or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › The Childhood Years › Kung Fu Panda and the like
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Kung Fu Panda and the like - Page 3

post #41 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessy1019 View Post
We won't see Kung fu Panda as long as we have to pay for it, but that's in objection to an actress in it, not the content.
Just curious ... who is the actress and what is your objection?
post #42 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by hottmama View Post
We watch things like Star Wars, Narnia movies, Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, etc. and my kids really, really love them. They run around with their foam swords and capes yelling, "For Narnia!" My littlest likes to pretend he's Gandalf the White. Luke and Leia and Darth Vader are popular right now.

They aren't violent kids, they understand the difference between real life and fiction, and good vs. evil is a very important theme to little guys. I LOVED the Narnia and LOTR books when I was in elementary school and I'm so glad I can share the movies with my kids.

I haven't seen Kung Fu Panda yet but I was planning to watch it with my kids.
Another : here. My son was into Indiana Jones, Star Wars, LOTR, etc. from a very young age and he's not a 'violent' kid. We let him watch pretty much what he wants now (he's 12 1/2) although we tend to watch everything with him and have *occasionally* turned off something that we aren't comfortable with.

I know that some kids are very sensitive to some of the stuff that happens in these and other movies like Shrek, KFP, etc., but it's up to the parents to make their own judgment call for their own families. My dd1 is less interested in the same movies that my son liked at the same age, and is less tolerant of some of the action, etc. that happens in them.

I don't think it's fair to say that parents are not exercising good judgement (from the OP) because other families make different decisions.
post #43 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Auntie Sapphire View Post
Just curious ... who is the actress and what is your objection?
Angelina Jolie . . . she is an adopter and promoter of adoption, and I am against adoption.
post #44 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessy1019 View Post
Angelina Jolie . . . she is an adopter and promoter of adoption, and I am against adoption.
And the alternative for children she's adopted from orphanages would be???? In this reality, their reality, not some idealized world. FTR, I was adopted and would be curious to hear your objections.
post #45 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by zinemama View Post
It's not the violence that makes me dislike this genre. They (the ones I've seen) just strike me as tacky, vulgar, lowest-common-demoninator pandering. Plus the art, or whatever you call the look of the cartoon (not up on my movie terms) is so...garish, ugly, just wretched.

Now, there are cartoons I like. Someone here recommended Kiki's Delivery Service, and that seemed like real art. There's the Pink Panther, which my kids love, which is so witty and clever. But Cars, Toy Story, Shrek, etc., no thanks.
I agree. I will never see Shrek ( talk about tacky and low brow) or those ugly Pixar movies. (Except my kids are begging to see Wall-E- I don't know. They are also begging to see Hollywood Chiuahaha, which I told them they could see if they could find a trusted adult who is not ME to take them. I'll even pay.)
post #46 of 101
It's a continuing discussion in our house about what DS can and can't watch. Not from him, but between DH and I. We've made mistakes before but the mistakes have given us a better idea of what's appropriate for him. We're also somewhat MDC outliers, or it feels that way, since Disney and Pixar movies are popular in our house. (My MIL buys DS a few every time she's in town.)

None of those have given him any problems (although we do skip the start of Finding Nemo because it upsets my husband), and he's seen the Star Wars movies and the LOTR movies, as well as some others (Die Hard, for instance, and old James Bonds) plus we have some older traditionally violent cartoon like Tom and Jerry and Looney Toons. We watch them on a little portable DVD player and I turn the screen if it's going to be what I consider an inappropriate scene. But I don't have any issues with fighting or things blowing up. What I do have an issue with is graphic, realistic violence and gore. He won't be watching anything like that for a long time--no horror movies on cable for instance (I'm still scarred!). And we do talk about how movies are made and he makes movies with the movie feature on the digital camera.

He's only seen two movies in the theater, one when he was too little to remember (we went for us, but picked a kids movie just in case), Over the Hedge, and the other a few months ago, Veggietales: the Pirates who Don't Do Anything, which was adorable.
post #47 of 101
Personally I took DS1 to see Kung Fu Panda because I wanted to be with him when he watched a movie like this to be able to talk to him about it. He is exposed to a lot of violent pop-culture at his public school (Junior Kindergarten starts at 4 in Ontario) and I wanted to know what he understood and have a framework for communication with him.

