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Workshop #2 - Baby’s Early Years; Breastfeeding - Page 2

post #21 of 79
I have four children and this October I will have been nursing continuously for eight years. Ds1 nursed until right after his fourth birthday. Dd nursed until she was 3 years and 10 months. Ds2 and ds3 are both still nursing.

I had always planned to breastfeed and when I was pregnant with ds1 I was determined to nurse him for a year. Several people, including my ex-mil, told me that it would be a hassle and that we wouldn't make it a year. Being a little bit stubborn, their lack of confidence helped keep me going. I just had to prove them wrong.

My first husband halfheartedly supported me nursing ds1. He knew it was healthy but wanted to bottlefeed ds himself. When ds1 was six months, xh moved us out and his girlfriend in. I remarried when ds1 was 20 months, to a guy who was not only a great dad, but really supported the nursing. He wasn't totally comfortable with nursing toddlers in public and would still rather that we not nurse the 2 1/2 year old when we're out. But it's not as big of a deal anymore.
post #22 of 79
I had trouble at every turn when it came to breastfeeding. I had an unplanned c/s, and my milk did not come in right away. The hospital LC was harassing me with this ridiculous supplementer and formula. She only "let" us go home if I promised to take DS to the pediatrician the next day to make sure he gained some weight. That night, my milk came in and DS gained half a pound--overnight. DS nursed constantly, and he was on the small side, but he gained weight consistently. I also had terribly painful plugged ducts on and off in the first six or eight months or so. I got through those times without any drugs, just hot compresses, showers, massage, and position changes when breastfeeding. It was hard to breastfeed, but it got a lot easier as DS got older. I wanted to wean him, but I waited until he was 2 years, 3 mos., and he didn't even notice. My skinny little baby is now the tallest in his class and is surprisingly strong. Do not give up on the breastfeeding, it's sooo worth it! Take all formula pushing people (in-laws, relatives, doctors, and unethical hospital LCs) with a grain of salt.

They were also a little antsy about me getting DS circumcised in the hospital. I decided that we'd had enough cutting, so we took DS home uncircumcised. My pediatrician only asked about it during the first visit, then he let it go (love that guy!).

We still don't sleep well, DS has always been one of those not-so-great sleepers. The problem is that we EXPECTED to sleep well because of what all those baby books tell you. Sleep through the night at 3 mos? HA! I also have never done the cry it out or Ferberizing approach because I don't think it would work for DS and it seems really inappropriate IMHO. I actually sleep better when I'm at least close enough to DS to hear him breathe. That sound still lulls me to sleep at night.

DS didn't talk a lot until just before two. I was almost ready to take him for testing, then his communication exploded. Several of my friends kept hounding me to get him checked for autism, I did my best to ignore them. He still isn't the most clear talker, but he communicates very well now and his teachers tell me he is fine.

I was really worried about potty training since we had some disastrous false starts, but when DS was ready, he was totally ready. He reliably goes in his potty--and it only took a week (and he is only 2.75 yrs).

So, anyway, my point in mentioning all this is to (hopefully) calm the nerves of some of you out there and to give you the confidence to follow what you believe instead of what others tell you. Enjoy your babies, moms and dads!
post #23 of 79
i am a work out of home mom. i run a medium sized multi million dollar company and work around 60 hours a week.
i nursed my daughter until she was 14 months old and my milk dried up due to another pregnancy, she still nurses (at 17 months) but not as much any more.
I pumped every 2-3 hours every day for over a year and it was worth every second.
i had to schedule meetings around pumping sessions. i had to pump during webinars, i missed going on trips due to this, but it was sooo worth it.
post #24 of 79
I found out I was pregnant w dd1 Liz a few weeks after Sept 11th, 2001. We were trying and I felt terrible but I thought it was because I was upset because of what happend. The whole country walked around zombie like and each and every day post 9/11 was mentioned. To get away from it, I researched pregncy, week to week, pumping, breast feeding etc. I saw all my SILs breastfeed, my MIL breastfed all of her 9 children and knows the founders of LLL. (we are in the chicago area) My mom friends also nursed their babies.

