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Holy cow. If I have to buy all these supplies, why aren't I just homeschooling? - Page 7

post #121 of 157
Not all of those taxes go for education, obviously.

The fact is that most US schools are VERY poorly funded.
post #122 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by heket View Post
Ok, in terms of homeschooling costing more, it will vary by family. However, add in the taxes that are suppose to go to a local school that homeschooling families never see, then yes it is even more.

That gripe aside, I'm still not getting why after what people pay into property taxes, city taxes, county taxes, there isn't enough for teacher to be able to supply simple supplies like crayons, paper, markers, erasers, rulers, etc. without parents needing to supply tissues, scissors, and hand sanitizer. Am I the only one who wonders about this? I see many saying they are fine with supplying what their school requires.
Well.... I would rather they pay teachers a living wage and I have to send in markers.

I would rather they repair buildings that are filled with mold and falling down and I still need to send in folders.

I would rather they meet the needs of students at the top and bottom and not just in the middle and I still need to send in pencils.

I would rather they purchase up to date text books and I still need to send in scissors and glue....

School funding is short. This is nothing new (I had the same lists when I was in school) but there are a million things I'd rather they fund first. I really don't have a problem asking parents to supply things like paper and crayons.

-Angela
post #123 of 157
This year our parent council did a new fund raiser. They worked with a school supply company to get bulk deals. Less expensive than even the back to school sales. They put together packages of what is needed for each grade level. So I could buy all the supplies for grade 3 in one go, spend less money, time and gas than I would have running around and some of the money goes to support school activities.

I think after reading some of the responses here (I haven't read the whole thread) I'm going to suggest that they put out the list a little earlier and offer a payment plan for those families who would have trouble paying for it all at once.
post #124 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by heket View Post
That gripe aside, I'm still not getting why after what people pay into property taxes, city taxes, county taxes, there isn't enough for teacher to be able to supply simple supplies like crayons, paper, markers, erasers, rulers, etc. without parents needing to supply tissues, scissors, and hand sanitizer. Am I the only one who wonders about this? I see many saying they are fine with supplying what their school requires.
Ask to see your local school district's budget. They have to supply it to you. Then ask why they're spending so much on certain items. School districts have their hands tied by state governments. In Ohio, for example, there are 2 different trash cans the schools can buy. They're $17 each, though the same one at Target is $5. The state has a contract with the other company, though. When I was a reporter, I looked at many school districts' budgets. In *most* cases, they're not wasting money. Transportation and salary take up about 80 percent of most budgets, and much of the rest is tied into items the school is required to provide. There's really very little discretionary portion of school districts' budgets.
post #125 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by wifeandmom View Post
Even if they weren't, I wouldn't go in insisting my child get their own special Hello Kitty folder. We wouldn't TAKE a Hello Kitty folder to start with. End of problem. Buy something special like that to have for home, but the idea of going in on the first day insisting my child get special treatment over school supplies...not worth it.
The original point was that many schools aren't clear about the communal supplies. Parents don't realize and allow their children to pick out something special only to have it go to a kid 2 rows over on the first day of school. To be honest, I oppose the communal thing entirely because I don't think they make children whose parents can't or won't bring supplies feel better. My kids still will know we brought more than required, and I'd imagine they all know who didn't, too. When I was a child, teachers sent home notes saying, "we really need X more boxes of pencils, Y more notebooks, and Z more tissues if anyone can send them." Then the kids who didn't bring anything got their supplies quietly from the teacher; no production of passing out supplies involved.

The chances that our kids will go to school anywhere with this method of doling out supplies is non-existent, but yes, it is something I would insist on because *I* am in charge of my child's education, and that includes the supplies they're using. If we try to make everyone the same, then I think it bleeds into other aspects of education. And, really, what does it matter from a teacher's perspective if I bring in folders and then allow my child to bring one in, too? Everyone still has a folder, and that's the problem the teacher's trying to solve.
post #126 of 157
Our schools have the supply lists, but I know that as a teacher I can't actually require that the students bring anything other than their bodies to school. Many parents bring the supplies, many don't. We have supplies for kids who can't afford it. For classroom supplies we generally have 1000 dollars for our department for the year. That is for 7 teachers (middle school though, so we see close to 200 kids a day, though we share many of the kids. . . so, not sure how that works out). Last year I spent $500 dollars out of pocket, mostly on books, manuipulative and a writing class. I get a tax break for $250 of that.
post #127 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristyM26 View Post
No it still exists. You can get $250 back. :
Actually, it just subtracts 250 from my taxable income, so I it seemed like more a symbolic tax break than anything.
post #128 of 157
Well, yeah, but it's better than nothing. I wasn't saying that it was good, just that it still exists in some form.
post #129 of 157
I work in an early childhood school.

