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These kids are three and four years old.. - Page 5

post #81 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post
But, none of these kids have any issues with food, or need therapy. They eat junk food just fine. Just nothing healthy. No. Sadly, its the way things are these days. It seems like I see so many kids who are never offered healthy foods.
My son eats junk food just fine too. And I breastfed him until he was 3 1/2 years old. And I gave him homemade organic foods instead of jarred baby foods. But now at 4 1/2 years old, he's 30 lbs and is required to drink a carnation instant breakfast every day because now he will not eat:

-vegetables of any type, raw or cooked
-Meat of any type
-beans
-tofu
-pasta
-rice
-potatoes
-corn
-anything "mixed"
-anything with sauce on it

What does that leave? Fruits and sugary/sweet carbs. That's it. And nothing mixed. Does that make me a bad parent? Nope--I did the best I could. It makes me the parent of an autistic child with sensory processing disorder (and you guessed it...he's StephandOwen's nephew. : ).

I can guarantee he has a full range of healthy foods, fruits, and veggies to choose from at home. And his little sister eats them all just fine.
post #82 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by AllyRae View Post
It makes me the parent of an autistic child with sensory processing disorder (and you guessed it...he's StephandOwen's nephew. : ).
Yup, the two crazy cousins

And just to point out, in case you think my ds was raised on formula and went straight to cheeto's.... he was breastfed for 3 1/2 years until he self weaned. When he started eating food I made 95% of what he ate (the other 5% were times we were out of the house so I grabbed a jar of food.... he ate less than 10 jars in his life and most of those were the organic kinds). He ate a wide variety of foods between 6 months and 18 months, including all sorts of fruits and veggies, berries (which were grown in our backyard so we had TONS of raspberries, black raspberries and blackberries. That was actually his breakfast for his 1st birthday), fish, ground meat (in spaghetti sauce and in chili), gezpacho, rice, pastas, etc. 99% of what he ate was healthy (if for no other reason than he HATED sweet things- no cake, cookies, brownies, ice cream, etc for him!).

And then it all went downhill. At his worst he was down to bananas, cheez-it crackers, water, breastmilk, apples (sometimes, not always), watermelon, french fries, and donuts (only certain ones, couldn't have sprinkles or anything like that on them). He was showing many many signs of autism and SPD, only part of which was food related (though food was, and still is, a major issue).

At 4 years old he had a nutrition evaluation. He was getting HALF the calories he needed (and that was with donuts and fries in his diet!!). This was not an issue of being a picky eater. This was an issue of a disorder severely affecting him. Fortunately we got him into feeding therapy and he's doing well, but still has a LOT of work to do. He still eats no meat, beans, rice, pasta (except Kraft mac n cheese and spaghetti, bow-ties with homemade smooth sauce only), berries (except the random bite from a strawberry), veggies (except raw carrots), tofu, dips (except ketchup on fries), mixed foods at all (once he graduates from his single food therapy he'll move on to mixed foods.... it'll be a looooong process- we're looking at years of feeding therapy).
post #83 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by nextcommercial View Post
At Costco, two water melons are $6.80

A one lb case of blackberries is $4.80

A four lb case of strawberries is $6.80

Four lbs of grapes are $7.80
That is not cheap...if you have a limited weekly grocery budget, $5 or more is a whole lot of money to spend on something that will spoil in less than a week. And ack...$7.80 for 4 pounds of grapes? That's almost $2 a pound! There is no way I'd pay that much! I won't buy grapes if they're more than $1/lb. I also won't buy watermelon for more than $2.50 each....or strawberries for more than $1.50/lb...those prices aren't even close to reasonable.
post #84 of 243
I haven't read all the posts but wanted to reply.

Don't assume anything. DD1 would not eat strawberries (despite them being a frequent) for a long time. It wasn't until she was 2.5 she licked one. Not eat one, LICKED one. Maybe these kids have been exposed but because they refused the first (or second or third....) time round the parents dropped it. I had given up on strawberries and was surprised when she ate one last month (she's almost three).

Also, I wouldn't push the food unless you know for sure there are no allergies. I have seen it mentioned children naturally avoid foods that may not agree with them (whether it be upset stomach or full blown allergy).

Who knows? Maybe they are just picky eaters. Just because they like junk food and eat it willingly doesn't mean they don't get veggies and fruits offered and served to them when they aren't at your house.