After we got married, well before we even thought of children, DH said to me "you will breastfeed our children, RIGHT??" So he was of course on board. He joked breastfeeding is great. The baby would cry in the night, he would reach for her, put her at my breast, roll over and go back to sleep- whats not to like about it? He shared this with his expectant SIL and brother one day, I was in the other room. His two other brothers and father chimed in the same.

Liz was born May 24th 2002 (our 5 yr wedding anniversary). She was put to the breast right away which started off our 2 1/2 year breastfeeding relationship. I never planned to nurse that long- who does? I thought, I will give it 6 mos. It came and went. Well at a year, I can wean her. It came and went. 18 mos, 24 mos. Never an ounce of formula, great nursing relationship. I was very lucky. At 2 1/2, she upped and weaned one day and never looked back. I am a strong minded person, so no one would dare to say dont breastfeed here or anything like that. Also, I nursed in public dozens and dozens of times. Sometimes people would comment how my child was so calm and quiet. She was nursing! Then- oh you were, I just thought she was a quiet baby!
Once my brother asked my to cover her up with a blanket. It was 100 plus degrees outside. I said I would if he also put one over his head during dinner. If anyone asked me to go to a bathroom, I would say only if you eat in there too.

NEXT!!

I gave my self 6 mos of no nursing and no pregncy and then we tried for Maggie. It took longer to conceive, but Maggie was due late May/june 1 2006. At 24 weeks, I started having issues. At the end of 24 weeks I suddenly had to deliver this tiny baby! I was being rolled into the operating room to have a c section. I remember telling the nurse when we got back to my room, there would be a medala hospital grade pump there. She asked why? I yelled- because I nursed my first one within 20 minutes, I need to get that going since I will need to pump for this one!!!

So after they rushed my beautiful 810 gram baby off to another hospital nicu, I starting pumping. And pumping and pumping. 48 hours at discharge, I had 8 little bottles of colostrum. The nurses changed their tune on what to tell early pregncy deliveries. Of course, I had nursed one already, so my milk came in fast and furious. It smelled different, was thicker, stronger, smelled like iron. It was full of stuff my body knew the baby needed to thrive. I continued to pump exclusely for 7 weeks until Maggie was ready to be put to breast. I remember the nicu watching me, not knowing I was nursing her already and asking me if I wanted screens, what I needed. I explained she had already nursed for a few minutes.
After a bout w apnea, fighting not to have supplements, you name it, I took my then full term baby home. We had to supplement, but she nursed for a year after.

Maggie was a busy body- had to check everything out, could not miss anything. So sitting in mommy's lap to nurse for hours like her sister was not in the cards. She upped and weaned around 1 yrs old despite her mamas protests.

All in all, I had a lot of support for both of my nurslings. I was active in LLL, joined a local breastfeeding mamas group, plus my activity here. I was so blessed to have such a strong knowledge of this when I had MAggie because if I didnt, who knows how well she would be doing now?
post #25 of 79
I work at whole foods and have noticed many many women (and their husbands) coming in because they have low milk supply. I usually suggest Mother's milk tea and lactate support (it's got a lot of galactogogues in it). Did anyone use those things successfully? And do you have any other suggestions I can give to moms with low milk supply? I also suggest nursing as often as possible, not on a schedule.

I used Mother's Milk tea with ds1 in the begining because he lost so much weight and I wasn't sure I was producing enough milk, but I don't know whether it was the constant nursing or the Mother's Milk Tea or both that did the trick.
post #26 of 79
I also have used Mother's Milk tea and recommended it in the past for low supply, I also used fenugreek and made tea with it, but the taste was just too bitter for me to wash down.
post #27 of 79
I put him to the breast constantly, and also had oatmeal daily.
post #28 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by race_kelly View Post
I work at whole foods and have noticed many many women (and their husbands) coming in because they have low milk supply. I usually suggest Mother's milk tea and lactate support (it's got a lot of galactogogues in it). Did anyone use those things successfully? And do you have any other suggestions I can give to moms with low milk supply? I also suggest nursing as often as possible, not on a schedule.

