or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Rh Negative

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I'm Rh negative. With my son I got the Rhogam shot during (I believe) my 28th week. I didn't have to get the other half of it when he was born because he's also Rh negative.

Well my new OB doesn't like to give the Rhogam shot unless absolutely necessary. BUT I have no idea whether or not my husband is neg or pos. He doens't know either and we can't get ahold of his mom (long story) to ask her. I'm going to try and get ahold of his dad although we highly doubt he'll know either.

Should I just get the shot if we can't figure out his blood type? I'm sort of torn because I don't know if there's any neg side effects of getting the shot when it's not needed. But then again I don't want something to happen to me or this new baby due to me being Rh neg...

Thanks!
post #2 of 27
My understanding is that since you did not require a rhogam shot after your first pregnancy because of the babies blood type your ok this pregnancy and will only require a rhogam shot if the baby you are pregnant with has a positive blood type and it would actually be to protect the next baby. Your body has built up no antibodies against the little one you are pregnant with because your first one's blood type was negative. This would only not work it you have had a miscarriage between these babies and the miscarried baby had a positive blood type. Did that make sense? I am guess what I am trying to say is that you only require a rhogam shot if this baby comes out with a positive blood type and the shot will protect the next baby. You will have 72 hrs. after the birth to get the rhogam shot if needed.
post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by rosehillworks View Post
My understanding is that since you did not require a rhogam shot after your first pregnancy because of the babies blood type your ok this pregnancy and will only require a rhogam shot if the baby you are pregnant with has a positive blood type and it would actually be to protect the next baby.
This is only partially true. Yes, the shot is given primarily to protect the next baby, but it should be given during pregnancy because sensitization can occur then (as well as again after the birth, if the baby is positive). If you wait until after the baby is born, and it is Rh+, you could already be sensitized.

Can you get your DH blood-typed?
post #4 of 27
Yeah, I would just suggest getting you DH's blood type checked again since you can't find out from his mother.
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trillian View Post
Can you get your DH blood-typed?
Maybe... Have any idea how much that'd cost?? Maybe I can get him to see if it's in any of his medical records. Hmmm.... Thanks for the idea!
post #6 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDFanatik View Post
Maybe... Have any idea how much that'd cost?? Maybe I can get him to see if it's in any of his medical records. Hmmm.... Thanks for the idea!
Have him donate at a Red Cross blood drive. After you make your first donation, you will receive a Red Cross donor card that tells you your blood type. You will know his blood type and he can give to a worthy cause!
post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDFanatik View Post
Maybe... Have any idea how much that'd cost?? Maybe I can get him to see if it's in any of his medical records. Hmmm.... Thanks for the idea!
The Eldoncard blood typing kit from www.inhishands.com is only $6.00 and gives blood type including Rh factor.
post #8 of 27
Blood typing shouldn't be too expensive, because as a pp mentioned, blood donors all get typed. And we even tested our own in class in junior high (I bet they don't do that any more!).
post #9 of 27
This topic is one I have researched about quite a bit, and written a couple of articles on.

First. Rhogam during pregnancy does not grant you protection for the durationg of your pregnancy, and it certainly doesn't give you any protection if you've been exposed to Rh+ cells before the shot.

Well, that's not entirely true...if you were exposed to the cells within 72 hours before the shot, it will protect you. Or if you get exposed within 72 hours after the shot. But what happens during the countless other hours of pregnancy...?

Obviously my own personal belief is shining through here. I feel like if you have some sort of trauma - amnio, external version, auto accident, bad fall, etc. etc. Rhogam might be warrented. But otherwise, it is a human blood product injected into you rather arbitrarily, "just in case" something happens to cause yours and baby's blood to mix within 72 hours.

Now after birth... You KNOW when birth happened. You can *get* a shot within 72 hours of birth, when there was a slight chance of yours and baby's blood mixing. Slight. Increases as interventions go up. But still a slight chance even with a "perfect" natural birth. IMO, all babies should have their cord blood typed right away so you have time to make that choice.