Ziploc baggies in K-aged children = use to send home pee-pee panties if/when an accident occurs. Much appreciated!

Also, if your kids do any cooking projects, Ziplocs carry them home... and a few other things.

So Ziplocs may seem weird, but they make sense to me!
post #130 of 157
Our list for school is similar to the others, except that no name brands are requested.

I don't have a problem providing exactly what the teachers request (and beyond) because I don't feel that they are abusive in their requests. My ds' school provides wonderful art supplies (Cra Pas, watercolor pencils, beautiful paint) that I'm certain comes out of teacher funds or are provided by the teachers themselves. I can easily provide pencils, folders, etc.

Also, my ds' school doesn't have desks, but has work tables so communal supplies are the only way to go. He has a cubby in his room where his specific folder is held, but it wouldn't hold all of the other supplies (crayons, markers, glue, tape, etc.) that they need. The students are able to decorate their individual folder at the beginning of the year and then it is laminated so it holds up all year long. Frankly, I don't really want my ds to use a "Spiderman" folder anyway!

Also, my ds' school has a specific room in the school where families are encouraged to bring in items such as fabric, soda pop caps, buttons, wire, yarn, metal objects (nuts and bolts, screws, etc.) and anything else that can be re-used for projects and they don't need to be new. Around the school you can see beautiful murals where children have used natural items (leafs, sticks, sand) as well as the recycled items to create wonderful art. It's amazing to see mobiles created of of pop caps and wire that look like they belong in an art museum. His school is extremely creative with all supplies. Maybe that's why I don't object to providing all the communal supplies that we are asked to donate - especially when I know that so many families struggle to provide balanced meals at home.
post #131 of 157
Both Target and WalMart have stocked their back to school aisles.
post #132 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by tm2840 View Post
I work in an early childhood school.

Ziploc baggies in K-aged children = use to send home pee-pee panties if/when an accident occurs. Much appreciated!

Also, if your kids do any cooking projects, Ziplocs carry them home... and a few other things.

So Ziplocs may seem weird, but they make sense to me!
For the older kids, Ziplocs are handy to keep things like flashcards together rather than floating around in desks and backpacks.
post #133 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by quinnsmum View Post
I have said this before, and I say it again..It is NOT the teacher's responsibility to pay for these items. Nor should it be mine. We pay enough in taxes, yet our money is going to protect oil and who knows where-else. Then we have to find these items that the teacher suggests on sale or cheap and those cheap items are made in another country, and not supporting this country which doesn't help our economy at all. (Which is another soapbox entirely.) At some point we have to stand up and demand better funding for our children. A far better investment than petrol, I'd say.
1.Used to be a time when people had to BUY their own books for public school - my mom specifically mentioned having to do it for h.s. in the early 60s, but she made comments that implied it was for earlier grades, too.

2. Not sure where you're located, but in my area (IL), the majority p.s. funding comes from LOCAL property taxes, not federal.
post #134 of 157
the only difference i see in these lists than the ones is used (i graduated in 2001) is the hand sinatizer/baby wipes/ziplock bags type stuff... oh, and dry erase markers, but we still had chalk boards in elementary, lol, and i seem to recall buying chalk

we had pencils, paper, note books, crayons, (markers, and colored pencils and pens as we got older) construction and manila paper(i never see that anymore!) erasers, tissues, and other stuff i cant remember too

i understand the brand requests, to a certain extent too. crayola crayons are so much better than the other brands
post #135 of 157
The school supply lists are long, but I understand why they have them. The schools need the supplies, and probably some families don't bring all of the suggested supplies in.