I used Mother's Milk tea with ds1 in the begining because he lost so much weight and I wasn't sure I was producing enough milk, but I don't know whether it was the constant nursing or the Mother's Milk Tea or both that did the trick.
i was told to use fenugreek by my LC and it worked great. i took it in capsule form. you can take quite a bit-the goal was to smell like maple syrup. i think i took about 3-6 capsules a day. combined with nursing on demand and drinking about 6 liters of water a day i established a good supply in 2 weeks and stopped taking the fenugreek at that point. the MM tea was not a strong enough concentration for me but it tasted good and was nice to sip.

btwn. a doula friend, the lc and the ped. i got a lot of good advice on nursing.

my ped was very supportive of co-sleeping to facilitate nursing, nurse-ins (all day marathon nursing sessions) and telling my dh 'you take care of the mama so the mama can feed the baby'. she also told me that in the beginning babies nurse a lot and can take a long time at the breast to get their needs met. once i knew that, mentally, i was more prepared for basically having the boob out all day!

the doula was very good at giving me that confidence i needed to stick it out. she came to my house and saw that i had a boppy and a comfy nursing station, checked ds's latch and advised me on the water/fluids. she was very very kind and said just what i needed to hear as a first time mother - 'you are doing great. you can do this. stick it out for 21 days and you'll be set.'

the lc told me about the fenugreek. she was the least warm and fuzzy but the most specific.

our nursing relationship got off to a tough start. i had a blood transfusion for a hemmorrage after i gave birth. it's very dehydrating to lose a lot of blood and even with the transfusion your body sucks all moisture to feed your own body and build up your blood supply (not make milk). i was really determined to do it. i'm kind of a quitter so it still amazes me i stuck it out and i'm happy i did!
post #29 of 79
I know an older lady from Saudia Arabia who swears by canned Tuna fish- I know there are some heavy metal risks there, but I think it's worth a shot in small quantities!
post #30 of 79
Fenugreek is most effective when taken with blessed thistle. Start at 3 capsules of each three times a day. If mom's sweat and pee aren't smelling like maple syrup after the first day, up the dose of fenugreek to 4 capsules 3 times a day. Keep upping till you smell the maple syrup...but 3 or 4 should do it, three times a day.

The capsules are more effective for low supply than the tea...the tea is better for a little "boost..." but the capsules are for true support of low supply.

I would ask (you may not feel comfortable doing this...but you might, too!) if they have had somebody evaluate the latch, and suggest a LLL Leader and an asymmetrical latch. If the supply is compromised there is generally a reason why, and usually that reason is poor latch. With a poor latch the breast is often not drained sufficiently to create a large demand on the breast, so the supply will diminish. Fenugreek and Blessed Thistle will help to support that supply until they can get the latch perfected.
post #31 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by courtenay_e View Post
Fenugreek is most effective when taken with blessed thistle. Start at 3 capsules of each three times a day. If mom's sweat and pee aren't smelling like maple syrup after the first day, up the dose of fenugreek to 4 capsules 3 times a day. Keep upping till you smell the maple syrup...but 3 or 4 should do it, three times a day.

The capsules are more effective for low supply than the tea...the tea is better for a little "boost..." but the capsules are for true support of low supply.

I would ask (you may not feel comfortable doing this...but you might, too!) if they have had somebody evaluate the latch, and suggest a LLL Leader and an asymmetrical latch. If the supply is compromised there is generally a reason why, and usually that reason is poor latch. With a poor latch the breast is often not drained sufficiently to create a large demand on the breast, so the supply will diminish. Fenugreek and Blessed Thistle will help to support that supply until they can get the latch perfected.
I usually recommend a LLL leader or an IBCLC. I probably ask more personal questions than I should, but I just can't help myself! LOL!

