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Why are people stockpiling? - Page 2

post #21 of 90
I stockpile now because of MDC I had never thought of it before (except, of course, having enough for about 5-days - earthquake, power outages).

Now our pantry is full of rices, beans, flours, canned tomatoes, packaged tuna and salmon, crackers, granola, bottled water, nuts, pastas, canned fruits and veggies, etc. I think we could go about 3 months now and are aiming for more. Our freezer also has tons of meat. We have a huge pantry and large garage full of shelves and drawers, so we plan to have it all filled up by the end of summer.
post #22 of 90
I've always stockpiled for many years. It keeps my grocery budget down. I really never gave it much thought in the past. I do it more now because I want of the increasing prices of groceries. I think prices are going to go up even more now with increasing oil prices. It eventually has to trickle down and I don't want to be caught off guard when it does.
post #23 of 90
I have built up my pantry for several reasons, I think it's a good idea to have enough food on hand to survive an emergency, and it saves a lot of money over the long run to stock up when things are on sale so you don't have to pay full price for them if you need it when it's not on sale. As for stockpiling large quantities of food in case of an extended emergency (or the collapse of society as we know it, or any other major catasrophe) I haven't gotten to that yet, because we don't have the space for that kind of supply, but I do think it's a good idea if you have the room because you never know what the future holds, and I'd guess a lot of people just think you can't be too prepared, ykwim?
post #24 of 90
We stockpile for a number of reasons, first and most importantly to us is the savings in $$. We grocery game (it works for us) and many many things are free or close to free. 2nd if a couple kids are sick im not going anywhere and having 'inventory' reduces stress
3rd, if we have a tight $$ month i dont have to stress over feeding the family.
4th just being prepared, i hate not to have something.
post #25 of 90
I grew up with my parents growing canning and freezing. We always had an extra freezer full of food and shelves of canned goods and canned food from the store. My parents were frugal and I try to be too. A few years ago, I was bad, I'd stop at the grocery store on the way home from work and wander around till something sounded good. Now with 2 kids and being a sahm that isn't practical or frugal. So I bought wheat berries and a grinder (I love making bread anyway and the cost of the wheat I was buying has almost doubled in the last month). I figure I'm locking in prices. Besides what other investment will double in value that quickly in this economy? We're also going to buy a freezer with our stimulus $ and stock up on fruit and veggies from the farmer's market this summer. I figure if I go toward the end of the day, I'll probably get good deals on stuff they don't want to haul back home. I'll have to get it in the freezer right away, but that's ok. I figure it will save us money all winter long. Plus winter can be pretty harsh here so if I have enough food on hand, I won't have to go out for groceries during a snowstorm or we'll have food and won't have to fight the crowds who go to the store to try to stock up the day before a storm. I guess there are a lot of reasons.
post #26 of 90
I don't stockpile, I need a reason to get out of the house and hit the store at least once a week . I do try to buy on sale and find the best deals.
post #27 of 90
I grew up with a mother who NEVER kept back-ups in the household and I hated it when we'd run out of something. We lived way out in the country and both parents worked so there were days when the kids would have to make due without something.

So...I started keeping extras on hand LONG before I stockpiled.

Now we have 2-3 of every food we regularly use and we have much larger amounts of staples. I'm moving toward a year's supply.

I think it makes sense for so many reasons:

- in case of job loss you have food to feed your family

- in case of economic downturns you have a back-up source of food to help you weather the increased prices for a while

- in case of natural disaster that might cut you off from food sources (blizzards, ice storms in my part of the country) you have food in your household

- in the rare case of interruptions to food deliveries you'd have food on hand
post #28 of 90
Kari, my parents ran out of everything all the time, too. So that's part of my reason for keeping two backups of everything.
post #29 of 90
I try and wait until stuff goes on sale, really cheap, and then buy a whole lot of it to have on hand. That way I'm not driven to paying regular prices for stuff.

Also, I think having a supply of non-perishable food on hand makes sense in the case of any kind of disaster.

Plus, if prices are going to continue to rise, I'll buy up a lot of the stuff we use a lot of, and avoid paying higher prices later.

I don't have to do last-minute runs to the store for stuff I don't have on hand. That saves gas and time, and is particularly necessary when you live a long way from an affordable store and you have a big burden of childcare and household work that keeps you busy.

Plus, we only have a steady income 10 months of the year, and we sometimes run short of money at the end of the two months we have no income, so it helps to have some stuff on hand.

A lot of my stockpiling, too, is garden produce, CSA produce, seasonal local produce, and locally raised meat, that we acquire in season and then preserve.

