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Do you "make" your kids brush their teeth? - Page 2

post #21 of 118
Yes, I require it. Twice daily for my oldest, and at least at night for the younger ones. It's not optional, and if my oldest balks, I'll do it for him (he's 7). If my kids are acting funny about it, it's b/c they either have a canker, a loose tooth or something else inside their mouths, and I want to know about that. I

For my preschooler with sensory and other issues, toothbrushing isn't easy. We use a non-flouride toothpaste since he can't yet spit, and I do all the brushing. I never get more than 30 seconds of brushing, but it's important to me, and he's learning to care for his personal hygiene, which is also important. I allow them to choose their own toothpaste so they're using something they like, they pick out their own toothbrushes and it's simply part of our daily routine.

To me, oral hygiene isn't something I'm willing to allow my children to choose or not. If I let my child go to bed with food stuck in his teeth and that contributes to cavities, then I've fallen down on my job. If I gently enforce a simple 90 second event that prevents cavities, painful dental visits and money out of my pocket, and it works, then I've done my parental job well.
post #22 of 118
I do make my children brush their teeth. My older has had several cavities, and has had to have a tooth removed. Let me say that making them brush their teeth is easier than making them sit in a chair with only a local anesthetic and getting a tooth yanked.
post #23 of 118
We try every night. We usually get some brushing done every day. I think it's good to have that routine in place. That said, some nights the brushing time is very very short. Some nights we do it more thoroughly.

I do most of the brushing for my 3.5 year old at this point. Soon I will want him to brush on his own but he dawdles a lot! I think we'll change over when he starts preschool for him to do his own brushing. I'm hoping we can make it really fun and positive for him.
post #24 of 118
Yes, I do. My kids are young enough that the idea of cavities and dental work is extremely abstract compared to "I-don't-want-to-right-now." I don't want them to suffer for their ignorance.

Besides, if they need dental work, they aren't the ones who have to pay for it ...

dm
post #25 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by queenjane View Post
i'm pretty shocked that everyone thinks that the right thing to do.
You've been around here for 4 years and you're still "shocked" that people would requite toothbrushing?



dm
post #26 of 118
Absolutely yes! at least 2x a day. It is a fight, but it's not negotiable around here. What I haven't gotten into the habit of is a flouride rinse... DS is old enough to handle it just fine (spitting out, etc) but we haven't gotten into the habit yet. Flossing we're also not great about yet. Although that's MY fault - the kids actually like it when I floss their teeth! go figure!
post #27 of 118
Yes. Dental hygeine is too important to overall health to let them think that brushing is optional.
post #28 of 118
I'm shocked that people wouldn't make their children brush their teeth. Seriously. If you as an adult know the ramifications of your child not brushing their teeth and you still don't require it? I find that shocking. I find it shocking that you would allow your child to engage in a behavior that could have long term health ramifications - poor dental hygeine is linked to a whole host of health issues - inflammatory diseases, heart disease etc... I think it's hugely irresponsible to not require your child to learn proper dental hygeine.
post #29 of 118
I make DD brush once a day. Probably should make her do it twice but I forget. I brush DS teeth once a day too. It's a struggle because he wants to do it himself somedays and others he won't let me in his mouth.
post #30 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcal View Post
poor dental hygiene is linked to a whole host of health issues - inflammatory diseases, heart disease etc... I think it's hugely irresponsible to not require your child to learn proper dental hygeine.
Yes, this is why it's not optional here. Last summer, my FIL got bacterial meningitis from an infection in his teeth, and almost died. My father has had gum surgery several times. To me, this is incredibly important preventative care, along with a good diet.
post #31 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by delly View Post
What I haven't gotten into the habit of is a flouride rinse
I would avoid that! My parents did that to me, it stained my teeth, and I was teased mercilessly by other kids. As and adult I finally got my teeth bonded because they were so ugly.

The fluoride in water and toothpaste (if you use fluoridated toothpaste) is more than enough.

We use unfluoridated toothpaste and my kids have never had cavities.

dm
post #32 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by amcal View Post
I'm shocked that people wouldn't make their children brush their teeth. Seriously. If you as an adult know the ramifications of your child not brushing their teeth and you still don't require it? I find that shocking. I find it shocking that you would allow your child to engage in a behavior that could have long term health ramifications - poor dental hygeine is linked to a whole host of health issues - inflammatory diseases, heart disease etc... I think it's hugely irresponsible to not require your child to learn proper dental hygeine.


oh, ahem...sorry.