And for most mainstream eaters I don't think blueberries and kiwis and what not rate high on the list of foods to get. Before we went vegetarian our fruit was apples, oranges, bananas, and lemons and limes. Occasionally mangos or something would land in the basket but those foods were expensive! It didn't make sense to be buying them when 1. they weren't our "normal" selection and 2. when quality can't always be assured. We rarely buy blueberries. They are spendy! If we do it's more like a special treat for us later on. My kids will rip through them (DD1 sneaks off with the little container and eats them by herself in one sitting) and then it seems like they were wasted for what we paid for them. For all you know that could be the case with these families.

I think this is a "don't assume" moment personally.
post #85 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
She didn't say they don't like fruits, she said they hadn't had it. What I read was that she felt they weren't getting it at home so she was going to serve lots of it.
Well, I read her posts as saying that they hadn't had those particular fruits and weren't familiar with them, so they weren't wanting to try them, so she was going to keep serving them for the rest of the season.

Not so bad in itself -- but combined with her critique of the parents, it just seemed rather patronizing and controlling to me. I wouldn't have reacted so much to her decision to serve the fruits they didn't want, if it weren't for the way it seemed the parents were being slammed.
post #86 of 243
We don't serve pineapple or kiwi in our house as I'm allergic to them. The kids smush bananas into the carpet, so they're not allowed. None of them will eat oranges, raspberries, blackberries, and only one will eat blueberries and strawberries. They love one type of apple only and won't eat any other. Mango's, starfruit, etc.. they won't even try or touch. They like grapes, but they're too expensive right now. Mainly, they eat apples. It's not from lack of my trying, it's from sensory issues and dislikes of foods. Same with veggies. They'll eat corn, potatoes, carrots, beans, and tomatoes. Carrots are the only raw veggie they'll eat. I eat squash daily, they won't touch it. It's not always the parents, yk.
post #87 of 243
I don't know, this thread reminds me of another one I was reading recently. To paraphrase another poster from that thread: Oh no! Run, cover up your kids before they catch the dreaded mainstream disease.

All kids are different. What they do for a parent is different for a friend. Congrats to the original poster for offering up such wonderful fruits.
post #88 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by nataliachick7 View Post
I dont buy the whole "but fruits are expensive" thing. When I go to mainstream grocery stores like jewel, I see people with carts full of oreos, poptarts, chips, froot loops, etc. You can buy a few packs of berries or veggies or whatever instead of all that CRAP. USA kids are brought up on JUNK. When they see fruits or veggies they dont know what to do.
My son has eaten berries, kiwi, mango, etc on an almost daily basis since 9 months old. Its not that expensive, i just dont buy all that crap food.
We eat mainly locally grown food that is in-season, so my child doesn't often have berries, mango, or kiwis. We had a good run of 4 weeks of strawberries.

So he wouldn't know what to do with a kiwi if you put it in front of him.

I think we have a serious food problem in this country. But kids are picky eaters. And honestly, when I look at a cart full of these fruits, I immediately think of the gas that it took to get them to my city, the fact that they probably came from Monsanto seeds, etc. I am almost as repulsed by that as you may be from fruit loops.
post #89 of 243
[QUOTE=Llyra;11153553]

My kids LIVE on raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, and strawberries. They're hideously expensive most of the year in the supermarkets, so what I do is wait until they're in season locally, and buy up a TON of them at the cheapest prices I can find like at the farmer's market or a local farmstand. Then I freeze them in the deep freeze. Then we break out a bag or two a week all winter. Nothing like fresh-off-the-bush raspberries in January. I try to freeze them the same day they were picked, so they're marvelous.

We're big on fresh produce. We grow tons ourselves, buy a huge CSA share every year, and haunt the local farmstands and farmer's market. Then we freeze for the whole year. You can save a ton of money that way. Plus, you get to try so many neat things. My kids have tried just about every veggie and fruit that's available here. I want them to experience all of it while they're still young enough to be open to new food experiences. So occasionally I'll even splurge on the tropical fruits or on odd stuff like starfruit or Sharon fruit.

