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Kung Fu Panda and the like - Page 2

post #21 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by warriorprincess View Post
What was wrong with Speed Racer? I haven't seen it but DH took the 5 year old and said it was pretty innoucuous.

ha ha, see what i mean?!!? something inappropriate to me is harmless to another parent. it's all just a matter of opinion and preference. speed racer had some language, and a scene where they were smacking this guy repeatedly across the face (and he was bleeding). it was too much for my kids, as they have never seen someone being hurt like that in a movie. then there was a fish tank filled with pirranahs and they were threatening to put the man in there.....again, too much for my kiddos. then the fish tank got a crack and another dude had to stick his finger in the hole to stop the water from leaking....and the pirranahs ate his finger and it showed blood in the water. ha ha - so yea...we left. but that's how it works with my kiddos. it was too much for them - and i guess that's why the movie was pg. i should have researched it more before going.


but i understand my kids are different than other kids.
post #22 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
My kids are not going to become Kung Fu pandas if they see it...or whatever else the worries are.
uumom - you made me laugh outloud. i so needed that right now!!
post #23 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by blessed View Post
What's wrong about being conditioned to some violence? Any farm or patch of woods anywhere in the world has more violence on a daily basis than the worst kid's movie out there. Does it serve a pariticular purpose for your kids to be so sheltered from real life?

Not that I've thought it through and decided that open exposure is better. But if I'm going to go dramatically out of my way to keep my kids from knowing about or feeling the reality outside the safety of our neighborhood block, then I guess I'd want to have a pretty compelling reason. What is it that you feel is the gain of this approach?
This is a cartoon we're talking about. So likening it to giving a dose of "reality" is kind of a stretch.

I watched The Blob one day when I was little, and started to sit on the edge of the toilet seat because I was afraid that the Blob would come up and eat me. No matter how much I "knew" that the Blob wasn't real, I still feared it coming up through the toilet or coming up through the tub drain when I was taking a bath, and I experienced a lot of fear that imo, was not appropriate or healthy, and it was entirely avoidable.

By the way thirty years later, I STILL perch myself on the very edge of the toilet seat whenever I go to the bathroom because it has become habit. DH makes fun of me about it all the time, but he also has realized that TV/movie imagery and violence can be very disturbing to children and can have lasting ramifications. We are both HUGE Star Wars/Harry Potter/LOTR fans, but we are 100% on the same page that in our house, these aren't considered children's movies. We feel the same way about most popular cartoons as well, quite frankly. We enjoy them as adults, but are planning to wait quite a while before little one partakes.
post #24 of 101
I'm pretty selective about what my son sees (I posted a thread not too long ago about why I hate PBS's Arthur.) BUT we were really excited to take our son to see Kung Fu Panda. (My husband still practices martial arts twice a week, even as an adult. So needless to say, it's BIG in our house.) And I guess we were one of the few who loved the film. I don't go to childrens movies expecting a really deep story line, and of course I can find something objectionable in any movie we watch together, but for the most part we found it really entertaining.

I agree with most posters, though. It really is what you feel your child can handle. My son totally gets that cartoons are imaginary, but not so much for movies with 'live' actors - some of those visuals can really scare him, so we avoid anything even sightly frightening with real people in it.
post #25 of 101
It's not the violence that makes me dislike this genre. They (the ones I've seen) just strike me as tacky, vulgar, lowest-common-demoninator pandering. Plus the art, or whatever you call the look of the cartoon (not up on my movie terms) is so...garish, ugly, just wretched.

Now, there are cartoons I like. Someone here recommended Kiki's Delivery Service, and that seemed like real art. There's the Pink Panther, which my kids love, which is so witty and clever. But Cars, Toy Story, Shrek, etc., no thanks.
post #26 of 101
We won't see Kung fu Panda as long as we have to pay for it, but that's in objection to an actress in it, not the content.

I bring my 2 and 5.5 year olds to all kinds of movies, and they watch what we watch at home, too. They understand that what they are seeing isn't real, and they don't get upset or scared by movies. I don't really think becoming desensitized to fictional violence is a problem -- just means you can enjoy a bigger variety of movies than someone who is very sensitive to those things. Neither one of my children are desensitized to real violence and suffering, and neither am I (my viewing wasn't censored as a child, either).

