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You know what you NEVER see? (Re: Baby Names and Trendiness) - Page 6

post #101 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSMama View Post
I'm a Vanessa, born in the 70's...although I liked my name I always felt shortchanged in that I couldn't ever find pencils or anything with my name on them like the other Jennifers and Michelles I went to school with. My mom felt bad about it and to this day will occasionally pick up things with my name on them to compensate, lol!

My DD is a Georgia and seems to be the only one I've run into so far...I'm sure it won't be the case as she gets older though. We have a Jessica down the street and I think it's still a classic name...we're considering Rachael for our next one if she's a girl.

I went to highschool with a Misty Hill...

lol, i still buy ashley stuff sometimes because i could never find it growing up- everything was always sold out

eta- i have a friend with a 1yr old jorja, and georgie was a name we were considering for a girl when i was pregnant with ds- until we learned we'd be in georgia when the baby was born, lol
post #102 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inci View Post

I live in an artsy, green, hippie-ish town/know a lot of such people and thus know (or know of) young children named things like Sequoia, Wolf, River, Sage, Harvest, Zola, Ocean, Leaf, etc.
I kind of think giving your kid a non-name is kind of limiting to the child. It's pressing your own vision/values on the child, and what if the child grows up to not possess the same vision/values? Can you imagine an investment banker named Ocean? Or a Senator Sequoia?

I know this is an unpopular opinion on MDC.

I named my son Michael Robert. Haven't met any other Michaels his age. I don't know where they live, but not in my town, which is littered with Henrys, Aidans, and Silases.
post #103 of 156
I recently met someone who told a story about her frined "Earth Dancer". We also live in one of those hippy enclaves, but I was surprised the story teller could keep a straight face while repeating this woman's name throughout her story. Earth Dancer named her kids Spring and Rupert. Later than evening my husband and I had a conversation about what was worse: that this woman's parents gave her such a laden name, or that she chose it for herself in adulthood. I'm as crunchy as the rest of you, but would not give my kid a name that so obviously tagged her to this place and community. It should be her choice, and she should be able to escape my choices without obvious marks. However, the common-to-our-community practice of adopting a far out name, sheading you're birth name and turning your back on your past... seems a little pretentious to me. We are all products of the course of our lives. Isn't changing you name (and I dont mean adopting a nick-name or lengthing or shortening your name, choosing to use your middle name, or changing your last name to match your family) a denigal of who you are?
We decided the best situation possible is that Earth Dancer's parents gave her that as a middle name, giving her the (hidden) option of an authentic far-out hippy name should she grow to want to use it.

There are bunches of parents I meet who are unhappy their kid's name is in the top dozen of her or his birth year. In our play group there are a whole variety of Sophie/Sophia/Zophya's and Eva/Ava/Eve's as well as Aiden's and Owen's. It took birthing and naming a child to realise that my friends' Moms might have thought Jennifer Katlyn and Ryan were originals. Today, however, with google everywhere, there's no excuse to be surpised.

ps- Our daughter is named Auna Miriam. Auna sounds like Fauna or Sauna. Miriam is so I can call her Mimms as a nickname. I nearly named her Terran, as in Terrance without the last consenant sound. To me it sounds pretty and means "person of the earth" like Canadian means "person of Canada". It also shortens to Ren which I think is rather cute.
post #104 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcgrl View Post
I kind of think giving your kid a non-name is kind of limiting to the child. It's pressing your own vision/values on the child, and what if the child grows up to not possess the same vision/values? Can you imagine an investment banker named Ocean? Or a Senator Sequoia?

I know this is an unpopular opinion on MDC.

I named my son Michael Robert. Haven't met any other Michaels his age. I don't know where they live, but not in my town, which is littered with Henrys, Aidans, and Silases.
I see this to an extent, but everything is putting your values on a child. Michael Robert is putting your values as much as Sequoia is... mind you they are values that will be more likely to fly under the radar in the culture. I did a poll here on who liked/disliked their common vs. uncommon names awhile back, and a lot of people were dissatisfied with common or popular names.

