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Posterior Baby??

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I know that he is in a head down position and for the past couple of weeks has been Right anterior but I think over the last 2 days he has turned posterior. I had horrible back labor with DS#2 due to posterior and was thinking I was doing everything to keep this one anterior. I have looked at the spinning babies site and the Inversion technique - though I tried that yesterday because I felt like he was acynclitic and was trying to get a more straight on position, and think that's when he turned to the back.

Does anyone have any other ideas to try to get him turned back around??
post #2 of 14
I heard your should scrub the floor on all fours every day. Hands and knees can help the baby turn. Tell baby to turn. Visualize the baby turning.
post #3 of 14
My midwife had me lay on top of a huge bean bag with my belly down for hours every day. It felt so good to be able to lay on my front side again.
post #4 of 14
I know that both moxibustion (done by an acupuncturist though not technically acupuncture) and chiropractic adjustments have successfully turned breech babies. You might call some pro's in your area who are knowledgeable about prenatal practice and see if they can do the same for a posterior baby. When/if I'm pregnant again, I'm going to try both pre-emptively. My own posterior labor sucked so I feel for you, mama!
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by ferra View Post
I heard your should scrub the floor on all fours every day. Hands and knees can help the baby turn. Tell baby to turn. Visualize the baby turning.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sacredmama View Post
My midwife had me lay on top of a huge bean bag with my belly down for hours every day. It felt so good to be able to lay on my front side again.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post
I know that both moxibustion (done by an acupuncturist though not technically acupuncture) and chiropractic adjustments have successfully turned breech babies. You might call some pro's in your area who are knowledgeable about prenatal practice and see if they can do the same for a posterior baby. When/if I'm pregnant again, I'm going to try both pre-emptively. My own posterior labor sucked so I feel for you, mama!
I have to second the ideas for being on hands and kneeds, acupuncture, and chiropractic...I know women for whom these things did work.

I feel for you...I also had a posterior labor and it sucked...big time. It was a total nightmare.

There are a ton of websites though that describe inversion techniques. Good luck! I hope it works out!
post #6 of 14
Long, painful posterior labors are probably one of the biggest reasons the caesarean section rate has increased so dramatically over the past forty years.

Posterior labor = FTP.
post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
Long, painful posterior labors are probably one of the biggest reasons the caesarean section rate has increased so dramatically over the past forty years.
I wonder if there has been an increase in long, posterior labors and a cause for that?
post #8 of 14
There was a thread on here long ago about old cushions on old sofas that and the pregnant women who lay on them in the later months, watching television.

Chiropractics, sitting and laying on a harder surface helps, I have heard, as well as the hand and knees position, scrubbing floors, etc.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
There was a thread on here long ago about old cushions on old sofas that and the pregnant women who lay on them in the later months, watching television.

Chiropractics, sitting and laying on a harder surface helps, I have heard, as well as the hand and knees position, scrubbing floors, etc.
Fascinating! I'll have to look for that thread. I really wonder about this because I had a terrible birth experience which was drawn out and long with a posterior baby who ended up coming out via c-section despite an intense wish from me to avoid a section, and also using a midwife and doula.

I exercised regularly throughout the pregnancy, though, and I don't watch a lot of tv. I know there has to be a reason that it happened, though. And I would like to identify the point at which I could possible have turned things around in order to avoid a c-section.
post #10 of 14
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post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post

Chiropractics, sitting and laying on a harder surface helps, I have heard, as well as the hand and knees position, scrubbing floors, etc.
With regard to inversion and chiropractics (and I'm going to read more on this and research it) but what did the chiropractor do for you for those that had this?

What is the chiropractic technique that turns a baby? Does it always work?

Before going into labor, I had read in the natural child birth literature that this could be done to turn a malpositioned baby to prepare for labor, but my midwife never noticed that my baby was not positioned correctly until late in the delivery process...it was near the time that I began pushing.

Is this typical? I feel a little let down that the midwife didn't notice until then. We did try pushing in different positions that she thought might help turn the baby, but it didn't work.

I remember thinking the baby was positioned wrong early in the labor process because of many factors, chief among them the level of early pain, the location of the pain, the quickness between contractions when I was low dilation.

When did your midwife or OB know your baby was incorrectly positioned? Or tell you that?
post #12 of 14
I'm another recommending a chiropractor. I 100% believe that the adjustments helped me so much with my second birth. I had horrible sciatic nerve pain that he was able to mostly alleviate as well as straightening my back out which I feel allowed my baby the best positioning.

When I went in initially I was about 35 weeks pregnant and my back was out of alignment making one leg actually about a half inch shorter than the other and my hips hurt so bad I could barely walk some days. Now, as far as the back labor that is just a feeling, I don't know for 100% fact that it's why I had back labor with baby #1 and not baby #2 but I feel strongly that it had a lot to do with it.

Baby #1 was over 26 hours back labor and ended up with a lot of interventions, almost a c-sec.

Baby #2 was 2.5 hours start to finish and just awesome and not really too painful.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikayla's mama View Post
I'm another recommending a chiropractor. I 100% believe that the adjustments helped me so much with my second birth. I had horrible sciatic nerve pain that he was able to mostly alleviate as well as straightening my back out which I feel allowed my baby the best positioning.

When I went in initially I was about 35 weeks pregnant and my back was out of alignment making one leg actually about a half inch shorter than the other and my hips hurt so bad I could barely walk some days. Now, as far as the back labor that is just a feeling, I don't know for 100% fact that it's why I had back labor with baby #1 and not baby #2 but I feel strongly that it had a lot to do with it.

Baby #1 was over 26 hours back labor and ended up with a lot of interventions, almost a c-sec.

Baby #2 was 2.5 hours start to finish and just awesome and not really too painful.

I had a babe who in utero liked to hang out on my sciatic nerve, causing a lot of pain and problems. I had a feeling then that there could be a connection to that and the fact that the baby never fully positioned correctly and didn't descend down the birth canal the right way, causing terrible, terrible back labor, strong contractions with little dilation, and ultimately was stuck and delivered via c-section.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice View Post
There was a thread on here long ago about old cushions on old sofas that and the pregnant women who lay on them in the later months, watching television.
Absolutely avoid any sort of reclining position. Keep knees lower than hips, belly slung forward/downward.

I found tailor sitting or sitting in hero pose on a yoga bolster to work well in late pregnancy. DS1 was OP and I think I did a lot of reclining with him. DS2 was supposedly posterior (wasn't going into labor, not sure I believe he was) and I wasn't as good about being mindful about sitting positions. With DS3 I was VERY mindful of it, and he was OA.
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