I absolutely love to see the dads or other family members involved in the breastfeeding relationship. I've had 3 dads come in and have long discusions about breastfeeding with me when they realise that I'm not weirded out by it. They are usually there looking for advice for mom, because she is so exhausted from breastfeeding.

I usually feel like they are gong to make it, because they have some good support at home. I think that support can come in so many different ways. It can come from the partner who is helpful and encouraging, but I also see so many women here who have done it all on their own, because they truly believed they were doing the right thing. I really salute all those mamas that have had problems and have managed to breastfeed or pump despite them. You go mamas!!
post #32 of 79
I know people probably think I'm crazy when I say it, but for me it's very true. Breastfeeding saved me and was the ONLY way I was able to bond with my son, Paul.

I had a horrible c-section and couldn't even hold him to nurse right away. Thankfully a wonderful nurse who hadn't even been around at all for the labor/birth, came in and held him for me to nurse. He took to it well! During our stay I got some help with latch. They said he was losing too much weight, and the ped came in and told me we'd have to stay longer if he didn't get formula. I'm so glad we didn't give in, that afternoon, my milk came in with full force!

I ended up with PPD. The only thing I could do was nurse him. It's the only reason I didn't leave. Even once I was on some meds, it was still the only way I was able to connect with him. I missed so much of his early days and months, but I do know he ate a lot!

He is still nursing full time at 14 months and I see no stopping at all. He loves to nurse and gets very excited about it .

As others have said, having a supportive spouse is very helpful. I don't know what I'd do if my DH wasn't on board with breastfeeding, it would have been so much harder!

Julie
post #33 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by race_kelly View Post
I usually recommend a LLL leader or an IBCLC. I probably ask more personal questions than I should, but I just can't help myself! LOL!

I absolutely love to see the dads or other family members involved in the breastfeeding relationship. I've had 3 dads come in and have long discusions about breastfeeding with me when they realise that I'm not weirded out by it. They are usually there looking for advice for mom, because she is so exhausted from breastfeeding.

I usually feel like they are gong to make it, because they have some good support at home. I think that support can come in so many different ways. It can come from the partner who is helpful and encouraging, but I also see so many women here who have done it all on their own, because they truly believed they were doing the right thing. I really salute all those mamas that have had problems and have managed to breastfeed or pump despite them. You go mamas!!
i think that's great that you are willing to go there, to give suggestion and advice to these dads when they come in. i got so little help at the local HFS when i went in. and i was completely exhausted from birthing and bfing but i would have been petrified to send my dh. he would've come back with a crazy bunch of useless stuff. supplements, etc are so expensive. i think it's wonderful that you're suggesting the fenugreek, etc. it's so harmless but helpful and i know most HFS employees wont recommend stuff because they can get in "trouble". so bravo to you! i'm sure you've helped a lot of those moms (and dads) just when they needed it.
post #34 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShwarmaQueen View Post
I know an older lady from Saudia Arabia who swears by canned Tuna fish- I know there are some heavy metal risks there, but I think it's worth a shot in small quantities!

Wow! I've never heard of that one. I wonder what could be in it that helps with milk production.

Another supplement that I always suggest to mamas who are breastfeeding is the DHA supplements. Babes are so lucky to get it through breastmilk with moms as long as they are getting what they need too.

Did anyone else suffer with cracked nipples? I know I was told that it had to do with proper latch, but it just seemed to go away after a month or so and I couldn't see where the latch had changes. Hurt like heck though! I didn't go through it with my second and third child, but then again, I started with inverted nipples with ds1. He kindly sucked them out into proper nursing formed nipples. I wonder if that had to do with the nipple cracking.
post #35 of 79
I wonder if the tuna fish is just as a protein source. In someone who is malnourished, with a diet lacking in protein, eating tuna (or another healthy -- well, polluted but healthy -- protein heavy food) could help with supply.

