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Holy cow. If I have to buy all these supplies, why aren't I just homeschooling? - Page 6

post #101 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeca View Post
I don't mind helping out with school supplies or snacks but when you are asking for a TON of stuff at once is a bit much. I would rather get a note saying we need such and such a few times through the year. I always respond better to those.
I found (as a teacher) that it was MUCH easier to get supplies from parents at the beginning than in the middle of the year. At the beginning it would take a week- max- before everyone had the stuff. In the middle lots of kids would never do it.

AND around here everything is MUCH cheaper at the beginning of the year.

-Angela
post #102 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
I found (as a teacher) that it was MUCH easier to get supplies from parents at the beginning than in the middle of the year. At the beginning it would take a week- max- before everyone had the stuff. In the middle lots of kids would never do it.

AND around here everything is MUCH cheaper at the beginning of the year.

-Angela
I know you always have some parents that don't send things when asked. I have three in school and all those supplies all at once plus new shoes, bookbags, lunch money is a big OUCH.
post #103 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
I found (as a teacher) that it was MUCH easier to get supplies from parents at the beginning than in the middle of the year. At the beginning it would take a week- max- before everyone had the stuff. In the middle lots of kids would never do it.

AND around here everything is MUCH cheaper at the beginning of the year.

-Angela
I would have to agree with this. My DD's kindy teacher said that she felt bad when she had to ask for supplies at all from parents so she tried to make one big request at the start of the year. Every parent was asked to send in one pair of scissors for the classroom as a part of the list - after everyone had brought in supplies she ended up with only 24 pairs with 52 kids bringing stuff in, not even enough for her morning class to each have a pair to use during cutting activities. She also said that she ended up pretty much replacing all of the sets each year since they do so much cutting of construction/copy paper that the blades are pretty dull at the end of the year and it is hard for new cutters (at the start of the year) to use dull scissors. I tried to donate as much as I could to the classroom (she was told at the end of the year that she was moving up to 3rd grade and had to provide a classroom library for her students - lucky for her my sister had given me her classroom library when she left teaching to be a mom and I was able to donate the 900 books that she had given me for my girls and to share with anyone who needed them. She told us that we had made her day since she was stressing as to how she was going to pay for an adequate library even if she bought all of the books at Goodwill for $.59 each).

Honestly, I doubt that the vast majority of these teachers would ask for supplies from parents it they weren't desperately needed.
post #104 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeca View Post
I know you always have some parents that don't send things when asked. I have three in school and all those supplies all at once plus new shoes, bookbags, lunch money is a big OUCH.


I hear you.

Though at least *supplies* are so much cheaper here at the beginning of the year. EASILY half the price otherwise. Often a third or fourth of the regular price.

-Angela
post #105 of 157
I hear what you are saying, at the same time, it wouldn't bother me that much. I'd rather have a happy teacher who has supplies and a well stocked classroom so he/she can focus on teaching and not worry about needing stuff or running out.
post #106 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heavenly View Post
Trust me, homeschooling costs ALOT more than that. I don't view that list as excessive at all.
Yes, homeschooling costs a lot more.
post #107 of 157
I haven't read any replies, so forgive me if I am repeating anyone.

I do not think your list is unreasonable. Our list last year (twins entering Kinder) was longer and cost me a whopping $30 per child. I bought for my two plus one extra set of everything to donate, all for less than $100. If you honestly think $30 per child is going to get you very far with homeschool curriculum materials...well, it's just not even in the same ball park.

This year, I have one entering Kinder and two entering 1st grade. Their lists are again longer than what you've listed, yet I will easily be able to buy everything on it for $30. Back to school sales are the way to go where you get 10 glue sticks for $1, 10 spiral notebooks for $1, crayons for 20 cents, etc.

I will continue to buy for my children as well as donating a set of supplies for their current grade levels as long as we are able to afford to do so. I honestly am appalled at the attitudes of people in threads like these (though I've not read the replies in this one, so perhaps I'll be pleasantly surprised).

If you (general you) don't send in wet wipes or dry erase markers or paper towels or whatever else you don't think you should have to buy, guess who buys it? Your child's teacher. And if you don't think they don't notice which parents refuse to send in supplies, think again. If you honestly cannot afford it, that's one thing. But it's so common to see the attitude of 'Why should *I* have to buy *insert random item here*??', all while heading out to dinner or to fill up the tank of a giant SUV.