QUOTE]

That's awesome. We don't have much in the way of berries here (desert).
post #90 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by OtherMother'n'Madre View Post
IWe rarely buy blueberries. They are spendy! If we do it's more like a special treat for us later on. My kids will rip through them (DD1 sneaks off with the little container and eats them by herself in one sitting) and then it seems like they were wasted for what we paid for them.
see, to me, i wouldn't consider it a waste at all if my child ate all the blueberries. i'd figure 1) they were good for her and 2) obviously her body needed them, or else she wouldn't have craved them so much to "sneak off" and devour them. to me, the only time fruit is wasted is when you buy it, don't use it for a week, and then throw it out. fresh fruit is fresh. when you buy it, eat it that day or the next. it actually loses its nutritional value the longer it sits uneaten.

i've been following this tread and i notice so many, many people are ripping the OP for being judgmental on the basis of kids with sensory issues that you would think half the kids in america have sensory issues. (maybe they do?) and then there seems to be a lot of defensiveness along the lines of fruit is such an expensive indulgence. but here i sit eating my way through two packs of sliced up strawberries (which my 2 year old is also enjoying) and if this is our worst indulgence, to me, i figure: oh well. we save money by taking second hand clothes and second hand toys and never eating out. frankly, i'd rather spend the money eating fresh food, but that's just me!
post #91 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElliesMomma View Post
there seems to be a lot of defensiveness along the lines of fruit is such an expensive indulgence. but here i sit eating my way through two packs of sliced up strawberries (which my 2 year old is also enjoying) and if this is our worst indulgence, to me, i figure: oh well. we save money by taking second hand clothes and second hand toys and never eating out. frankly, i'd rather spend the money eating fresh food, but that's just me!
At least you have enough money to choose what you would like to indulge in. Not everyone does.
post #92 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katzchen View Post
At least you have enough money to choose what you would like to indulge in. Not everyone does.
true
post #93 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElliesMomma View Post
i've been following this tread and i notice so many, many people are ripping the OP for being judgmental on the basis of kids with sensory issues that you would think half the kids in america have sensory issues. (maybe they do?)
Maybe -- but I don't see any reason to be so critical of other families and the ways they do things, sensory issues or not.

Quote:
and then there seems to be a lot of defensiveness along the lines of fruit is such an expensive indulgence. but here i sit eating my way through two packs of sliced up strawberries (which my 2 year old is also enjoying) and if this is our worst indulgence, to me, i figure: oh well. we save money by taking second hand clothes and second hand toys and never eating out. frankly, i'd rather spend the money eating fresh food, but that's just me!
I'm glad you're enjoying your snack. As far as defensiveness, I don't see why anyone should feel a need to defend their purchasing/cooking/eating choices to anyone else -- or at least to anyone outside the immediate family. I don't think anyone called fruit an expensive indulgence -- but certainly some kinds of fruit are more expensive than others.

It makes sense that people on a limited budget would focus more on foods (including fruits) that are more filling for less money -- and also, if you don't have much money for food, you tend to buy the things you know your kids will like and eat, rather than experimenting with something they might reject.
post #94 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElliesMomma View Post
the part that scares me is, my DD is a great eater at 2. i'm scared that any of this will change in the next few years. hence to redouble my efforts with gardening and that fruits and vegetables are always centerpeice to the foods she is served.
IME, it does get harder as they get older. At two, my DD loved all sorts of healthy foods. The only processed foods that she ever ate were "healthy" versions of things from the HFS. Animal crackers made from whole wheat flour and sweetened with molasses, stuff like that. And things like that were rare. She ate tons of fruits and veggies. She was my great eater.

At 4.5, she still eats a healthy diet, and does know the difference between healthy and junk, but the lines have gotten blurred since she started becoming more social and going to preschool. It is frustrating, because I laid this good solid foundation for her, and then she started becoming more socialized and hanging out with friends who brought a "healthy" snack of apples with caramel, or graham crackers with cream cheese to school or the park. A lot of her friends eat a lot of the SAD and eat a lot of fast food. It's much, much harder to keep them away from that stuff when they start hanging out with other kids. A lot of times, our friends will leave the park and go to McDonald's, and they will ask if DD wants to go while she is standing right there. It leaves me with the choice of having to dissapoint her, or giving in and taking her to McDonald's. It would be nice to shelter her forever...but I can't do that. It's just really important to find the balance, and to teach her when it's ok to have treats and junk, and when it's time to be healthy.
post #95 of 243
My girls have had blueberries, and they've had raspberries because we found a wild bush at the park one day. We buy apples, bananas on occasion and grapes when they're in season. Buying strawberries or oranges is a HUGE treat for us. Most of the other fruits we don't get unless they happen to hand those out at the local food pantry.

