or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › June 2008 Book Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

June 2008 Book Challenge - Page 7

post #121 of 165
It's been a slow summer on the reading front but I'm coming along.

#23 The Unofficial Guide to Walt Disney World 2008 by Bob Sehlinger
We're planning on hitting Disney world this year and I wanted some insider info. This guide was so incredibly thorough I feel like I've already been to Disney, died from exhaustion, and spent more money than I had. So I'm canceling my trip, lol. Just kidding. Really anyone considering a Disney trip and wants some insider info I would highly recommend this handy guide.

#24 Behind the Pine Curtain by Gerri Hill
This weekend a friend of mine who is a big Gerri Hill fan lent me two of her books to read through. She calls it "trash" but it's basically lesbian romance. The story started off great, the characters and plot totally drew me in but the ending was like walking into a brick wall. It just stopped. It was like the author was tried of writing and just ended it. I'm going to read the other one and then make a call on whether I'll read anymore of her books. I guess this would be a good, light, quick read. I read it in 2 days.
post #122 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by spiderdust View Post
Question: what if we cut-n-pasted a brief description of the book that someone else had written, like on Amazon, as well as whether or not we'd recommend it?

I usually do this, and then add a few words of my own. Just make sure that your quote from amazon stays within the posting guidelines (i.e., under 100 words of quoting); I've been asked to edit by mods before when just pasting the whole thing which is why I often use ... in the middle of the posts to edit out the fluff and just post a synopsis.
post #123 of 165
I think this is getting too complicated, personally. I've been in this thread since it was started by Mamabug as a way to motivate herself to read 100 books in a year - and it has evolved for some of us into a thread for book recommendations. I think each of us should be able to use the thread the way we like - as tool for keeping track of what we've read, keeping count, or just posting to give opinions.

I do appreciate it when people include whether or not they'd recommend a book but if they don't and I think I might be interested, I've just posted asking their opinion. If I have to go to amazon for every book I post - and I post a lot - and cut a paste a description - I would drop from the thread or just lurk because I'd rather spend my time reading . . . .

Hope I haven't offended anyone because really this is the only thread I go to regularly and I'd hate to lose it.
post #124 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by OMama View Post
Not sure if anyone else is on GoodReads (www.goodreads.com) but this is another site in which you can post your own reviews and then others can see them. As opposed to Amazon. Just a thought. Of course you would still have to write a review yourself, but I really like GoodReads. My bookclub uses it and now I have gotten my mom to sign up too.
Another good site is LibraryThing: http://www.librarything.com/

I like some of the features there better than GoodReads.
post #125 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
Hope I haven't offended anyone because really this is the only thread I go to regularly and I'd hate to lose it.
It certainly doesn't sound like we have consensus about any "rules" so I take that to mean we can all continue doing as we'd like. Please don't leave, anyone! I get great ideas for what to read from you guys.
post #126 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
I think this is getting too complicated, personally. I've been in this thread since it was started by Mamabug as a way to motivate herself to read 100 books in a year - and it has evolved for some of us into a thread for book recommendations. I think each of us should be able to use the thread the way we like - as tool for keeping track of what we've read, keeping count, or just posting to give opinions.

I do appreciate it when people include whether or not they'd recommend a book but if they don't and I think I might be interested, I've just posted asking their opinion. If I have to go to amazon for every book I post - and I post a lot - and cut a paste a description - I would drop from the thread or just lurk because I'd rather spend my time reading . . . .

Hope I haven't offended anyone because really this is the only thread I go to regularly and I'd hate to lose it.
Amen to all of that. Let's all follow the K.I.S.S. method and Keep it Simple Stupid. So, in that vein of thinking, let's not worry about the rules or guidleines or whatever and just post whatever you *@%&-well please and to spleef with the consequences.

So, here are the new modified guidelines for the Book Challenge:

1) Post the books you read ... or not
2) Post a recommendation ... or not
3) Number your book ... or not
4) Make a goal ... or not
5) Have fun with books (This one, unfortunately, is MANDATORY)


Can we all agree to these? Because, like Cathe, this is the only thread on MDC that I visit regularly and I'd hate to lose it.
post #127 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by snozzberry View Post
Another good site is LibraryThing: http://www.librarything.com/

I like some of the features there better than GoodReads.
We actually have a Library Thing Mothering Group: http://www.librarything.com/groups/motheringcom#forums
post #128 of 165
#21: The Fifth Vial by Michael Palmer
Another book from the library free table that looked like it might be pretty good. Honestly, it was difficult to get into but about half way through it started getting pretty interesting. It is about organ theft based on a caste system.

