or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Preteens and Teens › Issue in English class
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Issue in English class - Page 2

post #21 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyofmany View Post
The teacher is 22 years old, fresh out of college. I don't think SHE'S mature enough to teach material like that.
Ouch. As a person she's not mature enough? Or no 22 yr old fresh out of college would be?

Because as a 22yr old -fresh out of college- teacher I would have been fine teaching this sort of material.

-Angela
post #22 of 128
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Ouch. As a person she's not mature enough? Or no 22 yr old fresh out of college would be?

Because as a 22yr old -fresh out of college- teacher I would have been fine teaching this sort of material.

-Angela
As a person. I regret even posting this now.
post #23 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyofmany View Post
As a person. I regret even posting this now.
Okay. Some people aren't. But then perhaps they aren't good teachers for 14 yr olds at all.

-Angela
post #24 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by tex.mom View Post
I had to look it up, and here it is in a nutshell:

"Melinda Sordino can classify every incoming and returning student at Merryweather High according to the clique to which he/she belongs. The only problem is that she doesn't belong to any of them -- not the jocks, punks, nerds, Marthas, bandgeeks -- not a single one. She used to, but not any more. Not after what she did.

What she did was call the cops to bust up a party at the end of summer. Not out of spite or stupidity, though that's what everyone thinks. They don't know the real reason, and most of them really don't want to know. Even if they did, Melinda couldn't tell them. Even if she wanted to.

Rape is not a word that falls freely from the tongue."

It's about a freshman girl who is raped at a party and almost speaks up but doesn't, resulting in her becoming withdrawn and alienated. If only that plot weren't so realistic. Sounds like it would be a good discussion starter. It deals a lot with the first year of high school so I'm sure that's why it was selected for his grade.
Wow from this description I think that it could be a great spring board for so many conversations, so yep I would let my son read it.
post #25 of 128
I read it a few years ago, as it was one of a group of books I got w/Scholastic bonus pts for my classroom (grades 5-8); I remember it being a good, thought-provoking book, & several students did book reports on it. FWIW, I was the middle school English teacher at a small Christian school, & we read To Kill a Mockingbird as a class in 6th grade. I tried to present/provide books with young protagonists facing peer pressure or in finding one's personal strengths in dealing with larger issues.
post #26 of 128
Can you explain what your concerns are with the book?
post #27 of 128
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa View Post
Can you explain what your concerns are with the book?
I think it'a wrong to discuss sexual asault and rape in a 9th grade classroom. That's my problem with it. I'm obviously not as free of a thinker as most here, and I believe such things shouldn't be discussed in school.
post #28 of 128
Why don't you think these topics should be discussed in school? What is the fear, exactly? I'm not being snarky, I just want to understand where you're coming from on this. So many other "unpleasant" topics are discussed in school: war, slavery, genocide. What makes this topic different?
post #29 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyofmany View Post
I think it'a wrong to discuss sexual asault and rape in a 9th grade classroom. That's my problem with it. I'm obviously not as free of a thinker as most here, and I believe such things shouldn't be discussed in school.
Unfortunately, as high school teachers and administrators are aware, such things happen - if not in school (although sometimes, in fact, in school), in relation to it. The social structures constructed and enforced by and among students in high schools sometimes perpetuate sexual assault and silence concerning sexual assault. Class discussions of fiction about the problem are one way to get students to consider the problem and think about ethical behavior.

I would want my kid to participate in that discussion if it was going on - not because I want him to have his nose ground into horrifying reality, but because I want him to know that sexual assault and the aftermath of assault are problems in this culture, and to think about himself and his actions in relation to that fact.

I haven't read Speak, but if I were a teacher, I'd be looking at:
The actual assault - who commits it, and who directly or indirectly enables it.
The affect of the assault upon the victim.
The effect of the assault (and the victim's inability to talk about it or report it) on other people in that social sphere.
post #30 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyofmany View Post
I think it'a wrong to discuss sexual asault and rape in a 9th grade classroom. That's my problem with it. I'm obviously not as free of a thinker as most here, and I believe such things shouldn't be discussed in school.
I realize this is my personal experience, but I was in 9th grade the first time a friend was raped (incidentally by an older, popular guy). She did speak up and no one believed her, and she was shunned by everyone, including the parents. I had a couple friends confide similar events to me later, but no one ever spoke up again.