Your kids will use the stuff on that list. It's not free. And the schools don't have the money to buy it. That leaves the teacher. I'm not going to allow our children's teachers to buy supplies out of her own pocket as long as I can afford to send the stuff in myself.

/End of school supply rant.
post #108 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBronsil View Post

I think a reasonable comparison might be a doctor. Why are teachers not making as much as doctors?
When doctors can start practicing medicine with a 4 year degree, have multiple weeks off every year, and aren't faced with the thought of being sued for anything and everything they might ever do wrong, THEN it might be a reasonable comparison.

However, if you look at something like an orthopedic doctor, that involves a 4 year Bachelor's degree, 4 years of medical school, and 5 years of internship/residency. If he/she chooses to continue with a fellowship, that's another year.

Only then do they 'get out' and make the big bucks. And don't forget the all-too-common $100K+ worth of student loans that goes with so many years of schooling.

A teacher is done in 4 years with a MUCH lighter debt to re-pay and without the malpractice concerns/premiums.

Apples and oranges.
post #109 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarrieMF View Post
We pay for the school funding through taxes too. We aren't asked to supply extra when we go into the clinic for a shot. We aren't asked to bring in the sanitizing gel, kleenex for the waiting rooms, cleaning supplies, toilet paper, paper that goes on the beds when we come in.

As I stated the problem is the gov't & how they divide up the funding that we pay.
I absolutely get what you're saying and agree with you 100%.

However.

The fact remains that if YOU don't send in supplies for YOUR children, the *government* isn't the one forking out the difference.

That would be your child's teacher.

And that is unacceptable to me.

I have no problem whatsoever with doing things to change the system, but I draw the line at expecting the teachers to foot the bill in the meantime.
post #110 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by WC_hapamama View Post
I draw the line at toilet paper though. I also tend to buck specific brand recommendations for stuff like scissors, pencils, markers and erasers, for which I have my own preferences.
1. I'd rather my child not drip dry (or worse in the case of pooping at school) if it came down to me sending in toilet paper vs. making a 'statement' about the absurdity of having to supply toilet paper.

2. If they ask for a specific brand, it's probably for a reason. I may not know, or even agree, with whatever reason it is, but I send what they ask for if I'm financially able to do so.
post #111 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mallori View Post

I can see certain brands being better for certain things. But for things like hand sanitizer, does it matter?
Sometimes it's a storage issue. Certain brands come in certain types of bottles/boxes/whatever, and if everyone brings in the same brand, it's easier to store.

Sometimes it's that they want a pump dispenser which is totally understandable.

Sometimes, it's that a certain brand smells less offensive or dries better or leaves little hands softer...whatever...it doesn't really matter. Unless I could.not.afford. to send in what was listed, I'm not going to buck the system at this particular level for lots of reasons.
post #112 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeca View Post
I know you always have some parents that don't send things when asked. I have three in school and all those supplies all at once plus new shoes, bookbags, lunch money is a big OUCH.

It's my understanding that they can't actually make you send anything. It's public school. If you have trouble at the beginning of the year, you can always talk to your children's teachers. Tell them you need to split it up, but you'll send some tissues and hand sanitizer in a couple of months. They don't use them all at once anyway, so I'm sure that's perfectly fine.
post #113 of 157
I don't have a problem with sending school supplies. I do have a problem with dumping things like notebooks into a communal pot. My thought is that when we get there, we'll just buy a basic set for the communal pot, and I'll insist my children get the notebooks/folders/etc. that they chose. I actually have a hard time buying that the teacher could refuse that. The policy exists only to keep children who don't bring anything from feeling badly about it, though I doubt it works all that well. I agree with a pp, though, that letting parents know that's the case probably would save a good bit of hassle.