DHA is great because it helps with mood, too (as does EPA). Of course you have to check for fish allergies first!
post #36 of 79
Hi,

I have 5 boys. With my first babies, I lived with my ILs...I breastfed some with #1 and 2, didn't even try with 3...was just so depressed and overpowered by MIL who sabotaged my attempts at BFding...she bought formula, fed the babies even when
I was there to BF. This was in the early 90s...I didn't even know about lactation consultants or breast pumps so when I went to work, I replaced with formula, between that and MIL, my milk dried up.

I had #4 in 1997...was away from MIL and learned about LCs and breast pumps. DH was SAHD, pumped while at work...babe reversed cycled and nursed all night until age 5.5 almost 6.

Babe #5 is here and BFding is going strong.

Its sad, but I am so much closer with #4 and even #5 although he is only 4 months, than with my older kids. I love them all but we just aren't as close. I blame the lack of APing. (I just couldn't "mom" the way I knew was right. She was very mainstream...threw a fit one time when she "caught" me cosleeping and BFding among other issues she had with me LOL.)
post #37 of 79
I breastfeeding!

I have to say that before I was pregnant with dd1 I was completely ignorant to breastfeeding. My mom nursed my sister and brother but only in the privacy of her bedroom so I couldn't see and I never knew that she bfed at all until this past year. She came from a family of women who never breastfed; on my dad's side my grandmother nursed all her babies except my dad (lots of dietary issues) but she never talked about it. Imagine my surprise when I found out a few months ago that she EBF the rest of her kids until they were 1! That was practically unheard of in the 50's.

I was one of those completely ignorant 20 year-olds that would become grossed out by babies breastfeeding at my tables (I waitress). I even said out loud, "That is freaking nasty, that's what formula is for!" I was so stupid.

Sooo...dd1 comes along and I decide I want to breastfeed. I believe it was the positive reviews it got in Dr. Sears The Baby Book and The Complete Book of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Newborn that changed my mind. I was so excited about breastfeeding!

Then Zoe was born, and it sucked. Her birth was traumatic, and I put her to my breast as soon as she was out but it HURT. This was while I was being stitched up, had completely random doctors in and out of my room to look at my crotch while I was trying to do so, and after 2 days of this I felt so utterly exhausted and defeated. I felt like my body was betraying me again, I couldn't get her to latch on, I had LC's in and out of my room, and I still couldn't do it right. I couldn't even bring myself to argue with the nurses about giving her formula, and we took that Enfamil bag right home. I tried off and on for about 10 days to get her to latch on, and finally I just gave up. My nipples looked and felt like hamburger. So I exclusively pumped for her for the next 6 months and supplemented with formula, but as you know pumping just isn't the same as a baby so my supply dropped off terribly. I was working fulltime too and trying to find the time to pump constantly was not working. I called it quits at 6 months because I figured what was the point if my supply was just going to continue to dwindle and she was getting mostly formula anyway?

It took a long time for me to want to get pregnant again because I was so terrified of the same outcome. But I went on Susan Weed's website and posted about my first birth experience, and was directed here. This place is a safe haven if there ever was one. I have learned so much here, and I really believe it led me to have a better birth the second time around.

With dd2, I had the best birth experience ever. I actually had a truly sublime, empowering, and healing hospital birth (yes it is possible). I ran the show and gave birth the way I wanted to. Avery was put to my breast immediately. The entire nursing staff and the hospital LC's were phenomenal (apparently most of the nurses not only had nursed all their children but were LC's on the side as well!) My baby's latch kind of sucked and my nipples were sooo bruised (why can't my damn kids figure out how to latch!!?), but that worked itself out and she actually gained an entire pound by the time she was a week old! There is a reason I call her Chunky Monkey.

I am so proud of myself for finally pulling it off. I felt like such a failure after dd1's birth, and my second baby truly healed me. I am happy to report that she is still nursing like a champ and she just turned 1. We don't plan on stopping anytime soon.

The highlight of my day? When Avery is nursing and she pushes her nose into my boob and blows hard with her nose so it makes a farting sound. Then she giggles her little butt off.

