or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › June 2008 Book Challenge
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

June 2008 Book Challenge - Page 4

post #61 of 165
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
When You Are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris.

I had heard that this guy was funny. But oh my, was this a boring book. It kept leading up to funny, but.........wasn't funny. He kept telling parts of jokes, where the punch-line was clearly missing.

Even the NY Times reviewer disliked it:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/10/books/10kaku.html

"With many of these tales, the reader has the sense that Mr. Sedaris is scraping the bottom of the barrel for material, writing for the sake of producing another book, vamping for time instead of looking within or trying something new."


I'm glad I just checked it out of the library and didn't buy it!
That's too bad, because he can be funny. Try Naked.
post #62 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
That's too bad, because he can be funny. Try Naked.
I love Naked! and Dress Your Family... maybe I'll just try this new one out at the library first too.
post #63 of 165
#17 Friends and Mothers by Louise Limerick

This book came up when I searched for books about postpartum depression at my library. Not exactly what I had in mind, but it was a quick read. It is about a group of women that meet regularly for coffee after dropping of their kids at preschool. One of them goes crazy and gives her baby away to a stranger and then refuses to tell anyone what happened. It was ok.
post #64 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
"The Color of Water" by James McBride

The author is the son of a Black man and Polish Orthodox Jew (who later converts to Christianity). He intertwines his stories of growing up in NYC with stories of her growing up in Virginia. A great read!

post #65 of 165
You Suck: A Love Story by Christopher Moore

Christopher Moore is a fun guy to read. This follow-up to Bloodsucking Fiends had fewer proofreading problems and I was grateful.
post #66 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellemarie View Post
You Suck: A Love Story by Christopher Moore

Christopher Moore is a fun guy to read. This follow-up to Bloodsucking Fiends had fewer proofreading problems and I was grateful.
I've never heard of either of these, but love them already by the titles!
post #67 of 165
"Agnes and the Hitman" by Jennifer Crusie and Bob Mayer

Well - this is not my usual type of reading but Bob Mayer is going to be the keynote speaker at my writers' conference this year so I wanted to check him out and I must say - I really enjoyed this book.

It's about a food writer "Cranky Agnes" who you just can't help but like who someone is trying to kill so her friend and ex mob guy/now diner owner Joey gets his nephew, a hitman for the government, to come protect her. And of course they fall in love. Way more killing and sex than I am used to but really, a very fun read.

"Living Dead Girl" by Tod Goldberg

Very good book about a guy still messed up about the death of his daughter trying to find his wife (who he has separated from but who has disappeared). Very well written.
post #68 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
When You Are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris.

I had heard that this guy was funny. But oh my, was this a boring book. It kept leading up to funny, but.........wasn't funny. He kept telling parts of jokes, where the punch-line was clearly missing.

Even the NY Times reviewer disliked it:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/10/books/10kaku.html

"With many of these tales, the reader has the sense that Mr. Sedaris is scraping the bottom of the barrel for material, writing for the sake of producing another book, vamping for time instead of looking within or trying something new."


I'm glad I just checked it out of the library and didn't buy it!

That IS too bad, I love David Sedaris! I think "Me Talk Pretty One Day" is pretty great too. You might enjoy that one, in addition to the others recommended.

#24 The Children of Men

Actually the story is different from the movie, and I think better. Isn't the book usually better? Anyway, for those who dont know, it's essentially the end of the world, as infertility has completely overtaken the human race and the last generation to be born is now in their 20's. Society has become quite different, basically, how to stay entertained and keep daily comforts in life accessible and working. The main character is cousin to the head of England and he becomes intertwined with a small revolutionary group who turn out just to be brought together because one of the women is pregnant.

#25 Playful Parenting

Nice concept, liked his approach, but the writing style and the format of the book was a little different than what I could stand reading right now. I skimmed most of it. I'm enjoying Taking Back Childhood much more.

#26 The True and Outstanding Adventures of the Hunt Sisters

Almost done, but I'm listing it now. I'm not sure I like the letter format for telling the story, but I'm curious what will happen to the characters, so I think I'll finish it.
post #69 of 165
#19: The Host by Stephenie Meyer
Enjoyed this book, though not as much as her Twilight Series. I wish she had ended the book a few pages earlier (like before the last couple chapters. . .if you read it you will know what I mean). I agree with a pp who said she really does write sexual tension well. I'm out of books again so I guess off to the free table for something that might spark my interest.

2008 Book Challenge: #1. Tuesdays with Morrie (Albom); #2. Searching for the Sound My life with the Grateful Dead (Lesh); #3. Fastfood Nation (Schlosser); #4. Along Came a Spider (Patterson) #5. Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood (Wells); #6. The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) #7. The Poisonwood Bible (Kingsolver); #8. Twilight (Meyer); #9. New Moon (Meyer); #10. Eclipse (Meyer); #11. Eat, Pray, Love (Gilbert); #12. The Golden Compass (Pullman); #13: The Subtle Knife (Pullman); #14: The Amber Spyglass (Pullman); #15: Outlander (Galbadon); #16: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Brashares); #17: Where are you now? (Clarke); #18: The Appeal (Grisham)
post #70 of 165
"The Adoration of Jenna Fox" by Mary E. Pearson

A futuristic book about a girl who comes out of a coma after being in a terrible car wreck and is trying to remember who she was and what she was like - but something's not quite right about what her parents are telling her.
post #71 of 165
#74 Gods Behaving Badly by Marie Phillips
Funny. Think it's been reviewed here before.
#75 Unconditional Parenting by Alfie Kohn
Love it.
post #72 of 165
#6 Death Gets a Time Out (Mommy Track series) by Ayelet Waldman.