I have found that right about now (nearing the end of July) is the best time to buy school supplies. I went to Walmart recently and found that they had spiral notebooks for $0.05 each. I bought a ton. They also had Elmer's glue and glue sticks for $0.22 each. Crayola 24-pack crayons for $0.22 each. Crayola markers and colored pencils for $0.88 each. I bought a bunch of stuff and only paid a couple dollars. Every year, I wait for the sales and just buy a bunch. Walgreens usually puts the Bic and Papermate pens on sale for $0.10 one week. They also put the pencil sharpeners, erasers, rulers, and all sorts of stuff on sale for about $0.10 at least one week during the Summer (usually end of July or beginning of August). I still have a nice stockpile from last year. My older daughter wants an expensive zipper binder. I told her I am willing to pay more for a nice binder and a nice backpack, other than that they need to shop from my own little store (stockpile). They were happy with that.
post #136 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ContentMom View Post
I have found that right about now (nearing the end of July) is the best time to buy school supplies. I went to Walmart recently and found that they had spiral notebooks for $0.05 each. I bought a ton.
I just did this too for my middle school classroom so the students who don't/won't bring supplies will have something to write on. My classroom budget for 135 kids is $50 per year.
post #137 of 157
I am fine w/what my dd has to bring to school. But then the other day my SIL showed me her list at her dd's school (same district mind you) and her list was HALF of what we had. I was pretty surprised.
post #138 of 157
I don't have an issue with the kids supply lists, but I hate that they change year to year (last year we had 80 pencils on DS list ) But they must do community lists and look what is needed to restock the next year. No pencils or paper this year.

Why, oh why can't they just do the 24 pack crayons? It's what I send anyway - I refuse to pay 5x as much for an 8 pack.

KINDERGARTEN
20 glue sticks
3 boxes of Primary Color Broad Tip Washable Markers
1 tray of Prang or Crayola Watercolor Paints (8 colors)
3 boxes of Crayola Crayons (8 colors)
1 box of Kleenex tissues

FIRST-GRADE
Standard size pencil box ---5”x8”x2”
1 pair of Fiskar scissors ---blunt point
4 pink oblong erasers
5 jumbo glue sticks – Elmers
2 packages – 12 count Crayola colored pencils
1 package – 8 count Crayola washable thick classic markers
1 package – 8 count Crayola washable thin classic markers
3 packages – 16 count Crayola classic crayons
1 three ring binder with see thru slip 1-1/2”
1 Family size box of tissues
1 ream of white copy paper

*Boys:
1 box gallon size Ziploc bags
1 box snack size Ziploc bags
*Girls:
1 container (35 wipes) of disinfectant Clorox Wipes (bleach free)
1 extra box of family size tissues

*Gym: gym shoes
*Art: pocket folder with name, grade, and room number
Art shirt marked with names on the collars
post #139 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1xmom View Post
I agree, the supply list is pretty typical around here. This year my dd is going into 3rd grade and in addition to the standard folders, post-it note pads, pencils, glue, etc., she needs a 1gb jump drive.

I have to say though, that she did end up bringing things back home at the end of the year so things liker her scissors and pencil case/sharpener will be re-used for next year.

When my dd was in 1st grade it seems she was always needing crayons (I always stock up and got them 10 cents a box of 24 Crayola at Wal-Mart). When I asked her halfway through the year and coming home w/her 3rd request for crayons, come to find out, a little girl beside her didn't have any so she would always share.
This happened when I was in 1st grade. The girl next to me didnt have crayons. A few weeks into school I told my Dad while grocery shopping I needed more crayons. So I put them in my school bag and gave them to her Monday. No one was the wiser. My parents never knew and neither did anyone at school.



OTH,
The list looks normal to me. Ours is more or less the same. Never mind also the back pack, gym shoes that stay at school, fund raisers, registration fees, pta fundraisers, field trips where there might be an extra cost, it goes on and on. I havent factored in birthday parties of other students when you get invited or other related costs like this.

Our schools are by no means under funded and we have a great school. There are students in the class who will have issues with this. I always over buy and pay extra for a few students in the class because I know there is a hardship there for some people.
post #140 of 157

My daughter will start Kindergarten in Sept

This list just said Kindergarten 08-09 no school name and it was by the school stuff at the local Target.

Brown lunch bags
White lunch bags
Zip lock bags assorted sizes
Elmer's white glue bottles * notice it's a brand name*
1 pair of child sharp tipped scissors*fiskars metal only*
1 box of 8 large Crayola,Prang or Sargent crayons
Pencils
2 reams of white copy paper
Stickers,variety of sizes
Glue Sticks
Headphones for computer lab WTF: the school should pay for these
hand sanitize bottles
1 box of kleenex tissues
2 packages of baby wipes
Backpack(minimum 12" wide) NO rolling backpacks
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