2008 Book Challenge: #1. Tuesdays with Morrie (Albom); #2. Searching for the Sound My life with the Grateful Dead (Lesh); #3. Fastfood Nation (Schlosser); #4. Along Came a Spider (Patterson) #5. Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood (Wells); #6. The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) #7. The Poisonwood Bible (Kingsolver); #8. Twilight (Meyer); #9. New Moon (Meyer); #10. Eclipse (Meyer); #11. Eat, Pray, Love (Gilbert); #12. The Golden Compass (Pullman); #13: The Subtle Knife (Pullman); #14: The Amber Spyglass (Pullman); #15: Outlander (Galbadon); #16: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Brashares); #17: Where are you now? (Clarke); #18: The Appeal (Grisham); #19: The Host (Meyer); #20: Summer Time (Rigbey)
post #129 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
We actually have a Library Thing Mothering Group: http://www.librarything.com/groups/motheringcom#forums
Oh, wow! I'm joining it right now! I was entering all of our books into LibraryThing.com a couple of weeks ago, but I filled up all of the spots for the free version! I need to pay for the full version so I can finish entering them in.
post #130 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by treemom2 View Post
#21: The Fifth Vial by Michael Palmer
Another book from the library free table that looked like it might be pretty good. Honestly, it was difficult to get into but about half way through it started getting pretty interesting. It is about organ theft based on a caste system.

2008 Book Challenge: #1. Tuesdays with Morrie (Albom); #2. Searching for the Sound My life with the Grateful Dead (Lesh); #3. Fastfood Nation (Schlosser); #4. Along Came a Spider (Patterson) #5. Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood (Wells); #6. The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) #7. The Poisonwood Bible (Kingsolver); #8. Twilight (Meyer); #9. New Moon (Meyer); #10. Eclipse (Meyer); #11. Eat, Pray, Love (Gilbert); #12. The Golden Compass (Pullman); #13: The Subtle Knife (Pullman); #14: The Amber Spyglass (Pullman); #15: Outlander (Galbadon); #16: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Brashares); #17: Where are you now? (Clarke); #18: The Appeal (Grisham); #19: The Host (Meyer); #20: Summer Time (Rigbey)
That sounds like something I need to look up!
post #131 of 165
#26 God Delusion (audio) – While there were many interesting facts and ideas in this book, I feel like I missed many of them because of the strange recording. The author and another person alternated reading, with often no reason why they would switch back and forth, and her voice was significantly louder than his. Also, the tracks often ended in the middle of a sentence making it difficult to stop and start. Someday I’ll pick it up again, but the paper version. There were a lot of ideas that I missed the first time around and would like a chance to consider them individually and at my own pace.
post #132 of 165
#33: Predictably Irrational, by Dan Ariely

Non fiction. This is an amazing book - a must-read for anyone who's interested in why and how people make decisions. The author is a professor of behavioral economics at MIT, and he discusses many experiments that he and colleagues do on decision-making and how it's affected by prices, emotions, and the influences of other people. Our decisions are not rational, but they often are predictably irrational (hence the title). Really cool stuff, and it will make you think about how you make your own decisions!
post #133 of 165
55. Rumspringa by Tom Shachtman
This one is about the running-around period that begins at age 16 when Amish youth are allowed to drive cars, listen to rock music, drink, smoke, etc. before they decide if they want to join the church for good or go out and live in the world and be shunned from the community. 90% eventually decide to join the church.

56. The Lady and the Unicorn by Tracy Chevalier
Historical fiction set in 15th century Paris about a painter who designs some tapestries and then gets caught up in some pretty tangled relationships with the women he is painting.
post #134 of 165
Dont go Cathe! I love to see what you have read, and I think what you posted sounds great

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
Amen to all of that. Let's all follow the K.I.S.S. method and Keep it Simple Stupid. So, in that vein of thinking, let's not worry about the rules or guidleines or whatever and just post whatever you *@%&-well please and to spleef with the consequences.

So, here are the new modified guidelines for the Book Challenge:

1) Post the books you read ... or not
2) Post a recommendation ... or not
3) Number your book ... or not
4) Make a goal ... or not
5) Have fun with books (This one, unfortunately, is MANDATORY)


Can we all agree to these? Because, like Cathe, this is the only thread on MDC that I visit regularly and I'd hate to lose it.
Sounds good to me

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
We actually have a Library Thing Mothering Group: http://www.librarything.com/groups/motheringcom#forums
Cool! I just joined goodreads yesterday, maybe I'll try this place out too :


#27 Taking Back Childhood by Nancy Carlsson-Paige

I really enjoyed this book. It seems like its going to be another book about the commercialization of childhood in the US, which I like to be informed about. But it gets better, it also includes a lot of information on how we can actively help our kids cope with the commercialization and raise them to be imaginative, empathetic and intelligent adults. Lots of great resources in the back too. Huge thumbs up, I might even buy this book, which is a lot for me, I'm a big library only kind of person.
post #135 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy926 View Post
#33: Predictably Irrational, by Dan Ariely

Non fiction. This is an amazing book - a must-read for anyone who's interested in why and how people make decisions. The author is a professor of behavioral economics at MIT, and he discusses many experiments that he and colleagues do on decision-making and how it's affected by prices, emotions, and the influences of other people. Our decisions are not rational, but they often are predictably irrational (hence the title). Really cool stuff, and it will make you think about how you make your own decisions!
This is my kind of book! Thank you for the explanation and rec.
post #136 of 165
I just joined the librarything as well. It looks cool! But I noticed there hasn't been much activity in the MDC group for a while. Maybe that will change. This thread seems much more active.
post #137 of 165
Thread Starter 
#65 Why War is Never a Good Idea
by Alice Walker
illustrated by Stefano Vitale

My review of Why War is Never a Good Idea can be found here.