I truly believe these issues are discussed in many schools at this age, outside of the classroom setting.
post #31 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyofmany View Post
I think it'a wrong to discuss sexual asault and rape in a 9th grade classroom. That's my problem with it. I'm obviously not as free of a thinker as most here, and I believe such things shouldn't be discussed in school.

Why? I don't mean to sound like a broken record or a 4 year old going through the "why" stage, but I am genuinely interested in your reasoning.

I think it's extremely important for young people to learn about sexual assault, harassment, and etc. They need to understand that it's not taboo and can and should be discussed.
post #32 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by bu's mama View Post
Since we're on the topic... Inexcusable by Chris Lynch is about rape from the boy's perspective & doesn't think he did anything wrong. It's not as good as Speak, but still pretty good & a very interesting perspective.
Thank you for recommending this. I hadn't heard of it before and it sounds really interesting.
post #33 of 128
I'm really interested in how your son feels? Do you censor what books he checks out of the library?
post #34 of 128
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnschoolnMa View Post

Why? I don't mean to sound like a broken record or a 4 year old going through the "why" stage, but I am genuinely interested in your reasoning.

I think it's extremely important for young people to learn about sexual assault, harassment, and etc. They need to understand that it's not taboo and can and should be discussed.
That's where I disagree. There's a time & place for things like that, but it's not at school, and not at that age.
post #35 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyofmany View Post
I think it'a wrong to discuss sexual asault and rape in a 9th grade classroom. That's my problem with it. I'm obviously not as free of a thinker as most here, and I believe such things shouldn't be discussed in school.
I understand having that feeling in elementary, but not at all in high school? It seems to be a very valid topic in high school. Many classic works of literature mention it in some form or another. Most school districts would not even TELL you, much less ask permission.

-Angela
post #36 of 128
Speak is one of my favorite teen lit books. It's really more about the girl finding her voice and being able to stand up for herself after this really awful thing happens to her in the beginning of the book. The author did a great job of depicting some of the emotional torture teens go through from their peers and themselves. It's not a book ABOUT rape, but that does happen in it.
post #37 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyofmany View Post
I think it'a wrong to discuss sexual asault and rape in a 9th grade classroom. That's my problem with it. I'm obviously not as free of a thinker as most here, and I believe such things shouldn't be discussed in school.
I just had to stop here and pull my jaw off the keyboard.

Are you naive? Do you really think that sexual assault and rape don't happen to 14 year olds?

I keep having to stop, and rewrite because what I want to say violates the U/A.

I'll say this: it is YOUR attitude, and the attitude of many people like you, which is the reason that so many young girls (and BOYS) are sexually assaulted and don't report it.

Please consider changing your tune. It is damaging...to EVERYONE...and helpful...to NO ONE.
post #38 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyofmany View Post
That's where I disagree. There's a time & place for things like that, but it's not at school, and not at that age.
So....why not? Do you think 14 year olds don't get assaulted?

HOnestly, reading what you are writing is making me absolutely. livid.
post #39 of 128
To butcher a favorite catchphrase: Won't it be a glorious day when schools freely teach deep, thoughtful literature that gets to the heart of the human experience, and they have to send home permission slips to read The Babysitters Club and Sweet Valley High?
post #40 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by paquerette View Post
To butcher a favorite catchphrase: Won't it be a glorious day when schools freely teach deep, thoughtful literature that gets to the heart of the human experience, and they have to send home permission slips to read The Babysitters Club and Sweet Valley High?
:

And even more, Gossip Girls and those other disgusting series that are all the rage now.

To the OP -- I am someone who believes in sheltering my children; why is it that they have to grow up so quickly these days? Nonetheless, I think that highschool is an appropriate time to be exposed to what really goes on in this sometimes ugly world, be it poverty, war, sexual abuse or whatever.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Preteens and Teens
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › Preteens and Teens › Issue in English class