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June 2008 Book Challenge - Page 3

post #41 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post
I'm reading Children of Men
Is that Children of Men as in the recent Julianne Moore-Clive Owen film? Or am I off by a factor of too-much-pop-culture?
post #42 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
Is that Children of Men as in the recent Julianne Moore-Clive Owen film? Or am I off by a factor of too-much-pop-culture?
Nope, you are correct. I had just heard that the book was different from the movie, and I was curious how it was different. People had also commented the ending was quite different, and that really piqued my curiosity, so I decided to check it out. It's a short book, so it isn't too much work to satisfy that urge.
post #43 of 165
"Riding Lessons" by Sara Gruen

This was by the author of Water for Elephants - about a women who had been a horse rider/competitor destined for the Olympics when she has a major accident. Although she eventually recovered, she refused to ride again - 20 years later, her dad is sick, she loses her job, and her husband leaves her - and she ends up back on the ranch. This was a good read.
post #44 of 165
4.The Endless Steppe by Esther Hautzig

True story of Polish Jews accused of being Capitalists by the Russian government and forced to move to Siberia during WWII. The story is told by the youngest character -- Esther. It doesn't get too in depth -- I think it listed as juvenile fiction at my library which may explain that. Still, I was interested enough to finish the book.
post #45 of 165
Finished reading Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling.

Currently reading Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay.

(How do I number these... by the number of books read this month or all year?)
post #46 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spiderdust View Post
(How do I number these... by the number of books read this month or all year?)
However you want. Some of us number by the year, some by the month, some not at all. So, it's up to you.

Mine are numbered by the year, because I made a goal of how many books I wanted to read this year, but - again - it's all up to however you want to keep track or not want to keep track.
post #47 of 165
#17: Where are you Now? Mary Higgins Clarke
#18: The Appeal John Grisham
Read both of these in the past two days. Honestly, I don't think I would recommend either one of them. Both books were not as good as previous ones by the authors. Now I am starting The Host by Stephenie Meyer

2008 Book Challenge: #1. Tuesdays with Morrie (Albom); #2. Searching for the Sound My life with the Grateful Dead (Lesh); #3. Fastfood Nation (Schlosser); #4. Along Came a Spider (Patterson) #5. Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood (Wells); #6. The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) #7. The Poisonwood Bible (Kingsolver); #8. Twilight (Meyer); #9. New Moon (Meyer); #10. Eclipse (Meyer); #11. Eat, Pray, Love (Gilbert); #12. The Golden Compass (Pullman); #13: The Subtle Knife (Pullman); #14: The Amber Spyglass (Pullman); #15: Outlander (Galbadon); #16: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Brashares)
post #48 of 165
#11 Drunk, Divorced & Covered in Cat Hair by Laurie Perry

I loved, loved, loved this book! A fast read, I read it in two days I think. Anyway, fast for me. Great knitting patterns in the back too. It makes me want to start up knitting for sure. I've tried several times without sticking to it. I think I need to actually go to a knitting group I joined.
post #49 of 165
"Where I'd Like to Be" by Frances O'Roark Dowell

Juv novel that my daughter told me I just "had" to read. I didn't find it as wonderful as she did. About some 12 year olds in a children's home - hoping to be adopted or reunited with parents.
post #50 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarmerCathy View Post
#11 Drunk, Divorced & Covered in Cat Hair by Laurie Perry

I loved, loved, loved this book! A fast read, I read it in two days I think. Anyway, fast for me. Great knitting patterns in the back too. It makes me want to start up knitting for sure. I've tried several times without sticking to it. I think I need to actually go to a knitting group I joined.
What a great title. I'll have to check it out.
post #51 of 165
#16 The Courtship by Gilbert Morris

This was the last book in a 4 part series that I am SO GLAD to be ending. It was about a family that had the worst luck, set during the depression. It is Cristian/Inspirational fiction, but the whole series was so repetitive that you could easily read book 4 and know what was in books 1-3 right down to the phrases. It got so bad that some of them where even repeated in the same book. I would hate to see what this guy does with a series of more than 4 books(which he does have).
post #52 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
What a great title. I'll have to check it out.
And you don't need to know how to or want to knit to find this book amusing.
post #53 of 165
Thread Starter 
#62 A Whale Hunt: Two Years on the Olympic Peninsula with the Makah and Their Canoe
by Robert Sullivan

My review of A Whale Hunt can be found here.