I think super out there, non-names or kree8tive made up weirdly spelled names are over the top. But I also think it's okay to give a more rare or odd name, at least as much as it is to give a common or popular name.
post #105 of 156
I am hearing a lot of Sophias (and their variations), Jadens (and all their variations for either gender), Michaelas (and all their variations), Caitlins (and all their variations) and Victoria Isabellas.
If this one is a little girl I would like the name Jadis I admit....(C.S. Lewis fans may recognize it), but dh hates it (and any other name I've come up with). I met a girl when I was younger named D'arcy, and I thought that was a neat way to spell it...it's another one I would like.
post #106 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcgrl View Post
I kind of think giving your kid a non-name is kind of limiting to the child. It's pressing your own vision/values on the child, and what if the child grows up to not possess the same vision/values? Can you imagine an investment banker named Ocean? Or a Senator Sequoia?

I know this is an unpopular opinion on MDC.

I named my son Michael Robert. Haven't met any other Michaels his age. I don't know where they live, but not in my town, which is littered with Henrys, Aidans, and Silases.
I agree with a PP that any name--including Michael Robert--is a value judgment. I know a man who was given a very traditional name, much like your ds's. He now conducts New Age spiritual tours out in New Mexico and changed his name (first and last) to something much like the so-called "non-names" you listed above. How is this different than an investment banker or senator changing his own name to "fit" his profession? What if your son decides to become an eco-warrior in the Amazon and hates that he was saddled with stodgy old Michael Robert? (I don't, BTW, think Michael is really a stodgy name--it's one of my favorite boys' names--I'm just making a point). OTOH, you might be surprised--I know a few people with "hippy" names in very traditional fields, and it's really not that big a deal. And, hey, no one ever thought we'd have a viable presidential candidate (and possibly a president) named Barack Obama, either.
post #107 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by thefragile7393 View Post
I am hearing a lot of Sophias (and their variations), Jadens (and all their variations for either gender), Michaelas (and all their variations), Caitlins (and all their variations) and Victoria Isabellas.
If this one is a little girl I would like the name Jadis I admit....(C.S. Lewis fans may recognize it), but dh hates it (and any other name I've come up with). I met a girl when I was younger named D'arcy, and I thought that was a neat way to spell it...it's another one I would like.
oh, i like jadis! even though she was evile.

there are tons of names that end in S that i like, but our last name starts with S, so it sounds funny.
post #108 of 156
This thread has made me giggle because I have(as you can see in my sig) a Henry, Charlie and a George....

I don't think much of trendiness or popularity with my kids names, more how they sound and that there are no others with that name in my town(very small town). My kids all named the next kids, to be honest..I just find the name thing to be kid of trivial... isn't that wierd?
post #109 of 156
I do know a little Nancy, and she's the only little Nancy I've ever met. Stands out because it's not a "weird name," it's just unusual in this generation of toddlers.

I think our kids' names fit pretty well with the trend you described. Oh well.
post #110 of 156
My son is Seamus and its funny that in Ireland this is a very very common name, but here (esp where we live), not so much. I think we've met only one or two other Seamuses in the past 11 yrs. And he is always the only Seamus in his school, and i think the only one in our city. He definitely stands out, but in a good way. And to top it off, he was named before he was conceived, and yet came out looking exactly how you'd expect a "Seamus" to look (both his father and i have dark hair and werent expecting this redheaded little baby!)


Katherine
post #111 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hannahsmummy View Post
Talking about being one of many, I am Michelle and in the 70's half of my class was called Michelle. When i was in the 5th grade, there were 5 of us.
My little girl is Michelle. Named partly just because we liked it, and partly because my sister's middle name is Michelle. Great name!
post #112 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by _betsy_ View Post
I just met a baby Heather, and I thought that while there were a million Heathers when I was growing up, I hadn't heard of a new baby Heather in a long time. She'll likely be the only one in her class.
My dd's name is Heather. She's 2yo.
post #113 of 156
I'm a Kathryn and I was born in the 80's. When I was 4 or 5 I hated it. I wanted to be a Jennifer, Jessica, Melissa,Megan, or Ashley like many of the other girls I knew. Then when I was around 8, I hated it because it was too common, I wanted to have a really unique name that no one else had. Now I'm an adult and I love it. I'm glad I have a name with a lot of cute nicknames to choose from that's not "stuck" in any decade or era. I feel like it's really "Classic" and will never go out of style. So thanks Mom and Dad.
My sister on the other hand is a Kristyn, which is firmly planted in the 70'd/80's, but she liked her name too (mostly because of the "y" spelling, though she hated never being able to find name stuff as a kid).

