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These kids are three and four years old.. - Page 4

post #61 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCVeg View Post
My SIL didn't try a strawberry until she was 26. She was turned off by all the little seeds on the outside--it wasn't that she was never offered them, she just never ate them. But I think a lot of it is parental influence. Dh's family really doesn't eat a lot fruit. His dad doesn't like it (at all) and has a phobia (no joke) of bananas. I'm actually not sure I've ever seen any fruit in their house. Or a fresh vegetable, for that matter. I think maybe they buy apples now and then. They're never short on 100-calorie-packs of different cookies and candies, though.
kids pick up on it when one or more parent won't eat (or enjoy eating) what they're being served.
post #62 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by GranoLLLy-girl View Post
I know this much, I wouldn't want them in a day care setting that looked down upon them because they wouldn't try a particular food or that they only wanted one thing day after day.
I agree -- and even if the provider's just looking down on the parent and not the child, it's still wrong.

OP -- I think it's great that you're committed to offering these children a wide variety of nutritious foods. But when you say things like: my daycare children don't like XYZ ... so guess what I'm serving for the next month? -- well, it just sounds like you're on some kind of a power-trip -- like it makes you feel you're better than the parents, if you get kids liking things they don't eat at home.

I know I used to get on these kinds of power-trips when I cared for other people's kids, before having my own. I liked the feeling that I was offering something "better" than what they got at home -- whether food-wise, or affection-wise, or whatever. But you know what -- I still wasn't their momma, the kids still knew who their mommas were, and it was so much healthier for me to get a life of my own and stop trying to be "better than" someone else.

Yes, caring for these children while their parents work is a wonderful vocation: I just wish you'd drop the patronizing attitude you seem to have toward these other parents (as I wish I had sooner). By the way, I have one child who's a choosy eater, and one who'll (currently) eat just about anything. Sometimes we have a varied diet with lots of fresh produce, and sometimes we have to focus on what can provide maximum sustenance for minimum cost.

To look at my varied eater and assume we must be wonderful parents and always offer a wide array of foods, or to look at my choosier child and assume we must be awful parents who only buy processed cr@p, is just going to be inaccurate anyway you slice it. I do think these kids are very lucky that you care about their nutrition, but they're not so lucky that you're slamming their parents.
post #63 of 243
Quote:
I know this much, I wouldn't want them in a day care setting that looked down upon them because they wouldn't try a particular food or that they only wanted one thing day after day.
I agree -- and even if the provider's just looking down on the parent and not the child, it's still wrong.

OP -- I think it's great that you're committed to offering these children a wide variety of nutritious foods. But when you say things like: my daycare children don't like XYZ ... so guess what I'm serving for the next month? -- well, it just sounds like you're on some kind of a power-trip -- like it makes you feel you're better than the parents, if you get kids liking things they don't eat at home.
I have to agree. If, when my kids were younger, their DCP had said similar sorts of stuff? I'd have found a new DCP. You don't KNOW their situation, financial or otherwise. It's great that you're trying to expand the children's palates. Buyt don't down their parents - because you really don't know what, how or why they raise their kids as they do.
post #64 of 243
I have a little boy here in daycare who tells me all the time that his parents don't feed him at home. Now my kids bring their lunches and this kids always has a stacked bag. But he was so consistent I decided to talk to his parents. They assured me he was eating (this kid is four years old and weighs more than 50lbs so it was obvious he was eating something somewhere) They then told me that he had been saying for some time now that I was giving his lunch to other kids. It was typically the kid whose lunch was most envied that day! Kids that age are not the best record keepers. Even if they have never eaten those fruits, do you think blasting the parents is going to magically get the kids to open up to watermelon? On average we eat probably a watermelon a week in the summer over here. My son will not touch the stuff. Sometimes people just don't like certain foods.
post #65 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
I know I used to get on these kinds of power-trips when I cared for other people's kids, before having with my own. I liked the feeling that I was offering something "better" than what they got at home -- whether food-wise, or affection-wise, or whatever. But you know what -- I still wasn't their momma, the kids still knew who their mommas were, and it was so much healthier for me to get a life of my own and stop trying to be "better than" someone else.
My mother does that all the time with her grandkids (including my kids).