That just cracked me up.

Its teeth brushing. People that brush their teeth still get cavities, still have problems with their teeth. There are other ways to protect ones dental health than brushing your teeth every day.

That being said, if you can't see that you can help your child "learn proper dental hygiene" without holding down, say, a 7 yr old and forcing a tooth brushing session, then...well....

Try that with a fourteen yr old. Yeah, good luck with that!!


Katherine
post #33 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by odenata View Post
Yes, this is why it's not optional here. Last summer, my FIL got bacterial meningitis from an infection in his teeth, and almost died. My father has had gum surgery several times. To me, this is incredibly important preventative care, along with a good diet.
Your FIL doesnt brush his teeth??

Katherine
post #34 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by dharmamama View Post
You've been around here for 4 years and you're still "shocked" that people would requite toothbrushing?



dm
Well i try to stay out of these threads, as they are so mind boggling to me....but it was late and i was weak! Maybe not "shocked" but "saddened and dismayed" ?

:


Katherine
post #35 of 118
We do "require" toothbrushing but honestly if it has always been done it is sort of expected and no one makes a fuss. I can't see it as a big deal. But if it were I would still do it; just like being buckled in a car seat is not something you have a choice about.

That said, electric toothbrushes, good tasting "paste", and routine can make this not a big deal (if a child doesn't have sensory issues anyway).

FWIW, plaque and gum issues have implications way beyond teeth--into your heart health too. And putting my child through anesthesia and trauma to fill a cavity is something I want to avoid if I can. Though I think you can do everything right and still have cavities as you've just got weak teeth; you can also have great teeth genetically and not take care of them and get cavities (my dad is proof as are some kids I know).
post #36 of 118
I sure do, it's non negotionable. Now that he's older he doesn't fight it anymore.
post #37 of 118
He has to brush his teeth everyday, there are exceptions though.
Like when he falls asleep right when we get home, I think it would be evil to wake him up just to torture him.

However, being conscious of what he ate during the day plays a big role in deciding to brush or not. I let him know that if he eats candy at grandma's he will have to brush his teeth because the candy will make holes in his teeth. I think this helps him understand the "why" and know that candy is mean to your teeth.
post #38 of 118
Oh, hell yes I require toothbrushing. Having DS cry or be upset is MUCH preferable to having him put out for fillings (and he would need general anaesthesia). Lo, and behold, the kid's teeth aren't gunky and covered in plaque!
I don't think it will be a problem when he's a teen, because it's been required his whole life. Plus, peers finding his unbrushed teeth gross will be more effective than me nagging him.
post #39 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by queenjane View Post
Your FIL doesnt brush his teeth??
He didn't take good care of his teeth, no. It's about a combination of things - good diet, dental visits, and yes, teeth brushing and flossing. Sorry, but I'm not going to leave one of them out just because my daughter doesn't always feel like it. I don't let her choose whether or not to be in a carseat, either. I put her health and well-being above temporary desires. Yes, kids who brush can still get cavities. Kids in carseats can still get injured. But it makes it less likely to happen, and that makes it worth it to me.

That said, we worked hard at making it something she wants to do and not making it a power struggle.
post #40 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by queenjane View Post


oh, ahem...sorry.

That just cracked me up.

Its teeth brushing. People that brush their teeth still get cavities, still have problems with their teeth. There are other ways to protect ones dental health than brushing your teeth every day.

That being said, if you can't see that you can help your child "learn proper dental hygiene" without holding down, say, a 7 yr old and forcing a tooth brushing session, then...well....

Try that with a fourteen yr old. Yeah, good luck with that!!


Katherine

How exactly can you have good dental hygeine without brushing your teeth? I would love to see just one study that suggests there are ways to care for your teeth that don't involve brushing.

And holding down a 7 or 14 year old? Seriously? I can not imagine being so permissive that I would ask my children to brush their teeth, they would say no and I would say "Oh, well, ok then" Seriously. Parenting. What I say goes in regard to serious health issues. You will wipe your behind after poop, you will brush your teeth, you will bathe. These are givens. They are not options. I can't imagine having such lack of authority in my own home that I would tell my children it's time to brush their teeth and they wouldn't.
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