Continuing series that is a great, fun read.
post #73 of 165
#20: Summer Time by Liz Rigbey
I was up until 2:30 this morning reading this book. It is about a woman's father who dies in CA while she is living in New York. They think it's a suicide but when she gets home she finds its really homicide. No one could think of anyone who would kill the dad. She starts investigating and finding out a lot of things about her family and its past. This book has a lot of cool plot twists, but I did find the author's descriptive details a little too much a lot of the time.

2008 Book Challenge: #1. Tuesdays with Morrie (Albom); #2. Searching for the Sound My life with the Grateful Dead (Lesh); #3. Fastfood Nation (Schlosser); #4. Along Came a Spider (Patterson) #5. Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood (Wells); #6. The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) #7. The Poisonwood Bible (Kingsolver); #8. Twilight (Meyer); #9. New Moon (Meyer); #10. Eclipse (Meyer); #11. Eat, Pray, Love (Gilbert); #12. The Golden Compass (Pullman); #13: The Subtle Knife (Pullman); #14: The Amber Spyglass (Pullman); #15: Outlander (Galbadon); #16: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Brashares); #17: Where are you now? (Clarke); #18: The Appeal (Grisham); #19: The Host (Meyer)
post #74 of 165
Ack! I've forgotten to update as I've read!

Here's what I've read so far this month (may have posted a couple already):

The Bonesetter's Daughter by Amy Tan

Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling.

Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay

Black Heart, Ivory Bones by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling

A Wolf at the Door and Other Retold Fairy Tales by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling

After the Baby's Birth: A Woman's Way to Wellness: A Complete Guide for Postpartum Women by Robin Lim

Henry IV, Part I by William Shakespeare
post #75 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathe View Post
"The Adoration of Jenna Fox" by Mary E. Pearson

A futuristic book about a girl who comes out of a coma after being in a terrible car wreck and is trying to remember who she was and what she was like - but something's not quite right about what her parents are telling her.
And...........what did you think of it? Good? Bad? Worth other people's time?
post #76 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by spiderdust View Post
Ack! I've forgotten to update as I've read!

Here's what I've read so far this month (may have posted a couple already):

The Bonesetter's Daughter by Amy Tan

Ruby Slippers, Golden Tears by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling.

Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay

Black Heart, Ivory Bones by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling

A Wolf at the Door and Other Retold Fairy Tales by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling

After the Baby's Birth: A Woman's Way to Wellness: A Complete Guide for Postpartum Women by Robin Lim

Henry IV, Part I by William Shakespeare

Any of these good, or worth other people's time?


To everyone, please remember that a recommendation (or not) is supposed to be part of this thread. Thanks.
post #77 of 165
#18 The Summer of Ordinary Ways by Nicole Lea Helget
This was a good, short little book of short stories. It is a memoir or a girl growing up in rural Minnesota in the 80's about her like. She grew up on a farm and had a large family. It is filled with stories of death and birth of animals and siblings and children. It ends up with a little bit about her and her sisters lives now, about depression and kinda getting out of the life your family makes for you. It was really good, I thought and I really feel like I know this author now and I want to make friends with her. She live in Minneapolis, maybe I should stalk her.
post #78 of 165
Quote:
Originally Posted by A&A View Post
Any of these good, or worth other people's time?


To everyone, please remember that a recommendation (or not) is supposed to be part of this thread. Thanks.
I was confused for a bit too, there are so many books listed and so many posts that don't say whether or not the book is worth the read.
post #79 of 165
I know I said I was going back to fiction, and I am reading number9dream by David Mitchell. A friend recommended it because I love Haruki Murakami soooo much. It's okay, so far, but not great enough to distract my pregnant self from BABY-RELATED BOOKS.

So I set the novel aside, and now I've finished up The Happiest Baby on the Block by Dr. Harvey Karp. The book is really well-organized, and Dr. Karp makes good arguments for the logic behind his baby-calming methods. The only drawback is that it doesn't seem like the baby-calming tricks really warrant an entire book - it could be summed up in a few pages really. To the author's credit, however, the book is pretty entertaining to read in spite of that. I can't vouch for how effective his methods are until October, I guess.
post #80 of 165
I'd just comment that there are times where I have time to post detailed posts and times when I don't -- but if I've been contemplating reading a book that someone else posts about, I can always post and ask them what they thought, for more details, etc. I do try to post plot summaries and reviews, but when I don't, I feel that others can always ask more questions...... ?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Books, Music, and Media
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Natural Living › The Mindful Home › Arts & Crafts › Books, Music, and Media › June 2008 Book Challenge