#1 The Time Machine, #2 The Shining (Audio): Redux, #3 Curious George, #4 Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, #5 The Tragedy of Othello, Moor of Venice (Bantam Anthology), #6 A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four, #7 "A Study in Emerald", #8 The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead, #9 Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them, #10 Quidditch Through the Ages, #11 On the Day You Were Born, #12 The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (Bantam Anthology), #13 The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare, #14 Rubyfruit Jungle, #15 John, Paul, George & Ben, #16 The Merchant of Venice (Bantam Anthology): Redux, #17 Dinotopia: A Land Apart from Time, #18 Trent's Last Case, #19 Cyrano de Bergerac: A Heroic Comedy in Five Acts, #20 Animal Dads, #21 Faggots, #22 A Day with Wilbur Robinson, #23 And Then There Were None, #24 Eating Between the Lines: The Supermarket Shopper's Guide to the Truth Behind Food Labels, #25 Henry IV, Part One, #26 Zami, A New Spelling of My Name: A Biomythography, #27 Twelfth Night, or What You Will (Bantam Anthology), #28 Murder Must Advertise, #29 Stagestruck: Theater, AIDS, and the Marketing of Gay America, #30 Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part One: Millennium Approaches, #31 The Tragedy of Macbeth (Bantam Anthology), #32 Stone of Destiny: The Story of Lady Macbeth, #33 Ian Pollack's Illustrated King Lear #34 Celtic Folklore Cooking, #35 Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part Two: Perestroika Revised Edition), #36 The Winter's Tale (Bantam Anthology), #37 Tolkien's Art: A Mythology for England, #38 The Body (Audio), #39 Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption (Audio), #40 Four Past Midnight: The Sun Dog (Audio), #41 The Tempest (Bantam Anthology): Redux, #42 World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, #43 Science Verse, #44 Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich and Other Stories You’re Sure to Like Because They’re All About Monsters and Some of Them are Also About Food. You Like Food, Don’t You? Well, All Right Then, #45 Case Histories, #46 Time Bandit: Two Brothers, the Bering Sea, and One of the World's Deadliest Jobs, #47 Why Pandas Do Handstands and Other Curious Truths About Animals, #48 Rolling the R's, #49 Spooky ABC, #50 A is for Arches: A Utah Alphabet, #51 Raven: A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest, #52 E is for Evergreen: A Washington Alphabet, #53 Beowulf (Longman Anthology), #54-60 The Harry Potter Series (Audio), #60 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Audio), #61 The Gingerbread Girl (Audio), #62 A Whale Hunt: Two Years on the Olympic Peninsula with the Makah and Their Canoe
post #54 of 165
#72 Murder at the Mendel by Gail Bowen
another in the mystery series set in Saskatchewan fairly intelligent stuff -- not total fluff.

#73 The Seventh Well by Fred Wander
Wander was a survivor of more than 20 concentration camps. This is a novel that is loosely based on his experiences.
post #55 of 165

yes, I read books by Jenny McCarthy

I had () already read her pregnancy book when it came out, but in light of her most recent, and more relevant, book I thought it would be interesting to go with her through her journey from a very controlled and mainstream pregnancy to a very tough situation that calls for more than following doctor's orders.

Belly Laughs and Baby Laughs are her first books, which she wrote immediately after those stages, with no view of what was coming next. I wouldn't recommend reading just these for fun. They're amusing, but her lack of information/education/choices are cringeworthy sometimes. They are good for some laugh out loud moments, though.

Louder than Words is an amazing book when read after the other two. It shows a loving, determined and intelligent mother's journey through a tiring maze of medical messes.

I really recommend taking in these three books. Even all of them at once is a pretty quick and light read.
post #56 of 165
#31: Love and Anger: The Parental Dilemma, by Nancy Samalin

Great book about how anger is normal when dealing w/our kids, and what to do about it. I'm hoping I can keep its words in mind far down the road, but I may need to read it again!

#32: The Battle of the Labyrinth (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, book 4) by Rick Riordan

Pretty good, though I wasn't all that into this one. There's one more in the series, but #4 just came out, so it will be awhile, I guess.

I also tried reading What is the What but couldn't get into it, despite hearing rave reviews. I think it's something about the way Dave Eggers writes, combined with the potentially depressing subject matter.
post #57 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancy926 View Post
[B]

I also tried reading What is the What but couldn't get into it, despite hearing rave reviews. I think it's something about the way Dave Eggers writes, combined with the potentially depressing subject matter.
You should try How we are Hungry instead. Short, funny stories...like "Your Mother and I" and "Naveed".
post #58 of 165
"The Color of Water" by James McBride

The author is the son of a Black man and Polish Orthodox Jew (who later converts to Christianity). He intertwines his stories of growing up in NYC with stories of her growing up in Virginia. A great read!
post #59 of 165
#20 - America: A citizen's guide to democracy inaction, Jon Stewart

Quote:
Cheeky, irreverent and playfully ingenuous, this abbreviated history of democracy is everything one would expect from the writers of Comedy Central's fake news program. The book is laid out like a textbook, with "Discussion Questions" ("Why do you think the Framers made the Constitution so soul-crushingly boring?"), "Classroom Activities" ("Using felt and yarn, make a hand puppet of Clarence Thomas. Ta-da! You're Antonin Scalia!") and plenty of amusing graphics, including a board game that resembles the game Life but which follows a presidential term.

While rather dated (lots of focus on the '04 election), there are still laugh-out-loud funny moments to this book. Stewart is a brilliant satirist, and I'm going to have to remember to watch his show as the election heats up this year.


#1-Garden of Beasts, #2-Passporter Guide to WDW, #3-Skylight Confessions, #4 - The Secret, #5 - The Kite Runner, #6 - Gone, #7 - Hidden Mickeys, #8 - Into Thin Air, #9 - Wolf Point, #10 - Ocean Breezes, #11 - Harmony Guide to Cables and Aran, #12 - East, #13 - Getting Started Knitting Socks, #14 - Keeping Faith, #15 - The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight, #16 The Big Nap, #17 - Grave of God's Daughter, #18 - Daddy's Girl, #19 - Behind the Scenes at the Museum, #20 - America
post #60 of 165
When You Are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris.

I had heard that this guy was funny. But oh my, was this a boring book. It kept leading up to funny, but.........wasn't funny. He kept telling parts of jokes, where the punch-line was clearly missing.

Even the NY Times reviewer disliked it:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/10/books/10kaku.html

"With many of these tales, the reader has the sense that Mr. Sedaris is scraping the bottom of the barrel for material, writing for the sake of producing another book, vamping for time instead of looking within or trying something new."


I'm glad I just checked it out of the library and didn't buy it!
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