I think every woman needs to carefully examine the facts. Read the Rhogam fine print. Visit the March of Dimes to learn about Rh disease. Ask you doctor what happens if you get the shot at 28 weeks and then at 38 weeks your blood mixes with the baby's and for some reason nobody noticed.

Anyways, my own personal choice is to decline prenatal Rhogam. I have my baby's cord blood typed. And I have had three very great homebirths, but having had three Rh+ babies I have still opted to bend on over and let them give me that big old shot in the rear, just in case.

Here's one of my articles
post #10 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the responses ladies! I'll check and see if I can find a red cross place to doante at if we can't find out from anyone else what hubby's bloodtype is.

And Kristen, thanks for the article!! I'll definately look into it more and discuss it in depth with my OB & doulas! Loved the article btw!
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by NDFanatik View Post
And Kristen, thanks for the article!! I'll definately look into it more and discuss it in depth with my OB & doulas! Loved the article btw!
Glad it was helpful, and like I say in there, just use it as a jumping off point for your own research. I really think it's like most pregnancy care issues - you need to gather facts and consider what is right for you and your baby!
post #12 of 27
We are also waiting to find out DH's blood type because I'm Rh-. I'll be declining the 28wk injection though. It's just not very necessary. The chances of your blood mixing with the baby's is so slim. You're really only at risk if you're having CVS, amnio, or have direct trauma to the abdomen. If I remember my research correctly, if you only have the one at birth (with a + baby) chances of problems is about 2% and if you have the one at 28wks also it only decreases to 1%. Not very significant especially if you aren't having any invasive testing done. In my reading I found that the 28wk one is more of a thing done in the U.S. as a precautionary thing to help decrease legal risk to doctors. Typical US maternity care.

ETA: Yes, the injection has to be given within 72 hours of the "trauma" but it lasts for 12wks, not 72 hours. That's why they give it at 28 and 40wks.
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skrimpy View Post
This topic is one I have researched about quite a bit, and written a couple of articles on.

First. Rhogam during pregnancy does not grant you protection for the durationg of your pregnancy, and it certainly doesn't give you any protection if you've been exposed to Rh+ cells before the shot.

Well, that's not entirely true...if you were exposed to the cells within 72 hours before the shot, it will protect you. Or if you get exposed within 72 hours after the shot. But what happens during the countless other hours of pregnancy...?

Obviously my own personal belief is shining through here. I feel like if you have some sort of trauma - amnio, external version, auto accident, bad fall, etc. etc. Rhogam might be warrented. But otherwise, it is a human blood product injected into you rather arbitrarily, "just in case" something happens to cause yours and baby's blood to mix within 72 hours.

Now after birth... You KNOW when birth happened. You can *get* a shot within 72 hours of birth, when there was a slight chance of yours and baby's blood mixing. Slight. Increases as interventions go up. But still a slight chance even with a "perfect" natural birth. IMO, all babies should have their cord blood typed right away so you have time to make that choice.

I think every woman needs to carefully examine the facts. Read the Rhogam fine print. Visit the March of Dimes to learn about Rh disease. Ask you doctor what happens if you get the shot at 28 weeks and then at 38 weeks your blood mixes with the baby's and for some reason nobody noticed.

Anyways, my own personal choice is to decline prenatal Rhogam. I have my baby's cord blood typed. And I have had three very great homebirths, but having had three Rh+ babies I have still opted to bend on over and let them give me that big old shot in the rear, just in case.

Here's one of my articles
This is pretty much exactly how I feel about it. I'm glad to see someone who's research has produced the same decision.