I feel very positive about the choices we've made for our family, and with the way we handle subjects that come up as a result of the media we have in our lives.
post #27 of 101
I didn't see it, but dh took our 7 yo dd. I read the op to him, and his response was "It's Kung Fu Panda. Of course there was violence. It's a martial arts movie." lol
post #28 of 101
My ds is almost 6 and pretty sensitive. I generally screen movies very carefully.
He has not seen Star Wars or the like yet. Some friends invited us to go to KFP with them so we went. Ds loved it. I thought it was a bit much, overstimulating mostly, but ds really liked it.
post #29 of 101
If I can't watch a kids' movie before I take our family to see it, I look it up on kids-in-mind.com and read the detailed analysis and rating. When I read the one about Kung Fu Panda I decided it was a definite no-go for my kids. I later saw a preview with a few images of the bad guy in it, and I'm glad my kids didn't see it...they would have been terrified. I agree with the PPs that said Kung Fu Panda (and other movies similar to that) are geared more towards adults than children.

Although, a lot of kid movies and shows have adult jokes in them...I remember babysitting my little sister while she was watching The Rugrats. Chuckie said, "There once was a man from Nantucket..." and then got cut off before he could finish the limmerick. I had to bite my tongue HARD.

We took them to see Horton Hears a Who at the $2 theater instead, and while there were still a couple iffy things in it (like a scary vulture and name-calling) the movie as a whole was much more suitable for kids. I'm proud of my kids when they say, "He shouldn't say 'stupid,' it's not a nice word." I use little things like that as learning experiences..."What could he have said instead?" etc.
post #30 of 101
Im less concerned with the violence and inappropriate language than I am about films like KFP snarling them into the big corporate marketing trap. I saw toys, clothes, even breakfast cereal, out in the stores BEFORE Kung fu Panda was even out in theaters! I hate that stuff, and thats what I want to shield my kids from. Just my .02
post #31 of 101
My dd is 8 and I know her. We pick and choose what she will see pretty carefully actually. I read reviews and watch trailers. We discuss what we see. Our standards might seem different than yours but that doesn't mean our child is being made numb or has a darker world view than children who don't see movies.

We saw Kung Fu Panda and liked it. I don't understand why people are acting so surprised by the fighting. It's in the title. It's in the trailers.
We also let dd watch the first Indiana Jones movie on dvd recently. She enjoyed it. It had some pretty dark elements in it but we talked about it and she wasn't bothered.
I also read her The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

In terms of culture/society voluntarily subjecting children to dark or violent movies I think it is naive to think kids aren't exposed to violence or would not know the darker side of life without seeing a movie.
Children in many cultures historically and present day see the darker side of life first hand every day.

Entertainment for children has often contained these darker elements.
Consider fairy tales or nursery rhymes- there is almost always a dark or violent element to them. This isn't new with children's movies.

IMO, Parents should know what their child can handle and limit exposure as they see fit. That doesn't give you the right to judge other parents for making a different decision though.
post #32 of 101
We haven't seen KFP, but we probably will when it comes out on dvd. My husband and I screen most things the kids watch. We don't have a problem with most kids movies, including Star Wars and Indiana Jones. We have taught them from the beginning about acting and pretending and things that are and aren't appropriate. We feel comfortable with their maturity in watching it.

I will admit though the adult undertones and jokes that are now put into kids movies are upsetting and will change our mind between letting the kids watch them and not watch them.

This whole subject is as individual to the families and children as any other decision.
post #33 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Poot View Post
Im less concerned with the violence and inappropriate language than I am about films like KFP snarling them into the big corporate marketing trap. I saw toys, clothes, even breakfast cereal, out in the stores BEFORE Kung fu Panda was even out in theaters! I hate that stuff, and thats what I want to shield my kids from. Just my .02
I agree with a lot of this post. But I generally let my kid see the "kid movies", and then take a stand on the marketed crap. Dd has heard my thoughts on this kind of marketing many, many times!
post #34 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnmama View Post
I agree with a lot of this post. But I generally let my kid see the "kid movies", and then take a stand on the marketed crap. Dd has heard my thoughts on this kind of marketing many, many times!
Maybe my kids are different but I find that they don't care about the marketing crap. My kids have never been interested in toys, etc, associated with movies.
So I tend not to really worry about it too much. If my kids became obsessed, I'd feel differently.

