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Muslim Girl suspended for hijab - Page 2

post #21 of 39
Can someone clarify for those of us less informed... by definition is a hijab simply a head covering but not a face covering? Does a veil that also covers the face have a different name?

I headed off a tangent on this topic at another board about how distracting it would be for the teacher if she couldn't see the students face by refering the dolt to the picture that accomponied the article that he himself had posted!
post #22 of 39
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post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally posted by MirandaW
I wish my own supposedly tolerant country actually crossed the bridge into acceptance.


Seems like a good as place as any to add this news into the mix:
France Backs School Ban on Islamic Veils
http://news.findlaw.com/ap_stories/i...003005_13.html
post #24 of 39
Quote:
Administrators at the girls' high school, in Aubervilliers outside Paris, said the headscarves were ostentatious symbols of religion.
I wonder if they ban necklaces or other Christian symbols at their puplic schools in France???? Anyone know????

And, I don't think the head covering is a religious symbol. I see it more as a way of life for muslim women. When it goes against your religion to expose a part of your body in public, that is much more than a symbol. I see it as an ancient custom that has been carried on for generations.

Thanks for the link, R.D.!
post #25 of 39
More on how many of our friends on the other side of the pond are getting their knickers in a twist over the headscarf worn by teachers. kids etc.:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/3135600.stm
post #26 of 39
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post #27 of 39
Oh mahdohkt you just don't get it. Feminism is the freedom to dress like a $6 whore.. not freedom to dress modestly! Back to womens studies class for you!
[/sarcasm]

I have nothing against the French in general, but in this matter they are obviously more interested in "freedom FROM" over "Freedom TO". I don't care for that way of thinking.
post #28 of 39
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post #29 of 39
mahdokht


Quote:
BTW I think "HOOTERS" is much more symbolic of women's oppression than a headscarf.
post #30 of 39
As Salaam Alaikum,

Sister mahdohkt, very good posts. i know that i am coming in on this a little to late!

There are so many misunderstandings about the dress of muslim women. Thanks for breaking it down for people to understand!

Khoda Hafez
post #31 of 39
Wearing a religious symbol around your neck is different than hiding your face in the name of religion. When I have lived in other country's I have always followed thier rules. Why is this different? If you live in america, follow the rules. How is this so hard for them? I followed the rules of other country's I respected what they did. It comes down to them saying scr%% you I will do as I wish!!!!
post #32 of 39
Welcome to America, now speak English dammit!

How is a crucifix different than a yamulka, different than a head scarf?

Sorry, you lost me.
post #33 of 39
"Wearing a religious symbol around your neck is different than hiding your face in the name of religion. When I have lived in other country's I have always followed thier rules. Why is this different? If you live in america, follow the rules. How is this so hard for them? I followed the rules of other country's I respected what they did. It comes down to them saying scr%% you I will do as I wish!!!!"

wow, this post frustrates me so profoundly that i just want to make sure you're not joking...
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by alaskan mom
If you live in america, follow the rules. How is this so hard for them?
Sorry, I must have missed the "no head scarf" amendment to our constitution. What "rules" are you referring to? This was a local school policy, which I frankly find fascist and un-American.
post #35 of 39
Hijab is not a religous symbol, it's a religious obligation. Big difference.
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Potty Diva
Gee, another toughy.

If the public school doesn't allow Christian prayer, then it should not allow anything religion, including hijab. But if other children can come to school with symbols of their religion, then hijab should be allowed.



Slightly OT~

Does an adults hijab cover the face?
I think there's a difference between prayer and clothing. e.g., Jewish yamulke or Christian crucifix versus reciting Torah or the Lord's Prayer. Clothing is one's free speech to express one's religious faith; rather than an imposition of that religion on others (which is what classroom prayer would be).

And in New York, yes children have been disciplined for wearing Christian symbols to school. But subway workers have also been threatened with firing by the city for wearing Indian Sikh turbans. It's "scaring" New Yorkers because it reminds them of Osama Bin Laden.
:

In both cases the censorship is wrong.

RE: Mahdokht's post about DMV and hijabs: I had a college friend who went through the same thing at DMV, with being asked to take her hijab off. They claimed it was to distinguish her from everyone else. : She was very religious, and to her it was the equivalent of being asked to take her clothes off for the picture. I can't believe how disrespectful DMV was by asking her to do that! :
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by MirandaW
Heather,

I remember that case but I didn't know she ended up killing herself. How sad.

Now onto hijab. Honestly, sometimes when I come here I feel like I have so much more work to do in order to become accepting of all people based on the content of their character and not the color of their skin or covering on their head or form of worship, etc.

Hijab used to really offend me, it was like "they" were rubbing it into "our" face that they weren't one of "us". Then I actually explored life beyond my narrow preconceptions and learned that white middle class sensibilities weren't the only ones, and that just because a woman wears a hijab and maybe no makeup, doesn't mean she isn't just as American as I am.

I don't even blink when I see hijab now and several mamas I know and have befriended do. Although I still find it jarring on teen girls, but that is my own prejudice and has nothing to do with them.

Anyway, I just watched the movie "Bend it Like Beckham" and it was so neat that the father character, who was Sikh, was given a special British Airways turban to wear to work. I wish my own supposedly tolerant country actually crossed the bridge into acceptance.

I actually used to think the same way, until I read some stuff about how the hijab actually CAN be a "feminist" symbol. What it says is that a Muslim woman is proud of who she is and what she believes in, and also has respect for her body and sexuality. As the article said, it doesn't tell men "Abuse me," it tells them, "I'm here at university (or work) to learn/do my work and to witness my values, not to meet boyfriends. Leave me alone."

I thought it was very interesting, and it gave me a new level of respect for the practice.
post #38 of 39
This has been interesting to read. Religious tolerance is a good thing. Unity in diversity, freedom to be who you are etc. as long as you are not infringing the rights of others.

Can't see how a scarf (hjab) is going to hurt the eyes of any christians, secularists, humanists, jews, rednecks etc.
post #39 of 39
It was said in a post above, that there are different interpretations about the age a girl begins to wear the hijab/scarf etc. A Muslim told me that girls begin wearing it at menstruation.

I've also been told that to force a Muslim female to take off the head scarf, to some females, feels as much a violation to her dignity as if I were forced to walk through an airport topless.

In my town, no hats are allowed at school unless they are for religious purposes. Other religious objects are not mentioned in the dress code.
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