#66 Spicy Hot Colors: Colores Picantes
by Sherry Shahan
illustrated by Paula Barragán

My review of Spicy Hot Colors: Colores Picantes can be found here.


#67 To Everything There is a Season
verses from Ecclesiastes
illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon

My review of To Everything There is a Season can be found here.


#1 The Time Machine, #2 The Shining (Audio): Redux, #3 Curious George, #4 Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, #5 The Tragedy of Othello, Moor of Venice (Bantam Anthology), #6 A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four, #7 "A Study in Emerald", #8 The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead, #9 Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them, #10 Quidditch Through the Ages, #11 On the Day You Were Born, #12 The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (Bantam Anthology), #13 The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare, #14 Rubyfruit Jungle, #15 John, Paul, George & Ben, #16 The Merchant of Venice (Bantam Anthology): Redux, #17 Dinotopia: A Land Apart from Time, #18 Trent's Last Case, #19 Cyrano de Bergerac: A Heroic Comedy in Five Acts, #20 Animal Dads, #21 Faggots, #22 A Day with Wilbur Robinson, #23 And Then There Were None, #24 Eating Between the Lines: The Supermarket Shopper's Guide to the Truth Behind Food Labels, #25 Henry IV, Part One, #26 Zami, A New Spelling of My Name: A Biomythography, #27 Twelfth Night, or What You Will (Bantam Anthology), #28 Murder Must Advertise, #29 Stagestruck: Theater, AIDS, and the Marketing of Gay America, #30 Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part One: Millennium Approaches, #31 The Tragedy of Macbeth (Bantam Anthology), #32 Stone of Destiny: The Story of Lady Macbeth, #33 Ian Pollack's Illustrated King Lear #34 Celtic Folklore Cooking, #35 Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part Two: Perestroika Revised Edition), #36 The Winter's Tale (Bantam Anthology), #37 Tolkien's Art: A Mythology for England, #38 The Body (Audio), #39 Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption (Audio), #40 Four Past Midnight: The Sun Dog (Audio), #41 The Tempest (Bantam Anthology): Redux, #42 World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, #43 Science Verse, #44 Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich and Other Stories You’re Sure to Like Because They’re All About Monsters and Some of Them are Also About Food. You Like Food, Don’t You? Well, All Right Then, #45 Case Histories, #46 Time Bandit: Two Brothers, the Bering Sea, and One of the World's Deadliest Jobs, #47 Why Pandas Do Handstands and Other Curious Truths About Animals, #48 Rolling the R's, #49 Spooky ABC, #50 A is for Arches: A Utah Alphabet, #51 Raven: A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest, #52 E is for Evergreen: A Washington Alphabet, #53 Beowulf (Longman Anthology), #54-60 The Harry Potter Series (Audio), #60 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Audio), #61 The Gingerbread Girl (Audio), #62 A Whale Hunt: Two Years on the Olympic Peninsula with the Makah and Their Canoe, #63 Heart-Shaped Box (Audio), #64 The Host, #65 Why War is Never a Good Idea, #66 Spicy Hot Colors: Colores Picantes, #67 To Everything There is a Season
post #138 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy926 View Post
#33: Predictably Irrational, by Dan Ariely

Non fiction. This is an amazing book - a must-read for anyone who's interested in why and how people make decisions. The author is a professor of behavioral economics at MIT, and he discusses many experiments that he and colleagues do on decision-making and how it's affected by prices, emotions, and the influences of other people. Our decisions are not rational, but they often are predictably irrational (hence the title). Really cool stuff, and it will make you think about how you make your own decisions!
I heard an interview with the author on CBC a month or so ago. It was a riot! Our local library has a copy so I'll have to check it out. Thanks for the reminder.
post #139 of 165
Okay, so what's the consensus? Goodreads.com or Librarything.com? I want to know what one I should actually spend time typing on.....:
post #140 of 165
#10 - Magic Street by Orson Scott Card

Mack Street, growing up in the middle-class black neighborhood where he was found abandoned as a baby, dreams about other people's wishes, discovers an entrance to Fairyland that no one else can see, and finds that he's at the center of a fairy conflict that is hurting people in his neighborhood. I liked it, though it didn't quite achieve the same level of "realness" as, say, Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell (a book featuring fairies and magic that I really, really liked.)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Books, Music, and Media
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › June 2008 Book Challenge