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Holy cow. If I have to buy all these supplies, why aren't I just homeschooling? - Page 8

post #141 of 157
[QUOTE=DustysSweety03;11745105][color=teal]
My daughter will start Kingergarten in Sept

This is the general list for Kindergarten that i grabbed at the local Target a few days back.....
/QUOTE]

Was this list for your specific school, or what Target wants you to get?

Definitely wait on the headphones -- that seems a little weird to me.
post #142 of 157
The headphones are a health dept thing in some places. Kids keep their own in a baggie with their name, since they could theoretically spread head lice.
post #143 of 157
[QUOTE=LauraLoo;11745200]
Quote:
Originally Posted by DustysSweety03 View Post
[color=teal]


Definitely wait on the headphones -- that seems a little weird to me.
We had to buy them last year and have them in a ziplock bag. Liz used them at least twice a week. And she needs them this year as well. DH is using them right now for studying he is doing on a dvd so they are coming in handy. We figure Maggie will use them too in a few years.

We bought them at Radioshack
post #144 of 157
I live in Northern Ontario, graduated high school in 2000 - never, ever saw a list like that.

Dd just went to junior kindergarten this year, and the only thing she needed was a backpack/lunch pail. And yeah, we asked if there was anything extra the teacher needed - she said the school had it all covered.

This is the Catholic school board.
post #145 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heavenly View Post
Trust me, homeschooling costs ALOT more than that. I don't view that list as excessive at all.
I totally disagree. Homeschooling doesn't need to cost that much at all.

To the OP: When my nieces started kindergarten, they had all those things on their lists and more. For example, I recall seeing antibacterial ointment on their lists, they had to bring a snack *every month* (a schedule was sent home on the first day), and they had to purchase school uniforms as well. Yes, for a public school. sure, they had a uniform closet where you could trade for hand-me-downs or purchase them inexpensively, but I remember my sister looking through and finding nothing that would fit my scrawny little niece (who was, at that time, just barely in a 4 slim).
post #146 of 157
It's very typical around here too, plus a hefty "enrichment fee" of about a hundred bucks -- plus CONSTANT fundraising that is put on the children.

Homeschooling is a little bit more expensive than our local public school, but not by much.
post #147 of 157
This has been an interesting post. My kid goes to a mediocre school and her supply list for kindy is in post 9. I also looked at MY schools post for kindy - very rich school. Here's what they need:

Kindergarten
Two marble notebooks
One supply box
One box of crayons (24 count)
Pencils
Elmer’s Squeeze Glue
Glue sticks
Two pocket folders (pockets on the bottom)

A LOT less stuff. No markers, dry erase markers, plastic forks or plates, no kleenex, no scotch tape or play dough. Basically no classroom supplies are needed.
post #148 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by annethcz View Post
I don't think that seems excessive. At my kids' school they ask parents to donate $25/child for shared supplies at the beginning of the year. I have no problem providing the basics for my kids, that's my job as a parent.
I so wish our schools did this! It irks me to buy all that stuff when I know it costs more money to divvy it up that way. I'd much rather contribute $25 or so of school fees and let them order cases of tissues and paper from Staples and get the discount than us having to go buy all this junk. They're very particular, too, and want "black non-spiral bound composition books" for example. I mean, it's one thing if my kid gets to pick out her own special kitty notebook, but where's the joy in going and doing someone else's shopping list?! Let them buy it in bulk and save a few bucks and I'll give them the money! FTR, my list is similar to the OPs, including tissues and glue sticks and boxes of plain pencils, etc.
post #149 of 157
I was honestly surprised at how expensive it was for my daughter to attend free public school. In addition to the supplies list, which included things like paper towels, plates, napkins, baggies, hand sanitizer, plus all the typical school supplies, there were also too many times to count that the adults at the school pushed children to ask parents to buy things like grossly overpriced tubs of cookie dough, wrapping paper, books, yearbooks, tshirts, etc.

