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post #61 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by talk de jour View Post
I'm a Lindsay, and I can't say that I've met a single Lindsay any younger than about-to-graduate-high-school.

Although I was quite often one of many Lindsay/Lindsey/Lyndsey/Lindsys in the same class.
My older DD is a Courtney. We had Lindsay on the list for dd2, but I decided to buck the trend of "names DH thought were cool when he was in high school".

DS, my stepson, is a Michael who has now given in to the pressure of friends who want to call him Mike. DH named him as well...........Michael Anthony, after the bass player from Van Halen. All I can say is that *I didn't have input in that one.

I finally won the naming battle with DD2, Ellison Violet. My mom begged me to name her after her, but I couldn't bear to saddle the poor girl with Pamela.
post #62 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Needle in the Hay View Post
It's possible our parents didn't realize just how popular those names were when they gave them to us!
Mine sure didn't, they thought Jessica was a rare name! It went on to be the single most popular name across two decades.

I think there must be something in the popular culture that's not totally in our faces but still helps nudge many of us toward certain names. People think that Friends was responsible for the Emma boom, but really that boom was already underway before Ross and Rachael named their daughter. What suddenly made thousands of parents long to name their daughters Emma? Was it the sudden Jane Austen craze, or did the JA craze come from the same place that our lust for Emma, Ella, Stella, Isabella, etc is coming from? It's wild.
post #63 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by bri276 View Post
I heard a mom calling "Amanda!" at the playground the other day and I couldn't believe it. She was only 4 or 5.

I know a 6 yr old Amanda.

I have a Rachel, and I worry ti isn't popular enough. I odn't know anyone her age (alsmot 3) with that name. But I love it, and it suits her!

I'm Rebekah, and my great grandma didn't like that because it was "so old fashioned". That was in '74. Yeah, I've run into many people around my age with that name.
post #64 of 156
It just goes in cycles. I have no doubt that we'll have plenty of Jenifers and Cristys again.
post #65 of 156
Those names certainly aren't as popular but I don't think you can say we never see them. Many are still in the top 1000 popular names.

It is interesting how names become popular in cycles. Looking at the past 100 years, Jennifer started to become more popular as a name in the 50's and 60's and reached a peak in the 70's and early 80's. Mayber in another 50 years people will be using it more again to name their baby after Grandma Jennifer.

Naming a child Dave, Mike, or Kim has not been in the top 50 for at least the last 30 years in the US. David and Michael are still really popular (top 20).
post #66 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Qestia View Post
Have you seen this? http://babynamewizard.com/namevoyager/lnv0105.html you can see the trends in the form of a graph, jeffrey and jennifer definitely peaked in the 70s.

This site is really interesting. I put in 'Aubrey', a name I was considering for my daughter. Until the '70's it was used as a boy's name. And the name I really wanted, but my husband didn't care for - Leslie, was more popular than I realized.
post #67 of 156
Quote:
What suddenly made thousands of parents long to name their daughters Emma? Was it the sudden Jane Austen craze, or did the JA craze come from the same place that our lust for Emma, Ella, Stella, Isabella, etc is coming from? It's wild.
I think the latter. If I had to guess, I'd wager the majority of people who named their child Emma have not read or even heard of the book. I think it took off because it's a cute alternative to Emily, which is even more popular. And all the old ladies named Emma were people's great- or great-great-grandparents rather than direct grandparents they knew and associated the name with.

I really wonder where names are going to go 20 years from now. What wiill all the Noahs and Madisons be naming their kids?
post #68 of 156
I'm getting tired of the super-old-fashioned names for young children... I know so many children under the age of 8 named William, Charlie, Sophia, Henry, Joe, Lucy, Joseph, Grace, Hannah, Jack, Thomas, Owen, Dennis, Isabelle, etc.

I don't know many young children with 70s/80s/90s names, but I do know a couple Laurens, a Carly, a Leah, and a Kelly.

I live in an artsy, green, hippie-ish town/know a lot of such people and thus know (or know of) young children named things like Sequoia, Wolf, River, Sage, Harvest, Zola, Ocean, Leaf, etc.
post #69 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiddledebi View Post
Yeah, I was sadly "Little Debbie" as a kid, to differentiate me from the older Debbie in the next class up in Hebrew school. I even changed the spelling to Debi in high school just to be different! And then I was "short Debi" as a camp counsellor, being only 5' tall. Now I play in a band with a woman named Deborah, and people decided to call her Deb, which she hates, or "banjo Deb," which I imagine she hates even more.

