the Lizzie McGuire, SpongeBob, and Captain Underpants variety of books any day of the week. I think this stuff is just worthless.

i know! i loved trixie beldon for those reasons exactly. hanging out in both clubhouses and mansions! riding horses! mysteries! oh to be her. and she wasn't perfy perfy like nancy drew, she blurted stuff out and got into trouble so often....

i've been thinking of reading a couple of old books to my kids, i don't know when the time will be right. both stories are kinda brutal, but i loved them myself as a kid, so i don't know. i think they do teach empathy, through pulling on your heart strings. black beauty and call of the wild. we tried black stallion and it was ok till they got rescued and then it was sort of slow, so we lost interest.
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