My mom was single, and we struggled financially when I was growing up. She still managed to send my supplies plus extras and then would send things she saw on sale or that our teachers said they needed. I can't tell you how many pairs of shoes and gloves she's bought over the time my sister and I were in school or how many field trips she paid for so that other children would be able to go. I just don't understand complaining about spending $50 on my child's education. If you truly have a financial hardship, don't be afraid to let the teachers know. Everywhere I've lived, there have been multiple organizations providing school supplies for children who needed it. Even our church does some of that, so I'm sure there are ways you can find the supplies if you have trouble with them. Just to refuse to get them because you're angry that you're asked to when you can afford it just hurts your child and her/his teacher.
post #114 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandiRhoades View Post
I don't have a problem with sending school supplies. I do have a problem with dumping things like notebooks into a communal pot. My thought is that when we get there, we'll just buy a basic set for the communal pot, and I'll insist my children get the notebooks/folders/etc. that they chose. I actually have a hard time buying that the teacher could refuse that.
Actually, in many schools I've worked with the "rule" is that the notebooks and whatever be plain (often an assigned color per subject and such...)

-Angela
post #115 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSwildflower View Post
My SIL is an elementary school teacher at a public school near Indianpolis. She even has to buy her own paper clips! The school does not give here a budget for ANYTHING. A lot of our family members with office supply access at their jobs send her things she needs.

I think there used to be a tax deduction for teachers b/c of their own $ they have to spend, but I think that went away a couple years ago.
No it still exists. You can get $250 back. :
post #116 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Actually, in many schools I've worked with the "rule" is that the notebooks and whatever be plain (often an assigned color per subject and such...)

-Angela
See I could see something like that more easily than just saying to get notebooks and then have your kid's choice go to someone else.
post #117 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandiRhoades View Post
See I could see something like that more easily than just saying to get notebooks and then have your kid's choice go to someone else.
Yeah, I think that would be really weird and not cool...

-Angela
post #118 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrandiRhoades View Post
I do have a problem with dumping things like notebooks into a communal pot. My thought is that when we get there, we'll just buy a basic set for the communal pot, and I'll insist my children get the notebooks/folders/etc. that they chose. I actually have a hard time buying that the teacher could refuse that. The policy exists only to keep children who don't bring anything from feeling badly about it, though I doubt it works all that well.
Our supply list is very exact. Two red folders with pockets and brads, one blue folder with pockets but no brads, one each of four specific colors of polyplastic folders, one 70 page green spiral bound notebook, etc etc etc.

The reason for this is they use each item for a specific purpose. In Kinder, the red polyplastic folder is their discipline folder, the blue polyplastic folder is their daily take home folder, the yellow folder with pockets and brads is their reading folder, etc.

Nowhere is there any room for Spiderman folders or anything of the sort, so the communal pot concept isn't a big deal at all because the items are all truly the same.

Even if they weren't, I wouldn't go in insisting my child get their own special Hello Kitty folder. We wouldn't TAKE a Hello Kitty folder to start with. End of problem. Buy something special like that to have for home, but the idea of going in on the first day insisting my child get special treatment over school supplies...not worth it.
post #119 of 157
I couldn't read ALL of the posts here but just had to chime in with my 2cents as this is an issue that drove me bonkers until we started home educating.

WHY am I paying taxes if I'm going to have to spend more money on things like TISSUES every fall when my kids go off to school. And god forbid you should have more than 1 or 2 kids....holy cow, the bill gets high every fall to buy all the stuff on their lists. I understand that the teacher takes the brunt, but it just shouldn't be so. I managed to get through my entire public school career and all I remember getting in the fall was a bookbag, some pens and pencils, a notebook and maybe some loose notebook paper for home. Even less for elementary grades. My Mom was a teacher in the Los Angeles Public Schools and she never had to spend our money on supplies for her classroom. The first year dd started school and I got the list, I was shocked, I'd never even heard of such a thing.

Not to mention, lots of the stuff that was listed were things I would never buy to feed or use with my kids at home. Hand sanitizer, antibacterial soap, bad bad stuff. Tissues with lotion in them, more chemicals. And the snacks??? One year we were even asked to each supply a box of MICROWAVE POPCORN!

And FWIW home educating does not have to be expensive.
post #120 of 157
Ok, in terms of homeschooling costing more, it will vary by family. However, add in the taxes that are suppose to go to a local school that homeschooling families never see, then yes it is even more.

That gripe aside, I'm still not getting why after what people pay into property taxes, city taxes, county taxes, there isn't enough for teacher to be able to supply simple supplies like crayons, paper, markers, erasers, rulers, etc. without parents needing to supply tissues, scissors, and hand sanitizer. Am I the only one who wonders about this? I see many saying they are fine with supplying what their school requires.
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