That is why my daughters have "weird" uncommon names. I got tired of someone picking a random qualifier to go with my name! My Ronni (Veronica) and Sammi (Samara) are the only ones they know with those names. I'll bet Sammi runs into some Samanthas, but probably not too many Samaras. And we've only met one Veronica so far -- and none who go by Ronni. *whew*
I know a young Veronica.
post #70 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhisperV View Post
Hey!! My DD is Alexia too!!!
cool! I've come across a lot of Alexis but not Alexia
post #71 of 156
Funny how you used so many names from my family!

My sister is Melissa, my mom is Kim, my aunt is Julie, and my SIL is Tammy.

We considered Nancy for a girl's name... you don't hear that much anymore.
post #72 of 156
As a Lisa born in the 60s with a million other Lisa's, I realize how much we all got pummelled by that name. WAY too common. I heard a Mom at the park the other day calling "lisa" and almost chocked. NEVER met anyone under 30 with that name.. and then there was this little girl.. Turns out her parents are new immigrants to the US... never got to hear EVERY other little girl with my annoyingly common name.

It actually sounds CUTE for their daughter.. but I still don't like it for me... I always was ambivilent about my name.. felt like I should have been head cheerleader or something.

Yea, yea, I could always change it, but my Middle name stinks as well and I never found one taht seems to fit...
post #73 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by YesandNo View Post
I'm not immune. I just had a baby and most of the name that I considered were straight of the 1920s-1940s. But in the end I named her ...... DARCY. A name from my 1980s childhood. I bet she'll be the only one in her class!
*Sigh* I love Darcy, I'd totally name my third boy this, but DH has vetoed it. One of his favourite hockey players has that name and for some reason he doesn't want our child to have the same name. What a crumbum! But I only know of two people who have that name, one born in the 70's and one born in the 80's.
post #74 of 156
Both my boys have old fashioned names too. Alexander is getting popular, but Nelson is still one we've heard few and far between. My girl's names (please god, let me have one lol) will be Victoria and Elizabeth. I haven't met any Victoria's, but do know a little sweetie with Elisabeth.

I know lots of Owens, Xanders, Xaviers, Masons, Jacobs, Briannas (or some variation of it) McK's, Sophies, Olivias and Jacks. I do actually know a Wolf, he's more of a monkey than a wolf though.
post #75 of 156
im ashley, and you dont see that very often anymore, although there was an infant ashlee in my room when i worked at a daycare a couple years ago. its all ashlyn/ne now
post #76 of 156
Quote:
Jennifer started to become more popular as a name in the 50's and 60's and reached a peak in the 70's and early 80's.
That's for darn sure - I was born in '79 and I went to school with dozens of Jennifers, sometimes as many as six in one class.

Quote:
Quote:
What suddenly made thousands of parents long to name their daughters Emma? Was it the sudden Jane Austen craze, or did the JA craze come from the same place that our lust for Emma, Ella, Stella, Isabella, etc is coming from? It's wild.
I think the latter. If I had to guess, I'd wager the majority of people who named their child Emma have not read or even heard of the book. I think it took off because it's a cute alternative to Emily, which is even more popular. And all the old ladies named Emma were people's great- or great-great-grandparents rather than direct grandparents they knew and associated the name with.
I always planned on naming my daughter Emma after my great-grandmother (born 1907) and now that it's popular I probably won't, which makes me a little sad.

Quote:
I always was ambivilent about (Lisa).. felt like I should have been head cheerleader or something.
My nickname is Lisa, and the "head cheerleader" thing is always what I thought, too! Glad to know I'm not the only one.
post #77 of 156
I think a lot of the 70 and 80s names are making a comeback. jennifer is really starting to rise in popularity. I even cinsidered. My generation has avoided it like the plague so my dd wouldhave likely been the only Jennifer on the play ground. also Kathrine (but your right no cathies, just katies) Jeffy, Davey, Mary (large catholic population) Ashley, Hillary. Kimberly (kimmy).
post #78 of 156
My three year old is Jennifer, I never thought about it being not so popular I just liked it. I wanted to call her Heather or Hannah, they were also on the short list.
My 14yo has friends called Sammy (girl) Michelle, Katie, and all kinds of older popular names.
I've noticed quite a few Ethan and Ezra around here. Still lots of Tylers and Morgan and Logan's.
post #79 of 156
Ok, I have to know. Does anyone here know a Loki? That's DS2's name.
post #80 of 156
I have an Eleanor, we call her Ella these days. People usually dont think it s unusual until they see that she is not white. I think it might have something to do with the fact that they can never quite figure what ethnicity she is and are hoping for a clue from the name. They often assume that it was my grand-mother s name or something. I have also heard people say that it s a name for an old librarian lady.

At her daycare, there are 6 children, last year there was Mati, Mathias and Matthew. Matis is the number 1 name here for boys. William is also very popular.
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