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June 2008 Book Challenge - Page 2

post #21 of 165
This thread inspired me to keep a reading log for myself (just as I do for ds's school). But here's what I'm reading now .I won't add numbers, since I don't know where I am...

-Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder - reading aloud with ds and we're both loving it
-The Dayuma Story - by ? Wallis...about a young female missionary to the Auca tribe of Ecuador in the 1950's (check out the movie End of the Spear)
-The Red Tent - 'reading' it on tape in the car
-A mystery by Diane Mott Davidson (can't remember the name)...reading it in the *ahem* library
-The NIV Bible on tape (I'm about 1/3 of the way through 2 Samuel)
post #22 of 165
I love The Red Tent! I had to read it earlier this year for a class.
post #23 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR'smama777 View Post
-The NIV Bible on tape (I'm about 1/3 of the way through 2 Samuel)
NIV?
post #24 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
NIV?
New International Version
post #25 of 165
#9 - Checkpoint by Nicholson Baker

Jay, who's a bit of a nut, explains to his friend Ben why he's determined to assassinate George Bush, while Ben tries to talk him out of it. This didn't get very good reviews when it came out, but I liked it.
post #26 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spiderdust View Post
New International Version
Gotcha!
post #27 of 165
I'm not sure what number I'm on so I won't put numbers next to these. I'll have to go back and look at one of the other months to see where I am. anyway....

Wicked - Gregory Maguire

The Birth House - Ami McKay

I'm off to get a new book from the library this afternoon when the kids wake up. I'm not really sure what though so I'm off to re-read this thread and check out CrunchyDaddy's book blog for suggestions!
post #28 of 165
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding - My SIL is a lactation consultant, who speaks highly of this book. I've been told by some on the MDC forums that there are better books out there, particularly if one is having problems with breastfeeding. Personally, I found that I learned a lot from this book about breastfeeding and parenting in general. My first child is due in October, so I'll be better able to judge the book after that point.

Now back to fiction!
post #29 of 165
#2.Embrace Me by Lisa Samson

From Amazon: "When a "lizard woman," a self-mutilating preacher, a tattooed monk, and a sleazy lobbyist find themselves in the same North Carolina town one winter, their lives are edging precariously close to disaster . . . and improbably close to grace."

I enjoyed the book. It was interesting but easy read. I did skim a little near the end but that is typical of me -- I get excited to read the next book.
post #30 of 165
#30: 700 Sundays, by Billy Crystal

This is a short autobiography/memoir, written in the form of a monologue. It almost seems as if Crystal spoke the entire thing into a tape recorder and then transcribed it. It's great stuff, though - his family sounds amazing (they started Commodore Records, among other things, and he grew up knowing Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday and all the jazz greats) and he is funny. I'd love to see this performed on stage.

(The title comes from the fact that because his dad worked 2 jobs, Billy could spend only Sundays with him. His dad died when Billy was 15, so they had about 700 Sundays together.)
post #31 of 165
The Host by Stephenie Meyer

This was a fun, enjoyable story. I struggled with the main character's motivation near the end of the story but it didn't matter in the end.

Stephenie Meyer does a super job of writing sexual tension. It's a little ridiculous how much I wanted everybody to just DO IT ALREADY! Whew.
post #32 of 165
#71 April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Death and How It Changed America by Michael Eric Dyson

Really good stuff. Talks about how MLK talked about death before he died. The author gives Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, and Barack Obama each their own chapter. The afterword is the author's imagining of an interview with MLK on the occasion of his 80th birthday. Very interesting book.
post #33 of 165
Behind the Scenes at the Museum, Atkinson

Quote:
"I exist!" exclaims Ruby Lennox upon her conception in 1951, setting the tone for this...novel in which Ruby at once celebrates and skewers her family. Peppered with tales of flawed family traits passed on from previous generations, Ruby's narrative examines the lives in her disjointed clan, which revolve around the family pet shop. But beneath the antics of her philandering father, her intensely irritable mother, her overly emotional sisters, and a gaggle of eccentric relatives are darker secrets--including an odd "feeling of something long forgotten"--haunt Ruby
Apparently I'm reading the wrong book by Kate Atkinson this month! It took me a bit to get into this one as there's a large cast of characters, but once I got into it I really enjoyed it and Atkinson's writing style. I have case histories on my shelf for sometime this summer.