Then she points out how happy the kids were when they did whatever it was. Her grandkids are happy to be with her because she's their grandmother. No matter what she does.
post #66 of 243
My 2.5yo is a veggie eater, however my 21 month old will only eat veggies if they are hidden in things, and even that can be a stretch. He'll pick the peppers and other vegetables off his pizza. Now, said 21mo loves fruit and will eat just about any kind of fruit that exists, but as far as green things are concerned we're just not there yet with him. I also wouldn't worry so much about the kids enjoying something to dip their vegetables in-at least the veggies are being consumed!
post #67 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by mistymama View Post
.. and I love to dip carrots, tomatoes and broccoli in ranch dressing. : My son likes them plain, but I still dip 'em all. I didn't know it was that big of a deal.
Yeah, really! I don't get the disdain about Ranch either ... just seems like a matter of personal preference to me.
post #68 of 243
what a sad sad commentary on our society.
post #69 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
I agree -- and even if the provider's just looking down on the parent and not the child, it's still wrong.

OP -- I think it's great that you're committed to offering these children a wide variety of nutritious foods. But when you say things like: my daycare children don't like XYZ ... so guess what I'm serving for the next month? -- well, it just sounds like you're on some kind of a power-trip -- like it makes you feel you're better than the parents, if you get kids liking things they don't eat at home.

I know I used to get on these kinds of power-trips when I cared for other people's kids, before having my own. I liked the feeling that I was offering something "better" than what they got at home -- whether food-wise, or affection-wise, or whatever. But you know what -- I still wasn't their momma, the kids still knew who their mommas were, and it was so much healthier for me to get a life of my own and stop trying to be "better than" someone else.

Yes, caring for these children while their parents work is a wonderful vocation: I just wish you'd drop the patronizing attitude you seem to have toward these other parents (as I wish I had sooner). By the way, I have one child who's a choosy eater, and one who'll (currently) eat just about anything. Sometimes we have a varied diet with lots of fresh produce, and sometimes we have to focus on what can provide maximum sustenance for minimum cost.

To look at my varied eater and assume we must be wonderful parents and always offer a wide array of foods, or to look at my choosier child and assume we must be awful parents who only buy processed cr@p, is just going to be inaccurate anyway you slice it. I do think these kids are very lucky that you care about their nutrition, but they're not so lucky that you're slamming their parents.

post #70 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammal_mama View Post
I agree -- and even if the provider's just looking down on the parent and not the child, it's still wrong.

OP -- I think it's great that you're committed to offering these children a wide variety of nutritious foods. But when you say things like: my daycare children don't like XYZ ... so guess what I'm serving for the next month? -- well, it just sounds like you're on some kind of a power-trip -- like it makes you feel you're better than the parents, if you get kids liking things they don't eat at home.

I know I used to get on these kinds of power-trips when I cared for other people's kids, before having my own. I liked the feeling that I was offering something "better" than what they got at home -- whether food-wise, or affection-wise, or whatever. But you know what -- I still wasn't their momma, the kids still knew who their mommas were, and it was so much healthier for me to get a life of my own and stop trying to be "better than" someone else.

Yes, caring for these children while their parents work is a wonderful vocation: I just wish you'd drop the patronizing attitude you seem to have toward these other parents (as I wish I had sooner). By the way, I have one child who's a choosy eater, and one who'll (currently) eat just about anything. Sometimes we have a varied diet with lots of fresh produce, and sometimes we have to focus on what can provide maximum sustenance for minimum cost.

To look at my varied eater and assume we must be wonderful parents and always offer a wide array of foods, or to look at my choosier child and assume we must be awful parents who only buy processed cr@p, is just going to be inaccurate anyway you slice it. I do think these kids are very lucky that you care about their nutrition, but they're not so lucky that you're slamming their parents.

