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Gregory- the bullet version story - Page 2

post #21 of 70
congratulations, mama

i'm glad to hear you didn't stay pregnant forever.
post #22 of 70
awesome!

Great job.

I understand about not feeling comfortable to post birth pics, but dang I want to know what a baby in the caul looks like! I guess I'll just have to hope that happens to me next time.

Congrats again!
post #23 of 70
Quote:
but dang I want to know what a baby in the caul looks like!
Google to the rescue

http://images.google.tt/imgres?imgur...icial%26sa%3DN
post #24 of 70
Congrats angela. Hats off

I have some pics of being born in the caul from a midwifes website. There are a couple so scroll down where it says artificial rupture of membranes.

http://www.homebirth.net.au/search/label/Articles
post #25 of 70
WOW! 8 hours!!?

Were you pushing the WHOLE time, or was it like, PUSH, stop, rest, rest, push, rest, push push, rest rest, kind of thing?

That's crazy. My sister pushed for 6 hours, then went to the hosp and had a c/s. But her baby was trying to come out chin first. And apparently had had seizures in utero, and has cerebral palsy. O.o

Congrats on a healthy baby! (What were his Apgars? morbid curiosity, here).
post #26 of 70
It's sounds like an amazing birth Congratulations. I hope that everyone is settling in well with the new addition.
post #27 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calidris View Post
That's amazing.

I think if I had a baby born in the caul I would name him Paul. Paul was born in the caul.
post #28 of 70
CONGRATULATIONS!!!

Some good reading about babies born in the caul:

In medieval times the appearance of a caul on a newborn baby was seen as a sign of good luck. It was considered an omen that the child was destined for greatness. Gathering the caul onto paper was considered an important tradition of childbirth: the midwife would rub a sheet of paper across the baby's head and face, pressing the material of the caul onto the paper. The caul would then be presented to the mother, to be kept as an heirloom. Other medieval European traditions linked being born with the caul to the ability to defend fertility and the harvest against the forces of evil, particularly witches and sorcerers.

Over the course of European history, a popular legend developed suggesting that possession of a baby's caul would give its bearer good luck and protect that person from death by drowning. Cauls were therefore highly prized by sailors. Medieval women often sold these cauls to sailors for large sums of money; a caul was regarded as a valuable talisman.


So can I buy yours?
post #29 of 70
Congratulations!!

( maybe the long cords are your uterus's way of telling you you need to hang clothes out in the sun more often?)
post #30 of 70
The caul pictures are so cool! Someone in my DDC had a baby born in the caul, and it gave me amniotic sac envy.
post #31 of 70
That's neat he was born in the caul...did your MW's have any interesting tales as to the meaning of being born in the caul?

I've heard:

you'll never drown
you'll have a nurturing type profession
post #32 of 70
AWESOME!!! Congrats Alegna, you did an incredible job!!!
post #33 of 70
You truly are an inspiration!

And I'm so jealous of your child being born in the caul. I was hoping to experience it, but my boy had other ideas - my water broke 9 hours before labor even started.
post #34 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by starry_mama View Post
Ah, ok that makes sense. But maybe you should be careful about congratulating someone for something that was basically luck. plenty of people have their water break during labor or before, even when they take very good care of themselves.
oh i didn't mean it like that. no offense to anyone!
post #35 of 70
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starry_mama View Post
OK, stupid question - whats in the caul? I thought it meant that the baby is completely in the sac still? But if your dd was born partially in the caul, my definition makes no sense?
Dd's was broken, but still all over her. This one wasn't broken.

-Angela
post #36 of 70
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saimeiyu View Post
WOW! 8 hours!!?

Were you pushing the WHOLE time, or was it like, PUSH, stop, rest, rest, push, rest, push push, rest rest, kind of thing?

That's crazy. My sister pushed for 6 hours, then went to the hosp and had a c/s. But her baby was trying to come out chin first. And apparently had had seizures in utero, and has cerebral palsy. O.o

Congrats on a healthy baby! (What were his Apgars? morbid curiosity, here).
Only pushing with contractions which were spaced at least 5 minutes for much of it.

Don't know his apgars. meant to ask MW but forgot. Will ask. They weren't outstanding at least at first- he took a minute to pink up, but then was fine.

-Angela
post #37 of 70
You are truly an inspiration!



With my first, I pushed for 3.75 hours and I remember someone telling me they thought that it was barbaric that the doctor had me push that long. Her and I differ on our definition of barbaric!
post #38 of 70
Alegna you're my shero
post #39 of 70
Congratulations!

Apgars are only supposed to be taken at 1 and 5 minutes anyway - it's nice to give the wee ones a minute to adjust.
post #40 of 70
So did the placenta come out with him, immediately? It's all in the caul together, right?

Congratulations! I am glad thing went well for you both.
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