Did I already mention the stiff enrichment fee as well? When I pulled her out to homeschool, they forgot to give me a refund on that fee!
post #150 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post
I so wish our schools did this! It irks me to buy all that stuff when I know it costs more money to divvy it up that way. I'd much rather contribute $25 or so of school fees and let them order cases of tissues and paper from Staples and get the discount than us having to go buy all this junk. They're very particular, too, and want "black non-spiral bound composition books" for example. I mean, it's one thing if my kid gets to pick out her own special kitty notebook, but where's the joy in going and doing someone else's shopping list?! Let them buy it in bulk and save a few bucks and I'll give them the money! FTR, my list is similar to the OPs, including tissues and glue sticks and boxes of plain pencils, etc.
Have you written a letter to the PTO/PTA and the principal with this idea? They might be interested.
post #151 of 157
I was in Kindergarden 17 years ago... lol. And my school supply list was very long. But we did almost always use all of the supplies we had to buy.

My mother works as a teacher and every year she has to buy her kids basic supplies, like notebooks and paper and pencils. Parent's either don't buy it or can't afford it. She's a special education teacher so she only has to buy them for 10-20 students (depending on if she's doing self-contained or teaching a subject). It runs her $200-$400 depending on if she decides to get "extra's" like art supplies. Then she has to spend money on supplies for the classroom like chalk, dry erase markers, posters, books, lesson plan books, computer programs, poster putty, tissue, wet wipes, soap, fans... her classroom can run her $1000-$1500 per year just for the basics to keep her room running. And this doesn't include when she has to pay for a child's lunch or a field trip because the parents can't afford it, or when she has to buy a child their uniform because the one they are wearing is stained and falling apart. And she isn't one of those teachers making $60,000+ she is just getting by. Imagine what she could get for $1000 if she didn't have to pay for the basics needed to run a classroom? Or if each parent contributed $30-$100 in supplies??? This year she has to refurbish her dry erase board because the school won't pay for it and it isn't readable. Her school doesn't reimburse most of her expenses- some of it is tax deductible though.

So yes, if you don't buy your children the supplies it will fall on the teacher, and will take away from the teachers budget for manipulative's and taking continuing education/graduate courses. If you can't afford the supplies then see what assistance programs are available. The good thing is that most big box stores sell 10 cent notebooks and folders, and you can sometimes get a 16 pack of crayola's usually for 30 cents...
post #152 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by homefrontgirl View Post
Have you written a letter to the PTO/PTA and the principal with this idea? They might be interested.
Well, it's a small private school and my feeling is that everyone else likes it this way so I guess I'll just grit my teeth and go along...
post #153 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by 34me View Post
Unfortunately, it's a pretty typical list for our area. The thing that really bugged me about the Kindergarten list is that I got all the stuff and then they dumped it all into "communiy" supplies so we got nothing back - even the scissors. Now how many scissors do you need?
That really bothers me, too. My brother would get so frustrated because whey put all the crayons together, then gave each kid an assortment. He didn't get all the colors back. He did get to keep his scissors though.
post #154 of 157
My brother is now in fifth grade, and his list this year is as follows:

2 5 subject notebooks
1 1" binder
2-3 packs wide ruled paper
composition book
loose leaf gaph paper
2 packs #2 pencils
markers
colored pencils
dry erase markers
tissues
baby wipes
blank CDs
and a few other things...
post #155 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by libranbutterfly View Post
That really bothers me, too. My brother would get so frustrated because whey put all the crayons together, then gave each kid an assortment. He didn't get all the colors back. He did get to keep his scissors though.
But for kindergarten community supplies really does work best. My DD attends school in a district where there is a very high population of students living beneath the poverty level - if hey did not bring supplies in at the start of the year the teacher could not ask for them again, she just had to make do with what she had. By having community supplies no one was ever without. Sure, they might not always have a green crayon ready to use at all times but they had crayons there at all times. As far as scissors, in my DD's classroom they were shared as well - from a total of 52 kids bringing supplies in at the start of the year the teacher didn't have enough for her large morning class to each have their own to use each day.
post #156 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCMoulton View Post
As far as scissors, in my DD's classroom they were shared as well - from a total of 52 kids bringing supplies in at the start of the year the teacher didn't have enough for her large morning class to each have their own to use each day.
Please tell me there weren't 52 kinder in your DD's class!
post #157 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by heket View Post
Please tell me there weren't 52 kinder in your DD's class!
They were divided between morning and afternoon, 27 morning & 25 afternoon.
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