I love, love, love your posts, Mamal Mama. I've been meaning to pm you that for a while, but why not make it public knowledge?

To the OP, I think your heart is in the right place, but after reading several judgmental food threads on MDC today, I have to say that you are making some offensive assumptions here. If my child would eat raw carrots swimming in ranch dressing, I'd jump up and down and do the hula. If I could consistently get her to eat any vegetable by using ranch dressing, you'd bet I'd serve it at every meal. I was thrilled the other day when she ate a piece of watermelon. Kiwi? Strawberries? Blackberries? Raspberries? She'd never touch them. I've tried. I get so frustrated with the people on MDC who pull out the, "Well my child was first fed on fruits and vegetables, so I know s/he will develop good eating habits" kind of attitude, as if those of us with picky eaters must have missed that memo. Some of us, in spite of our knowlege of nutrition, in spite of all of our creativity in serving healthy food, in spite of every effort we can muster to get our children to love natural foods, have picky eaters. Yes, by all means, set a healthy example and let the children see you eating these yummy and delicious foods, but please let off the judgment if they choose not to partake.
post #71 of 243
legit question, here, not meant to offend anyone: to the OP: are the daycare kids eating the "new" fruits when you offer them? if yes, then to anyone who has an answer: why would they eat them at daycare, but not at home?
post #72 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElliesMomma View Post
why would they eat them at daycare, but not at home?
: I went through a phase as a kid where I would eat literally nothing but hot dogs, sliced, with ketchup. *Except* for my aunt (my daycare provider for a few years). To me her food -- in all it's same-as-what-my-parents-ate variety -- was borderline magical. Different environments sometimes just lead to different responses.
post #73 of 243
When I was little, Grandma was forever pushing cantaloupe down our throats. As an adult, I will eat cantaloupe if it is included on my breakfast plate, but I will not go out of my way to buy it. DH strongly dislikes all melons so I can easily envision a future in which we are the rotten parents that don't give the kids cantaloupe at home.

On the other side of the coin, I didn't eat a grapefruit until I was 30 -- we just never bought them when I was growing up. And now I like grapefruit. So despite our best efforts to the contrary, our future young'uns may well turn into cantaloupe lovers!
post #74 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephandOwen View Post
How do you know that? How do you know some of these kids don't have undiagnosed sensory issues? To an outsider, my ds would look like just one heck of a picky kid. Once you dig deeper is when you figure out what the issues really are.



That's sensory right there.



And you know that about every one of those 6 kids? Or are you making an assumption? If you ask my ds "has mama ever offered you a blueberry?" he's just as likely to say no as he is to say yes (and yes, I have offered him blueberries). If you ask him "Does mama lock you in the closet all day and never feed you any food?" he's just as likely to say yes and he is to say no (and, no, I don't lock him in a closet and he has access to whatever food he wants at whatever time, more or less). You can't always trust what a 3-4 year old tells you
Sorry to hijack this thread, but Steph I would be really interested in knowing more about sensory food issues. i might cross post this. My ds is nearly 6 and still won't eat much in the way of fruit or veg. he will eat apple puree, a banana occasionally, dried bananas, raisins and mango pieces and one bite of a veg on his plate after much coercion on my part. His siblings, either side of his age, eat everything. He was brought up the same way, ate the same food, ate all fruit and veg as a small baby but stopped around 18 months to two and I don't know what to think. He does gag on kiwi and has brought it back up, but please can anyone PM me with more info I am desperate to know how to deal with this.