ETA: Sunmama, I do feel the same way you do, I didn't mean to sound like I was dismissing your feelings. I just don't get as bothered about it as I do other things because it's not a big issue for me personally.
post #35 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlyzombiecat View Post
IMO, Parents should know what their child can handle and limit exposure as they see fit. That doesn't give you the right to judge other parents for making a different decision though.
My feelings exactly. I don't know if I actually mentioned this but my 6 yo did see the movie with me. He was fine with it, I would have preferred to see something else but it was his choice.
post #36 of 101
Meh, there was more violence in Tom and Jerry and RoadRunner than in any other cartoons I've ever seen since I was a kid. I seemed to have turned out ok :P
post #37 of 101
Maybe I am missing something, but Kung Fu Panda is rated PG so why would people think it to be free of all violent images or language might be offensive. PG does mean Parental Guidance suggested as all material may not be suitable for children. That allows each parent to decide what is and isn't appropriate for their child. Why criticize the movie maker when they are just creating different movie going options. Children vary so much and it is the parent's duty to know their own child. The only time I am willing to judge another parents decision is if the child is clearly unhappy in a movie (scared, asking to leave, crying, or other) and the parent is unwilling to leave because they paid good money to see this so by god they will see it out.

Last summer my 4yo loved the movie "Matilda" on DVD based on the Roald Dahl book of the same title. He was not at all frightened of Ms. Trunchbull even though she is a very nasty character. He saw her as an exaggeration for the purposes of the movie. So when he begged to show the DVD to his cousins who were 8 months older I thought nothing of it. They were terrified! I felt horrible when I found out afterward that they had both been shaking like leaves on their parents' laps, but I was really most shocked by the fact that my brother and SIL didn't say a word while we were watching, didn't have me fast forward past the Trunchbull parts.

I will take my preschooler to G rated movies in a theatre. But if he wants to see a PG rated movie (and most animated movies are), we wait for the DVD. That way we are watching it on a small screen together and we can fast forward past anything that he doesn't like. He has watched Star Wars with his daddy but the nice thing about seeing it on DVD is they were able to stop whenever my son had a question about the story or the characters. It would have too much for him to see it on a big screen with no opportunity for discussion. The discussion part I think is key for younger kids to be able to process the more complex concepts (and some kids aren't even ready for that much while some are ready for more).

I expect that will probably change for us when he is around 8, when I think he will be ready to attend some PG with me.
post #38 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnmama View Post
I agree with a lot of this post. But I generally let my kid see the "kid movies", and then take a stand on the marketed crap. Dd has heard my thoughts on this kind of marketing many, many times!
EXACTLY...
I can address the violence if my little guys find it scary, the marketing is just so insidious. My 2 year old can point out characters from shows he doesn't even watch. He doesn't like sesame street, leaves the room if it comes on, but he can always point out elmo. Billions of dollars spent on research to manipulate children and turn them into consumers, it's just sick.
post #39 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlyzombiecat View Post



In terms of culture/society voluntarily subjecting children to dark or violent movies I think it is naive to think kids aren't exposed to violence or would not know the darker side of life without seeing a movie.
Children in many cultures historically and present day see the darker side of life first hand every day.

Entertainment for children has often contained these darker elements.
Consider fairy tales or nursery rhymes- there is almost always a dark or violent element to them. This isn't new with children's movies.
This topic has been discussed many times on MDC but I'll add my two cents. While storybooks and fairytales may contain scary and violent ideas or dark themes, reading does not have the same effect on the brain as images on a tv or movie screen!! There have been countless studies that tell us that watching violence on tv has a physiological and psychologicaleffect on humans and that we become numb to the violence we are seeing.

This does not mean, however, that viewing violence makes one violent. Of course not. But it does have other negative effects. Google it. It's proven.

And as far as "shielding children from the real world" - I just have to say If my "real" world was a world of murder, shooting, rape, hatred, and non-stop car crashes and violence - why would I need to go to the movies? Yes, I'll shield my children from that world, thank you very much, and go on watching Animal Planet where yes, animals die, and yes, that's nature. Big difference in my book.
post #40 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krystal323 View Post
sorry, but :. i don't want my kids to be blindsided by the big scary society out there past our front door i think if i had continued to "protect" them the way i did at first, they wouldn't know how to cope with the rest of the culture as a teen/young adult.
:

My son is 6 1/2 and I just started him in TaeKwonDo. I think I'm also going to let him see Kung Fu Panda. I think it's time to introduce him to these concepts in a controlled manner. He will be encountering them with his schoolmates regularly and I'd rather it begins on my terms, with my explanations.
There's no avoiding these concepts. Not unless we build a yurt in the woods and never leave. And I think it's unfair to have it thrust on him when he's older and hasn't slowly become accustomed to the ideas. I've spent the first years teaching him what I think of violence, how to problem solve - all the background work. Now it's my job to slowly introduce how everyone else operates, and show him how to deal with that too.
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