#1-Garden of Beasts, #2-Passporter Guide to WDW, #3-Skylight Confessions, #4 - The Secret, #5 - The Kite Runner, #6 - Gone, #7 - Hidden Mickeys, #8 - Into Thin Air, #9 - Wolf Point, #10 - Ocean Breezes, #11 - Harmony Guide to Cables and Aran, #12 - East, #13 - Getting Started Knitting Socks, #14 - Keeping Faith, #15 - The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight, #16 The Big Nap, #17 - Grave of God's Daughter, #18 - Daddy's Girl, #19 - Behind the Scenes at the Museum
post #34 of 165
I read "Behind the Scenes" too - I remember liking it but not as much as this one.
post #35 of 165
"A Golden Age" by Tahmima Anam

This was pretty good -takes place in Pakastan during hte war of 1971 - a young widow trying to survive and keep her teenage kids safe.

"The Day I Killed James" by CAtherine Ryan Hyde

An 18 year old who can't live with the guilt after a guy she dated and cheated on killed himself.
post #36 of 165
3. Girls of Riyadh by Rajaa Alsanea

I would call this Arabic chick lit: Four Saudi women and the clash between their wants and their culture. Apparently it was banned in Saudi Arabia because it was considered too scandalous. As Amazon states, its pretty timid by Western standards. It was quick to read and I enjoyed it.
post #37 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
#71 April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Death and How It Changed America by Michael Eric Dyson

Really good stuff. Talks about how MLK talked about death before he died. The author gives Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, and Barack Obama each their own chapter. The afterword is the author's imagining of an interview with MLK on the occasion of his 80th birthday. Very interesting book.
I just read that when Barack Obama gives his acceptance speech for the Democratic Presidential Campaign at the DNC Convention in Denver, it will be on the 45th anniversary of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" Speech in Washington, D.C.

That's pretty darn cool!
post #38 of 165
12. Maya Running by Anjali Banerjee. I loved this book! Maya Running is a delightful funny coming of age tale of an Indian teen growing up in rural Canada in the late 1970s.
post #39 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
1.) Show me the way : a memoir in stories by Jennifer Lauck
Stories of Lauck's life post-kids interspersed with childhood stories. Lauck wrote two other memoirs about her dysfunctional (and abusive) childhood. This picks up when she is in her mid-30s and having her first child. You can see how her childhood plays into her doubts as a first time Mom. It was a quick read for me -- finished it in one day.

Oh, wow! I didnt know there was a third memoir of hers! I'll have to check that out. Do things keep getting better for her?

I'm reading Children of Men, Taking Back Childhood, and The True and Outstanding Adventures of the Hunt Sisters right now. Enjoying all 3

It's my turn to pick the book for my book club too. We bring 3 selections and the group votes on the pick. My options are The Teahouse Fire, The Saffron Kitchen and Nobody's Fool. I'm excited to present them, and am reading all 3 no matter which one we pick for the book club.
post #40 of 165
First of all, I have to second that I love Jim Dale! Peter Pan has always been my favorite story and I was delighted to see that he has narrated not only the HP books, but the old and new PP ones! It's amazing how much his vocal stylings match those of the HP actors.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crosscat View Post
The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding - My SIL is a lactation consultant, who speaks highly of this book. I've been told by some on the MDC forums that there are better books out there, particularly if one is having problems with breastfeeding. Personally, I found that I learned a lot from this book about breastfeeding and parenting in general. My first child is due in October, so I'll be better able to judge the book after that point.

Now back to fiction!
Hi! I'm in your DDC! So, of course, much of my recent reading has been of a similar nature. Make sure you pick up an Ina May before you burn out on baby books!
So far this month(ish):

Birth by Tina Cassidy
I love this book! I wasn't expecting to pick up a bunch of new info, so I was able to enjoy the way in which it was presented. It's also the only recent cultural history of birth that I've found.

Birthing from Within by Pam England
I had heard so many good things about this... The first half was painful to get through and the other half seemed somewhat useless. However, I could see this book being very useful to someone whose pregnancy has brought a yearning for new somatic respect and awareness that they never experienced before (much in the same way it has for me with green and food habits).

Raising Baby Green by Alan Greene
Although many of the ideas contained in this book are a little beyond my reasonable expectations, I love the information that I am able to use and the way in which it inspires me to pay just a little more attention.

The Knife Man by Wendy Moore
Oh heavens! This may be one of my favorite books of all time! Techinically, I haven't "finished" it yet, because I keep going back and re-reading it, hoping there's more. Of course, it helps that this is more my usual fare for reading while consuming all of these baby books!

Watch Your Mouth by Daniel Handler
This is the second time I've tried this author and I keep thinking that I like him, but I don't think I do. I'm more intrigued by why I don't enjoy him as much as I think I would than I am by his stories. I love his *ahem* other books under his pseudonym. Any insight, anybody?
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