Nose raspberries!
post #38 of 79
I always knew that I would breastfeed my children. My mother exclusively breastfed all 5 of her children for at least a year, except for one sister who ended up weaned at 7 months or so (nursing strike!). I can still remember my mother starting her nursing relationship with one of my sisters; sis had a teeny tiny rosebud mouth and my mother had a heck of a time getting her entire nipple in there, she kept having to unlatch, relatch, unlatch, relatch. My sister was not happy about this and would scream her little head off. Fortunately things worked themselves out pretty quickly (or her mouth got bigger from all the screaming...)

To prepare for breastfeeding (and for the entire experience of parenting) I prepared for the worst-case scenarios while hoping for the best situation (birth-center drug-free birth, exclusive breastfeeding relationship, etc.) I read _The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding_ and took a Bradley class. I also attended a local LLL meeting just in case I needed to call them. I researched and had a number for some lactation consultants. I bought a few stretchy nursing bras to start with.

When DS was born, I needed exactly none of my prep work. He latched on perfectly within the first 5 minutes of being born and didn't let go for three years, uh, I mean, he never had a single problem nursing, no nipple pain or anything. It was almost a letdown after all the preparation!

The one part of preparation that did come into play were the expectations I had of myself. I figured out that it was likely that I would be breastfeeding up to 8 hours per day in the beginning, and this was definitely true for me. I had a hungry 10 pound baby who liked to nurse for up to 40 minutes at a time. I drank gallons of water and inhaled every bite of food in sight. I was glad that I realized beforehand how much time I would spend nursing; just that part of baby care was a complete full-time job! I took it really easy those first months, holding and nursing my beautiful baby.

He nursed a great deal until he was about 19 months old, which was when I entered the 2nd trimester of my pregnancy with DD, and my milk dried up. He was down to once a day or so during that period. (He would ask, "Ow? Ow?" when he wanted to nurse because that was what I tended to say when he was nursing; it was quite painful during this period. I usually focused on a book while he was nursing to get through it.) He was pleased when my colostrum came in, and thrilled when the milk came back in. I really wanted to nurse him until he was at least 2 years old, in fact I felt guilty that I didn't have milk for him during the pregnancy. When he turned 2, DD arrived, and my intuition told me that tandem nursing was the way to go, particularly because DS is a very intense child who seemed to really *need* to nurse still, for emotional reasons.

DD waited until she was 45 minutes old to nurse (she was 10.5 lbs), but had no problems whatsoever... well there was that one night before my milk came in when she alternately screamed and nursed in one minute increments all night long, but after that she was great! I did have a little adjustment period to going back to nursing a newborn; I was in toddler-nursing mode and had to re-think nursing holds and support for her instead of assuming that she could just do it all herself, hanging off the boob so to speak.

We tandem-nursed for a year. This was great as it gave DS something to do while I was nursing DD, and he didn't feel left out. We learned a lot of creative holds and positions to keep everyone happy. After a while it got to be a little overwhelming, so I did limit DS to nursing 3x per day. A little while before he turned 3, I talked about how one day he would be a big boy and wouldn't do nursies anymore and told him one day I would ask if he wanted to nurse, and he would tell me he was finished with nursies. So I guess you could say that I did influence him to wean himself. I tried to make it as much his idea as possible, and it went smoothly a month or so after he turned 3, although we did nurse a handful more times until he was 30 months.

I would tandem nurse again if I could do it all over again. I think it was the right decision for DS, but I will say that DS and I have a very intense relationship (most of the conflict in the house is between him and me because we are both spirited) and our relationship became less stressed after he weaned. After weaning he became more of my sweet little boy rather than the big rough toddler-tyrant he seemed to be that tandem-nursing year. I gues I was just ready for him to wean. Having said all of that, we have been thru the 3.5 year rough patch since he weaned, during which I wanted nothing more than to ship him away to boarding school. : I think this is just the way our relationship is going to be for always.