Plus, I wanted to see if he was interested in the martial arts aspect of it because I have always thought that the martial arts might be a good fit for him and wanted to see if he responded. He did, so I will look into finding him a teacher. If I find him a teacher, I will go back to studying myself so that I can teach him about the values I want him to learn from it.

I believe that violence is part of the human experience and I want DS1 to learn how to respect life and the power of violence from me rather than his peer group.
post #48 of 101
I think kids are ready for violent/scary movies at different ages, and it's important for parents to be careful not to expose their kids to more than they can handle, to watch what they watch so they can discuss it, and to make sure the kids know it's okay to leave the theater (or stop the DVD) if they've had enough.

We love "The Simpsons" and watch it regularly. Sometimes there's violence involving the "real" characters, and there are the Halloween specials where really scary things happen to them, and there are the absurdly gory "Itchy & Scratchy" segments. EnviroKid says, "Oh! That is NOT nice!" or "They are cartoon people; real people don't do that." and we agree. Sometimes we talk about what would be a better way to solve the problem.

During "The Simpsons" we often see ads for movies, including KFP, and other shows such as "Family Guy" and "24". We mute the sound during ads. When something terrible is shown, I say, "Ugh! That looks like a TERRIBLE show!" Sometimes (esp. if it's animated) EnviroKid says, "No, I want to see that one!" and I say, "No, there's too much hurting people and laughing about it in that show. I don't like that."

Recently the neighbor kids have invited my kid into their house, and I go along because I'm not comfortable having him there alone. Coincidentally, we've often been there when their grandma is watching one of those "funny home video" shows. My main reaction to it is, "Ouch! That wasn't funny at all!" EnviroKid now talks about "the laughing at bad accidents show" and puzzles over the fact that his friends' grandma agrees with my opinion yet keeps watching the dang show!

Last December, we started to watch The Polar Express on TV because my out-laws had recommended it. After about half an hour, EnviroKid said, "This is a bad show. I don't want to see any more." so we stopped. It was a lot more creepy than I'd expected--both the content and the quality of the animation--and I didn't like the way they attempted to diffuse the tension of the runaway-train scene with pratfalls that were supposed to be funny because the victims were unintelligent and unattractive.

When we channel-surf in hotels, he always wants to see anything that's animated or has fantasy characters like dragons, but if a battle begins, he gets annoyed: "Oh, it's about enemies. What else is on?"

I'm not entirely opposed to the idea of battles as plot elements. I just think there's plenty of time for that sort of thing. Right now, we love to listen to The Nutcracker, the complete ballet on records. I've outlined the story for EnviroKid, and he gets very excited about acting out the various parts: "Here come the mice and toy soldiers fighting with big knives!" is said with the same enthusiasm as, "Here come the dancing cookies!" as he leaps around.

EnviroDaddy and I both are big Star Wars and LOTR fans and look forward to sharing those movies with our child...in time. We figure we'll know when it's the right time, and we're not there yet. It's funny--my parents were fairly careful about what I saw as a young child, yet I vividly remember seeing Star Wars in the theater when I was barely 5 years old and being not at all shocked that people were shooting at each other so much, so I must have been accustomed to seeing shooting by then, and that seems young...and my brother was not yet 3 when we saw it! I do remember my parents telling us on the way in that everthing we were going to see was PRETEND and my mother leaning over during the trash compacter scene to whisper, "Don't worry, they'll get out." It was very exciting, I loved it, and I want to share it with my child pretty soon...but not quite yet!
post #49 of 101
Quote:
And the alternative for children she's adopted from orphanages would be???? In this reality, their reality, not some idealized world. FTR, I was adopted and would be curious to hear your objections.
I'm an adoptive parent and I sure as heck DON'T want to hear the objections.

At least not in this thread.
post #50 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by blessed View Post
What's wrong about being conditioned to some violence? Any farm or patch of woods anywhere in the world has more violence on a daily basis than the worst kid's movie out there. Does it serve a pariticular purpose for your kids to be so sheltered from real life?
You're kidding, right? There's a huge difference between an owl killing a mouse for food and a ninja killing someone (even a 'mouse' character) for show. One is a fact of life in nature, the other is gratuitous violence.

My kids and I watched "The March of the Penguins" and dd sobbed and sobbed when one of the mama penguins got eaten by a sea lion. "What will happen to her baby penguin?" We talked about how it would die because it wouldn't have enough food. And how it was sad. Sometimes animals die because other animals eat them.