I work with children and have definitely picked up on the "trendy" names around here.
I once had a pre-school class with 3 /5 girls named Emma.
Emma, Sophia, and Lily are huge. For boys I haven't noticed anything super trendy other than loooong bible names ending in "ah" or "iah" and it seems like every other baby being born is an Aiden (Please know I think these are all nice names though).
post #114 of 156
i was actually considering Lisa or Laurie if ds2 had been a girl for that very reason, but decided to save those names for my as-yet-unconceived dgd so she can be the cutting edge of trendiness.
post #115 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by nermal View Post
I nearly named her Terran, as in Terrance without the last consenant sound. To me it sounds pretty and means "person of the earth" like Canadian means "person of Canada". It also shortens to Ren which I think is rather cute.
I call my 22 yo sister "Ren" all the time; her name is Lauren (Elizabeth).

I hated having a popular name growing up and it still feels kind of generic to me (I'm another Jennifer). In 5th grade, I ahd to be "Jennifer M-A" because there was another Jennifer M in my class. : I hated when someone would call my house and ask for me like that, ugh. I made it a point as a teacher to just call the student by their first name and be sure to be looking at them when I said it, no initials required.

My mom also swears that she had no idea how popular my name was when she named me (after a little girl that had been in her class). I was born in 1978 and you would think she would have come across more of us by then. My dad gave me my middle name though and I it because he gave it to me and it's unique without being out there~ Celeste.
post #116 of 156
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post #117 of 156
I am a Karyn, also not a popular name anymore. I was thinking about this thread just this morning and remembered I had a couple of "Mindys" in my class, as well as lots of Melissas and Kristins. I even knew some Marys and Leslies. All names I wouldn't expect to see on a baby today. I would have named a girl Kathryn, but my mom's name is Katherine. And I know someone with a 4 month old named Amy. It was a suprising choice to me, since it's not one you see anymore.

My boys are Evan, Liam and Colin -- definitely following the Celtic "trend" these days.

Karyn
post #118 of 156
I don't see too many Nicholes anymore either.
post #119 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by musikat View Post
I am a Karyn, also not a popular name anymore. I was thinking about this thread just this morning and remembered I had a couple of "Mindys" in my class, as well as lots of Melissas and Kristins. I even knew some Marys and Leslies. All names I wouldn't expect to see on a baby today. I would have named a girl Kathryn, but my mom's name is Katherine. And I know someone with a 4 month old named Amy. It was a suprising choice to me, since it's not one you see anymore.

My boys are Evan, Liam and Colin -- definitely following the Celtic "trend" these days.

Karyn
This thread actually reminds me of my reaction to the movie version of Bridge to Terebithia that came out last year. I couldn't get past the fact that they decided to have it take place in the present time, but the kids still had the popular 70's names like Janice, Joyce, and Leslie, which though not impossible, is highly unlikely. I'm sure it's just because I'm a huge "name nerd" though. I wish the movie had taken place in the 70's, but since it didn't I'm glad they didn't re-name the characters.
I had a similar reaction to the graphic novel versions of The Babysitter's Club that were made to take place in the present (I know the artist really wanted them to take place in the 80's still but the publisher said no), you're probably not going to find too many Stacey's, Mallory's and Kristy's born today, but those names are still a little less trendy than the ones in the previous example.
I could talk about naming trends all day! I actually love a lot of the names from the 40s, 50s, 60's and 70's, Roxanna is one of our top girl names, I also like Dawn, Maureen, Janis, to think of a few. The 80s though, like many people have said, still feels too close for comfort.
post #120 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by GSMama View Post

My DD is a Georgia and seems to be the only one I've run into so far...I'm sure it won't be the case as she gets older though. We have a Jessica down the street and I think it's still a classic name...we're considering Rachael for our next one if she's a girl.
I only met one other Georgia in my lifetime, I thought that was a very pretty name though
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