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Pledge of Allegiance - Page 2

post #21 of 49
I've never heard of a Christian/Bible pledge either.

As for the POA, I hated it when I was a kid and refused to say it. My kids will learn it as a discussion piece, not as a rote memorization. Blech.
post #22 of 49
Yes, we say it. The kids memorized it because we put it on their bedroom wall (along with parts of the Constitution, the Gettysburg Address, and a periodic table of the elements...)

My kids also say the Pledge during martial arts class, along with a list of five tenets they are expected to live by, according to their martial art.

We also stand for the Star Spangled Banner, with our hands on our hearts, and I cry every time I hear it no matter what.

Our government is imperfect, and there is injustice and there are wrongs out there...but I still believe in the basic principles on which our country was founded, and I have a reverence for the *potential* for good and for justice which our country embodies.

I was also raised military, and not to stand for the pledge or the national anthem just doesn't make sense to me.

I'm an atheist, my husband is a Lutheran, we've never heard of Bible Pledges or anything like that.

love, penelope

love, penelope
post #23 of 49
Thread Starter 
wow I certainly got alot of responces I didn't expect to encounter. Thanks to everyone for their opinion. After hearing the reasons why some of you choose not to say it or have your children say it I was very very um surprised. Thanks so much for your imput. I believe that I will have my children start next year.
post #24 of 49
Surprised? I'm honestly totally curious- why did the responses surprise you? Which responses are surprising?
post #25 of 49
Just for those who might be interested


Pledge to the Christian Flag
I pledge allegiance to the Christian flag and to the Savior for whose kingdom it stands. One brotherhood uniting all Christians in service and in love.

Pledge to the Bible
I pledge allegiance to the Bible, God's holy word and will keep it a light unto my path, a lamp unto my feet and will hide it word in my heart that I might not sin against God.

And I don't know the pledge to the AWANA flag, though my children do participate in it.
post #26 of 49
No pledge here. When I'm in the U.S. I do stand for the Star Spangled Banner but do not think anyone should if they don't want to. My DS is very into the Revolutionary War and will sometimes march around waving the small American flag we have and say "hurray for liberty!" No, I did not teach him that!
The pledge, however, I just think is creepy.
post #27 of 49

the pledge

We do say the pledge. Not every day but probably about once a week. The kids like it and as we move all over (have only lived in U.S. for one year of their lives). They have quite an awareness of different countries, governments, flags and cultures. I want to make sure they know which country they 'belong' to, have an allegiance to an appreciation for standing up for our rights. Also, living all over the world really does give some perspective on the quality of life that the vast majority of Americans get to experience.
If we had adopted children from another country (we are considering this) we will teach them the history of their nation (good and bad) and to be proud of where they come from.
post #28 of 49
I'm uncomfortable with my kids reciting pledges mindlessly. It seems robotic or something.
post #29 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Needle in the Hay View Post
My DS is very into the Revolutionary War and will sometimes march around waving the small American flag we have and say "hurray for liberty!"
post #30 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eris View Post
Surprised? I'm honestly totally curious- why did the responses surprise you? Which responses are surprising?
I'm surprised because I didn't realize honestly that opening a thread about the pledge would get this much responce. I was more thinking people would be like me & be like "oh no, we'e not that routine in our day for that" or " I've never thought about that either". I guess because I am from, live, & believe conservatively ( small town south) with one cousin who gave his life to this war, two more cousins presently on their 3rd & 4th tour & a little brother who just made 2nd leutinant I forget that there are those outside of my little bubble who think differently about this country, the flag, etc. I do respect everyones opinion, believe everyone is entitled to it, & the ability for all to have, express, believe, and share or opinions is what makes this country ( I said country not govenment) great.
post #31 of 49
No. We love our country but don't see a need to recite anything daily.
post #32 of 49
i have great respect for this country and the soldiers that have given their lives for us. i don't look at the pledge or star spangled banner as a government thing,but a soldier thing.....i quess that was how i was raised. to me it is more symbolic. i don't pile the kids and the dog around the flag and say the pledge.....i'm not sure why we should....it seems a little odd. i wonder what the dog would think a little. my 4 yr old does walk around belting out the star spangled banner at times and i have no idea where he has learned that! lol probably my mil trying to save my kids from not learning anything! LOL
post #33 of 49
Former military raising a mil.brat here.......

Absolutely NOT. No way.

I believe that a pledge should be an oath taken with the mind and spirit, with the intent to put into form the words that are being spoken.

Children are unable to comprehend fully the impact of a pledge and should not be forced to say one, nor encouraged to say one daily. If it truly is a pledge, then once suffices - we do not need to reaffirm our devotion every 24 hours. If such a thing is so important, than it should be the adults who are taking an oath each morning - fully competent human beings who understand what they are saying, not children who are encouraged to become parrots.

I also am uncomfortable with the many changes the pledge has gone through, even over the protests of the author. It doesn't seem to make sense to take a personal writing and butcher it.
post #34 of 49
I, too, see the pledge as somethings towards the country... not government and in recognition of our soldiers. Having been raised with a dad who was in Vietnam, Grandfather in WWII, Great Great Grandfather in WWI and my uncle about 4-5 generations back from the Civil War and so on and so on, I was raised to know the pledge as a tradition and then learned the meaning of it. DH's dad is retired navy, uncle was navy, grandfather is retired navy seal.. Our family has much respect for our military and love our country. We want our children to understand this. We also have our children learn Bible memory verses. We dont force anything though, if they dont want to do anything, we dont make them
post #35 of 49
I wouldn't even consider making my kids "pledge" something that they don't understand. The very thought creeps me out.

I choose not to pledge my allegiance to this (or any) country because to me that feels a lot like saying "My country, right or wrong." I will not ally myself with this country or government when it is doing something I am opposed to.

dm
post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyGrace View Post

I believe that a pledge should be an oath taken with the mind and spirit, with the intent to put into form the words that are being spoken.

Children are unable to comprehend fully the impact of a pledge and should not be forced to say one, nor encouraged to say one daily. If it truly is a pledge, then once suffices - we do not need to reaffirm our devotion every 24 hours. If such a thing is so important, than it should be the adults who are taking an oath each morning - fully competent human beings who understand what they are saying, not children who are encouraged to become parrots.

I also am uncomfortable with the many changes the pledge has gone through, even over the protests of the author. It doesn't seem to make sense to take a personal writing and butcher it.
ITA. I am not patriotic, so I myself stopped saying the pledge at school around 5th grade. But the daily recital has always kind of puzzled me, for the reasons stated above.

That said, my kids spent time in school and do know the pledge and I would not silence them if they felt the desire to recite it.
post #37 of 49
It never even crossed my mind. And now that it has, no. Have not and will not.
post #38 of 49
No, we do pray in the morning though.

Like some of the other posters, I am uncomfortable with children pledging allegiance to the USA. And as a Christian, I don't want my kids 1) feeling like they have to be loyal to anything other than God and 2) swearing oaths.
post #39 of 49
I have this pledge hanging in my kitchen and I do read it frequently to remind myself.

"I pledge allegiance to the earth and to the flora, fauna and human life that it supports. One planet indivisible, with safe air, water & soil, economic justice, equal rights and peace for all."

Blessings to all no matter what your opinion.

Kathi
post #40 of 49
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