But, you know, I haven't had any hand-to-hand combat, kick boxing, swords or other weapons flying around my neighborhood lately, and if I did, I'd call the cops!! So I don't feel bad about sheltering them from this kind of thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blessed View Post
Not that I've thought it through and decided that open exposure is better. But if I'm going to go dramatically out of my way to keep my kids from knowing about or feeling the reality outside the safety of our neighborhood block, then I guess I'd want to have a pretty compelling reason. What is it that you feel is the gain of this approach?
1. Children who don't have nightmares.
2. Children who have a realistic view of violence - hitting people HURTS. You don't get smacked down by someone twice your size and then pop up again as if nothing had happened.
3. Children who are honestly shocked at violence. I don't want to raise children who accept violence as the status quo. I want children who challenge that status quo, who see any form of violence, from bullying to war, as something that is wrong.

I'm not saying my kids will never watch anything with violence, but they're going to be older. Ds is 7, and I'd think about taking him if he asked. I wouldn't ever take our 4 yo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistymama View Post
I was the kid that wasn't allowed to see many movies, and it took me a really long time to stop resenting my parents over that. I so clearly remember being 12, and not allowed to watch Dirty Dancing (which was a HUGE hit) because it was PG-13. It was damaging socially, much more than anything I might have seen in the stupid movie.
Well, I'm a lot more comfortable with my kids seeing sex than I am violence, so I probably would have let you see the movie. I'm sensitive to the social implications too, and if my 12 yo wanted to see a PG 13 movie, I'd probably let them. But not my 8 yo.

So far my kids, who live in a neighborhood with very mainstream kids and go to public school with very mainstream kids, have not asked to see Kung Fu Panda. You don't have to preemptively expose your kids to this stuff to make them 'fit in'. If they ask, then we'll talk.

My kids did watch Alvin & the Chimpunks (also PG) and also stupid, with some mild sassy language, but I was OK with that. i'm much much more concerned with violence.

I watched the trailers and Kung Fu Panda was too scary for my kids. I've got 2 kids who are particularly sensitive, and I know that. Creepy guys rising up and attacking, egads, my kids would run in terror! Heck after the trauma of "March of the Penguins" dd has not asked to see another movie!
post #51 of 101
Oh my word, Funniest Home Videos. What garbage. There's the occasional cute baby doing something funny or cats jumping six feet straight up. But watching real people get truly injured over and over? Why?? What's funny about it?

I have to question how in the world you can object to the martial arts and sword play in a movie called Kung Fu Panda.

It's funny how people can differ even in the same family. Dd has been less sensitive to scary movies and movie violence than I was at her age. Ds is more like I was, a bit more sensitive. So we act accordingly.

And in spite of the fact that dd is less sensitive to fantasy violence and scariness, she is no less sensitive to real life cruelty than I am. She got teary eyed reading in the paper about a three y.o. boy who was severely neglected and was beaten to death.
post #52 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoHiddenFees View Post
And the alternative for children she's adopted from orphanages would be???? In this reality, their reality, not some idealized world. FTR, I was adopted and would be curious to hear your objections.
Please start a new thread to do this!
post #53 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by moonshoes View Post
This topic has been discussed many times on MDC but I'll add my two cents. While storybooks and fairytales may contain scary and violent ideas or dark themes, reading does not have the same effect on the brain as images on a tv or movie screen!! There have been countless studies that tell us that watching violence on tv has a physiological and psychologicaleffect on humans and that we become numb to the violence we are seeing.

This does not mean, however, that viewing violence makes one violent. Of course not. But it does have other negative effects. Google it. It's proven.

And as far as "shielding children from the real world" - I just have to say If my "real" world was a world of murder, shooting, rape, hatred, and non-stop car crashes and violence - why would I need to go to the movies? Yes, I'll shield my children from that world, thank you very much, and go on watching Animal Planet where yes, animals die, and yes, that's nature. Big difference in my book.

:

Thank you!
post #54 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoHiddenFees View Post
And the alternative for children she's adopted from orphanages would be???? In this reality, their reality, not some idealized world. FTR, I was adopted and would be curious to hear your objections.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
Please start a new thread to do this!
Good idea.