Fruit is expensive. We buy what we can. Unfortunately it goes bad quickly.
We also have a SN child that is picky about her foods.

For us, we don't have enough money or food stamps to buy as much fruit as we'd like.

They've never had a kiwi, fresh pinapple, guava, or many other fruits. There are also plenty of fresh vegetables they've never had. If it comes in a can or frozen chances are higher they've had it because its cheaper.

I absolutely do not see eating fruits and vegetables or lack of eating them as a sign of good mothering, or bad mothering.

I'm glad you have enough money to eat your strawberries. On good months we enjoy some too. But to assume that if we don't buy fruits and vegetables that we must be spending our money on other less important things is absurd and plain wrong. Our bills get paid and there is very little leftover for anything fun, and yes.. that includes strawberries. Its not a necessity. For us, strawberries are an expensive indulgence.

I don't judge you for buying them, why do you judge others for not buying them?
post #96 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nature View Post
My girls have had blueberries, and they've had raspberries because we found a wild bush at the park one day. We buy apples, bananas on occasion and grapes when they're in season. Buying strawberries or oranges is a HUGE treat for us. Most of the other fruits we don't get unless they happen to hand those out at the local food pantry.

Fruit is expensive. We buy what we can. Unfortunately it goes bad quickly.
We also have a SN child that is picky about her foods.

For us, we don't have enough money or food stamps to buy as much fruit as we'd like.

They've never had a kiwi, fresh pinapple, guava, or many other fruits. There are also plenty of fresh vegetables they've never had. If it comes in a can or frozen chances are higher they've had it because its cheaper.

I absolutely do not see eating fruits and vegetables or lack of eating them as a sign of good mothering, or bad mothering.

I'm glad you have enough money to eat your strawberries. On good months we enjoy some too. But to assume that if we don't buy fruits and vegetables that we must be spending our money on other less important things is absurd and plain wrong. Our bills get paid and there is very little leftover for anything fun, and yes.. that includes strawberries. Its not a necessity. For us, strawberries are an expensive indulgence.

I don't judge you for buying them, why do you judge others for not buying them?
This is well said. A big hunk of cheese can cost the same as a carton of strawberries, and cheese is a sure thing around here.
Fortunately, more and more farmer's markets and CSA's are taking WIC and food stamps, so people are getting more opportunities for fresh stuff. But not everywhere.
post #97 of 243
Quote:
This is well said. A big hunk of cheese can cost the same as a carton of strawberries, and cheese is a sure thing around here.
Fortunately, more and more farmer's markets and CSA's are taking WIC and food stamps, so people are getting more opportunities for fresh stuff. But not everywhere.
But only people who qualify for WIC or Food Stamps.

We fall right in the middle. Too much to qualify not enough to indulge.
post #98 of 243
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElliesMomma View Post
see, to me, i wouldn't consider it a waste at all if my child ate all the blueberries. i'd figure 1) they were good for her and 2) obviously her body needed them, or else she wouldn't have craved them so much to "sneak off" and devour them. to me, the only time fruit is wasted is when you buy it, don't use it for a week, and then throw it out. fresh fruit is fresh. when you buy it, eat it that day or the next. it actually loses its nutritional value the longer it sits uneaten.
No I know it's not wasted and I'm glad she eats them! It's the mentality of wanting thins to last and not get ripped through so quickly. I plan out foods big time so if they are gone within two seconds and I meal planned with them things get difficult. I'm sure I'm not the only person to have that mentality. For all we know the parents mentioned in the op could be of the same mind set.

Interesting thread.
post #99 of 243
i'm sorry for those who are struggling by on food stamps, WIC, etc. i can imagine that it must be tough to be on a tight tight budget. FTR my strawberries were $1.29 a pound at aldi.
post #100 of 243
Elliesmama- I wish we had an Aldi's close but ours is in Southern Pines - a 45 minute drive. Gas is too high to be driving that far, even for a sale.

We have Food Lion and Walmart in our town, oh and Food King (nasty veggies and fruits though).
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