Okay, back in my hole now!!
post #75 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuxPerpetua View Post
I love, love, love your posts, Mamal Mama. I've been meaning to pm you that for a while, but why not make it public knowledge?
Thanks!
post #76 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post
At Costco, two water melons are $6.80

A one lb case of blackberries is $4.80

A four lb case of strawberries is $6.80

Four lbs of grapes are $7.80
Sounds like I need to find a Costco.
post #77 of 243
Quote:
But when you say things like: my daycare children don't like XYZ ... so guess what I'm serving for the next month? --
She didn't say they don't like fruits, she said they hadn't had it. What I read was that she felt they weren't getting it at home so she was going to serve lots of it.
post #78 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liquesce View Post
: I went through a phase as a kid where I would eat literally nothing but hot dogs, sliced, with ketchup. *Except* for my aunt (my daycare provider for a few years). To me her food -- in all it's same-as-what-my-parents-ate variety -- was borderline magical. Different environments sometimes just lead to different responses.
We have a lot of fun with this one around here! Owen goes to feeding therapy once a week. His OT is WONDERFUL with him and is helping him soooo much. We love her and won't be giving her up for anything.

A couple weeks ago she got Owen to drink blueberry pomegranate juice. Uhhh.... whatever happened to water and OJ being the only things he would drink?!? LOL! He did the same thing with lemonade- sucked down 2 cups for her. We went to the store and got lemonade and.... he gagged and spit it out at home

But he does something similar at daycare. He absolutely refuses to eat the lunch at daycare. No matter what it is, he will not touch it. He *may* eat a slice of bread, depending on what it looks like and whether the stars are aligned properly that day And it's not just their food. I've brought food from home, that we KNOW he loves, and serve it to him (same plates the daycare uses) in place of their lunch. He WILL. NOT. TOUCH. IT. Food we know he likes. Different setting, different people, different plates.... he won't eat it. He will happily gobble down the snack (usually apples or bananas or crackers of some sort) at daycare though : They've even gotten him to eat a couple new foods at snack time! But he won't touch his lunch.

His OT and I are working on this but, needless to say, it's frustrating! His OT's theory on eating things for her and not for me is that he needs his environment knocked upside down. So we eat in different places (outside now), use different plates/cups, etc. Anything we can do to get him out of his routine at home (which, with an autistic child, isn't easy to do!!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by arwenevenstar View Post
Sorry to hijack this thread, but Steph I would be really interested in knowing more about sensory food issues. i might cross post this.
I don't want to de-rail this thread but I'll try and get a post up about sensory food issues today sometime.
post #79 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post
At Costco, two water melons are $6.80

A one lb case of blackberries is $4.80

A four lb case of strawberries is $6.80

Four lbs of grapes are $7.80
Thats great if you have a costco. . . . within 400 miles. we have sams club but I am not a member. and when I was their fruits and veggies were very sub par. usually tasteless or bitter. I want my kids to like fruits and veggies so it important to me that I get stuff that actually tastes good. For the longest time I thought I hated apples, oranges and strawberries. turns out i was just eating poor quality ones. when I have a good one I quite enjoy it. But then I am the girl who knows all the guys in the produce department and when the truck comes in and when they stock what and am not scared to ask them to go in back and get me something fresher . . . . . I would rather have good frozen stuff than poor quality "fresh" stuff. when our fruits pr veggies pass their peak i hide them in stuff like smoothies or desserts or cooked up somehow. My kids may very well look at a fresh piece of fruit and think "I have ever had that" when in fact they may have had it in a smoothie or cooked in something or simply served differently than you are serving. For example I slice oranges into circles. if you were to slice them differently (at the ages of 3 and 4) they might not recognize them as oranges or when they say they have never had them, may mean "I have never had them that way."
post #80 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post
At Costco, two water melons are $6.80

A one lb case of blackberries is $4.80

A four lb case of strawberries is $6.80

Four lbs of grapes are $7.80
We don't have a Costco membership, but do have Sam's Club. They are STILL expensive for us.

Kailey will not even try a kiwi- though I have offered them.

We stick to bananas, apples, grapes, and strawberries (when they are on sale).

She does like watermelon.

AND when offered food at others houses she will say that she has never tried something when I know she has- she just forgets.

And the only veggie Kailey likes is corn- grr!
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