DD is 21 months and still going strong, we just NIP today at a food festival and it was fun to catch the eyes of all the people staring (mostly men). One thing that is driving me nuts with DD is that she doesn't sleep thru the night at all, and wants nursies all night long. I had her night weaned for a while (she would still wake up several times, I would cosleep and offer water) but DH and I went on a trip overnight and since we returned we are back to being open 24/7. I am still breastfeeding on demand, mostly because it is so darned easy. Oh, except when I am in the middle of making dinner, which really makes DD mad.

My support system: my family (even bfing mom!) thinks I am a little deranged for the toddler nursing, but no one says anything to my face, except my grandmother, who fed my 5 weeks preemie dad evaporated milk mixed with corn syrup when he was a baby (he died of complications of obesity at age 48... hmmmm) She is extremely supportive and tells me all the time how beautiful the kids are, but I can hear sometimes that she is working through the guilt of how things were when she had her babies. She loves that they both eat so plentifully, as she is a Feeder. DH is extremely supportive; without him running the household while I sat nursing infants I don't know where we would be now. Some of the people in his family are a bit uncomfortable with the bfing, several male relatives tend to leap up and go to another room when I start the pre-bfing fidget.

I'm so glad that I had the opportunity to nurse both my children, and I hope to make it to at least 5 consecutive years bfing, which will be 3 years per child with one overlapping tandem nursing year. I look forward to wearing regular bras again (I sometimes wear them for old time's sake), dresses, and not having to think, "Can I breastfeed in this?" when I am buying clothes.

I also want to say I feel somewhat guilty that I haven't had any problems, and therefore don't have much advice to give moms who are struggling. I've been to only a few LLL meetings over the years, but didn't participate very much, not having much advice, and more recently chasing a highly active toddler around.

I just hope that my example of breastfeeding (confidently in public, into toddlerhood, etc.) has inspired other mothers I know to keep on going. I gave my copy of _Womanly Art of BFing_ to a new mother I know as an acquaintance, and it helped her to do an elimination diet and keep nursing. People also ask me for nursing advice on a regular basis, b/c the ped always recommends supplementing. I don't want to jam info down anyone's throat or pass judgment when a baby weans/is weaned, although I am sad when it happens. I try to encourage, praise, and casually drop facts into conversation. (I do this about a lot of topics, so I hope it comes across pretty naturally.)

I would like to learn more about lactivism, and do more to promote breastfeeding in our culture. The only thing I do right now is email my local paper whenever they run an article that I think should mention breastfeeding. This week they (Wash Post) are running an article series on Childhood Obesity and What Parents Can Do, and I am looking for some mention of the association between lack of bfing and childhood obesity rates.

Sorry about the novel, I only know how to write one type of post--LONG! Thanks for reading.

-dflanag2
sahm to DS the hair holder (3.5 yrs) and DD the pincher (21 mos)
post #39 of 79
Quote:
The highlight of my day? When Avery is nursing and she pushes her nose into my boob and blows hard with her nose so it makes a farting sound. Then she giggles her little but off.

Nose raspberries!
That is so sweet!

dflanag2-
How wonderful that you have a memory of your mom breastfeeding! I vaguely remember one of my aunts breastfeeding, but not very clearly. I know my mom bresatfed us, but I was the baby in the family and don't remember it. I'll have to ask my sisters if they remember any of it.
post #40 of 79
So much great advice! I have a couple questions for all you well educated ladies. Is there anything to do for a milk supply that never really started? With DS I never had milk "come in" like everyone talks about. I didn't know about herbs back then, but did try reglan, pumpled finatically, ate well, drank lots. Still, I never had a real supply. Looking back, my breasts never got any bigger during pregnancy, and I have read that can be a sign of supply trouble later on. Fast forward to now. I am almost 8wks with #2, no growth in the chest area as of yet. I am very concerned I am going to have the same problem, and would really like to exclusivly nurse this time for as long as possible. Any thoughts? Thanks.
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Mothering › Mothering Forums › Archives › Miscellaneous › Natural Family Living Workshops › Workshop #2 - Baby’s Early Years; Breastfeeding