When I stockpile, though, I only buy stuff we normally use, and we rotate through it and replace it as we go, so stuff isn't sitting around for ages and ages. The exception is a small supply of dried and canned stuff that we keep expressly for emergencies. Like precooked canned veggies and meat-- we don't normally eat it, but if we couldn't use our stove or oven, or had no running water, or in some other public emergency, we want stuff that we can eat right out of the can or package, to make it through. We keep a few weeks of that kind of stuff on hand, too.
post #30 of 90
We've started stockpiling because it occurred to us we would be in big trouble if anything happened. Prices are already so high, it just makes sense for us.
post #31 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by katheek77 View Post
Velochic mentioned something a few weeks back about most people not having even a 2 week supply of food on hand, and I was floored. I mean, I understand most people don't have six months or something, but, everyone I knew growing up had at *least* 2 weeks worth of food in the house...even my best friend's family, and they were on welfare for a time...
We just can't afford it. I think although many people just don't think they need to stockpile, I also think many like us, want to, but can't afford it. We just don't have the $ to buy 30 of something when it's on sale.
post #32 of 90
I have always bought more than we need. I don't shop for the week (except fresh produce), I shop for as long as possible. So my week of grocerys may look strange. But I could possibly go up to a year without buying groceries if we were to be very frugal with our food. We're very low income but I could not afford to shop this way. I literally only buy what is on sale, unless it is something that never ever goes on sale (like the powdered skim milk, which I just spent $44 for 5kg, ouch!!). I had to puff up our grocery budget but I would rather buy now because prices ARE going up. I see it every week when I go shopping. EVERYTHING has to be shipped here since we are pretty remote where I live, although I can sometimes find local stuff, but not always cheaper. This fall I will be loading up on local foods and attempting to store for the coming year (we get lots of local berries and some other produce).

BTW, I had a mom who seemed to only buy for 6 days to stretch it to last 7 and it didn't work. I don't know how she did it as she bought a cart load every week, which we don't do, but food never lasted and we didn't eat much. I grew up foraging and digging clams and gathering mussels to cook on the beach since I was hungry a lot. Those skills may come in handy yet again (although the harbour is so polluted now I don't know if I dare eat what I can gather).
post #33 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melilot Boffin View Post
We just can't afford it. I think although many people just don't think they need to stockpile, I also think many like us, want to, but can't afford it. We just don't have the $ to buy 30 of something when it's on sale.
Well, even if I wanted to I couldn't - lack of space, for a start, 4 people in 2 bedroom apartment. Another problem is that the kind of food we eat most won't keep more than a few days. Apart from rice, beans, canned tomato and pasta I can't think of much that I could stockpile. It would be nice to have room for a chest freezer, but you can't stock much in the freezer cabinet above the fridge.
post #34 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
Well, even if I wanted to I couldn't - lack of space, for a start, 4 people in 2 bedroom apartment. Another problem is that the kind of food we eat most won't keep more than a few days. Apart from rice, beans, canned tomato and pasta I can't think of much that I could stockpile. It would be nice to have room for a chest freezer, but you can't stock much in the freezer cabinet above the fridge.
Any room under the bed?

And even though you generally eat fresh food, it's still not a bad idea to buy some canned food, just in case you ever need it.
post #35 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post
It would be nice to have room for a chest freezer, but you can't stock much in the freezer cabinet above the fridge.
FWIW, for a good while we had a medium-sized chest freezer in the living room of our 600sq ft apartment-- totally worth the loss of space, in my opinion! Though stuff did get stacked on top of it, which was annoying.
post #36 of 90
Stockpiling helps, when I run out of cash, I have enough food to feed us for a month.
post #37 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
Any room under the bed?
My mother would do this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by snanna View Post
FWIW, for a good while we had a medium-sized chest freezer in the living room of our 600sq ft apartment-- totally worth the loss of space, in my opinion! Though stuff did get stacked on top of it, which was annoying.
: I do agree though. It's the $ that stops us. I would put canning jars of food in the closet and bathroom cabinets. Boxes of pasta under the couch. Just wherever it needed to live. But sadly, no capital. I wish I had thought to use the stimulus package for this, as someone else here on this forum did. We used it for overdue bills, midwife fees, and homeschool and art supplies. So not wasted in the least, but ack, why didn't we think to just blow it all on reserves??? I feel like I missed the last boat!
post #38 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Melilot Boffin View Post
We just can't afford it. I think although many people just don't think they need to stockpile, I also think many like us, want to, but can't afford it. We just don't have the $ to buy 30 of something when it's on sale.
Would you be able to buy 1 extra when you are shopping? Perhaps you are buying canned tomatoes and they are on sale for 45 cents a can... buy one or two extra. Next shopping trip, you're buying dried beans on sale and grab an extra bag. That way you are spending only and extra $1 a week, but slowly building a stockpile. This is actually how *most* people do it. Slow and sensibly, not panic buying.
post #39 of 90
While I like the concept, in practice it doesn't work well for me. I just threw out a huge jug of honey I bought years ago that had crystalized, it was purchased in a plan for home breadmaking with my breadmaker. I did make some, but I got out of the habit, the honey crystalized and I got very tired of having to boil it for 30 minutes every time I wanted a teaspoon of honey and went out and bought a small bottle of fresh. This is just one example of how for me it generally ends up being a larger waste of money.
post #40 of 90
You can put crystallized honey in a sink of hot water to melt it.
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