I have to say, you saying "big old shot in the rear" made my heart skip a beat. I don't do well with needles (as many of you know) and I'm only considering agreeing to it because it's an in and out thing and not like an IV or a blood draw. And of course if baby is + then I understand the necessity even though the risk is still small. Can you tell me more about the experience? Is it painful like a tetanus booster? Does it take long for it to be injected? Does it have to be given in the buttocks? Do you have to stand for it?
post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TaraRae82 View Post
Can you tell me more about the experience? Is it painful like a tetanus booster? Does it take long for it to be injected? Does it have to be given in the buttocks? Do you have to stand for it?
Well I only had the one at 28 wks with my son but it's the same as the one that you get later on. It didn't hurt at all. But this is also coming from someone with 16 piercings, lmao. But in all seriousness (is that a word?) it doesn't hurt. Just a little poke. Nothing like a tetnus shot. Not IMO anyway.
post #15 of 27
I also am RH- and I had the Rhogam shot when I had a m/c with my last baby 2yrs ago. It didn't hurt anymore than a regular shot. I found that article Kristen posted very interesting -especially the point made that 2 RH- people can make a RH+ baby. We had DH tested a few days ago through his primary care dr to see what his blood type is, but my mw and my preg books all said if he is RH- then we don't need to worry. Has anyone else heard opposite of that?
post #16 of 27
It is totally easy to find out his blood type - a quick trip to the clinic! I would do that and then only get the shot if it turns out he is.
post #17 of 27
I really don't want to scare you TaraRae, but I have had the shot 3 times and each time it killed me. I guess I don't have shots that often (and only a few piercings, NDFanatik ) so I'm probably just a total pansy! But I could feel all that stuff spreading through my arm and a ton of pressure. Is that how all shots feel? I haven't gotten anything but those in probably 10 or 15 years!
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by love14 View Post
I also am RH- and I had the Rhogam shot when I had a m/c with my last baby 2yrs ago. It didn't hurt anymore than a regular shot. I found that article Kristen posted very interesting -especially the point made that 2 RH- people can make a RH+ baby. We had DH tested a few days ago through his primary care dr to see what his blood type is, but my mw and my preg books all said if he is RH- then we don't need to worry. Has anyone else heard opposite of that?
I have never heard this. I thought that 2 Rh- people couldn't make an Rh+ baby. My OB also said if DH is - then we won't have to worry and everything's fine, no Rhogam. But, I suppose it's like anything else in genetics. 2 brunettes can have a blonde baby if they're both heterozygous (sp?) for brown hair. I'll have to ask my Dad what his blood type is. My Mom is +.
post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TaraRae82 View Post
ETA: Yes, the injection has to be given within 72 hours of the "trauma" but it lasts for 12wks, not 72 hours. That's why they give it at 28 and 40wks.
I didn't think it lasted that many weeks - but the 72 hours is about how long you have to get it within. I mentioned that because say some trauma occurs at 26 weeks and then your doctor does the routine "just in case" shot at 28 weeks...well that's to late for you. Though hopefully anything that happened to cause blood to mix would also cause you to take yourself in to get the shot...but if it didn't.

Do you have a link about the 12 weeks of protection? I'll have to look more into that. I was thinking it only gave a couple of weeks of protection.
post #20 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TaraRae82 View Post
This is pretty much exactly how I feel about it. I'm glad to see someone who's research has produced the same decision.

I have to say, you saying "big old shot in the rear" made my heart skip a beat. I don't do well with needles (as many of you know) and I'm only considering agreeing to it because it's an in and out thing and not like an IV or a blood draw. And of course if baby is + then I understand the necessity even though the risk is still small. Can you tell me more about the experience? Is it painful like a tetanus booster? Does it take long for it to be injected? Does it have to be given in the buttocks? Do you have to stand for it?
It was uncomfortable. I don't *think* you have to be standing - I don't remember standing for my 1st one, though I did for babies #2 and #2. I think all of them were in my rear though. It was a big shot and I remember being sore, but I was also a bit sore all over from having given birth too so it wasn't as big of a deal. I don't remember it taking very long though. I had my midwives give it to me all three times though, and they helped me remember to relax, etc. I'm a little more worried about this time as I'll have to go into outpatient at the hospital to get it done and hope I don't get a brusque nurse.

It was unpleasant for me but overall not bad or really scary. I don't well with needles either and this wasn't too bad, especially not compared to what I'd been through the day before
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: October 2008