I just started one here in Parenting.
post #55 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
I watched the trailers and Kung Fu Panda was too scary for my kids. I've got 2 kids who are particularly sensitive, and I know that. Creepy guys rising up and attacking, egads, my kids would run in terror! Heck after the trauma of "March of the Penguins" dd has not asked to see another movie!
And this a good thing ? On the other hand, dd and I saw Kung Fu Panda, laughed, went out for ice cream on the way home, and snuggled into bed at the end of a happy evening together.

Why is it that being terrified of imaginary characters is a good trait?

I honestly don't buy that your children are more sensitive to actual violence than my child. I do think that my child is probably more discerning. She has no trouble differentiating between high kicking cartoon animals and real life.

There are some themes which would frighten or unsettle my child, even in animation. But pretend animals engaged in pretend fighting is a long way from being one of them.
post #56 of 101
I find it interesting that most of the people who have negative things to say about the movie, are the ones who haven't actually seen it.
post #57 of 101
I haven't seen the movie. My dh took my older kids (8 & 5) when it was about 105 degrees one day. They liked it. They want to try karate. It was very cold in the movie (we don't have air) really....that was about how much feedback I got.

LynnS6 - my kids were also terrified of March of the Penguins...it wasn't a cartoon and it was out a few years ago...also a very realistic and sad story.

Also, LynnS6 I just have to ask have your children really never had nightmares? Because despite seeing movies my children's nightmares are reality based...me dying of cancer (one of their best friends mom's did), them drowning (a child in our church did), getting hit by a car (a child did on our street);
You also mentioned having children who have a realistic view of violence - "hitting people HURTS". "You don't get smacked down by someone twice your size and then pop up again as if nothing had happened". Don't your kids know not to hurt eadch other? Mine certainly do despite having seen cartoons where cartoon characters fight each other....They are both gentle with their 1 year old brother and about as gentle with each other as can be expected since before movies were invented...
post #58 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by blessed View Post
And this a good thing ? On the other hand, dd and I saw Kung Fu Panda, laughed, went out for ice cream on the way home, and snuggled into bed at the end of a happy evening together.
I'm glad it didn't bother her; I know it would have bothered my daughter (who is, after all only 4).

Quote:
Originally Posted by blessed View Post
Why is it that being terrified of imaginary characters is a good trait?
it's neither good nor bad. Nor, did I say that it was "better", I said "more sensitive". Trust me, there are many days when I wish my kids were NOT so afraid of things their imaginations have cooked up. But knowing my kids, I know they are not ready for Kung Fu Panda.

Quote:
Originally Posted by blessed View Post
I honestly don't buy that your children are more sensitive to actual violence than my child. I do think that my child is probably more discerning. She has no trouble differentiating between high kicking cartoon animals and real life.
I didn't say that my children were more sensitive to actual violence. I just do not want to expose my children to graphic violence (even of the cartoon type) because I strongly believe, based on good research, that violent, moving images are not good for them. And I see no reason to desensitize them to any kind of violence.

My kids can differentiate between high kicking cartoon animals and real life too. The kicking wouldn't actually bother them that much, it's the scary figures (the cobra rising out of something) and the thought that people are out to hurt you that would bother dd a lot. Ds might be old enough to get the whole story. And if you read my post, I said that if he wanted to see it, we'd talk about it. I'd probably show him the trailer and see what he thought.
post #59 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildmonkeys View Post
...my kids were also terrified of March of the Penguins...it wasn't a cartoon and it was out a few years ago...also a very realistic and sad story....
Yes, I don't know anyone - adult or child - who didn't cry and perseverate over March of the Penguins. Actually, I haven't let dd watch it yet for that reason (she's 4 yo too). I know the baby abandonment themes would be hard for her to handle right now.

ETA: I guess that's in line with what many of us are saying. Real life is tremendously more violent and traumatic than kid's movies - which tend to be watered down, marginalized versions of some theme. If your kids are so sheltered that pretend wrestling scenes terrify them, I'm just not sure what service that does them.
post #60 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessy1019 View Post
Angelina Jolie . . . she is an adopter and promoter of adoption, and I am against adoption.
Many of us on MDC are "adopters" and "promoters of adoption".

Why don't you boycott us?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Childhood Years
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Childhood and Beyond › The Childhood Years › Kung Fu Panda and the like