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Holy cow. If I have to buy all these supplies, why aren't I just homeschooling? - Page 5

post #81 of 157
First, yes, the list looks normal to me. Ours (pubic school) was even longer for Kindy. We had lists like that in the early 70s and 80s too. (without things like hand sanitizer, but we did have kleenex and pencil boxes and specific sizes of Crayola crayons)

I was a volunteer para for my son for the first 4 weeks of Kindy last year and saw why it is so important to send what you can. There were kids that showed up the first day of school and weren't able to come to the classroom because the social worker had to do things like find appropriate shoes for kids who only had one pair of flip flops (and they were falling apart).

There are truly kids out there that come from extremely poor families and they aren't able to bring any supplies. It amazes me that there are so many people on this thread that are angry about communal supplies and being asked to participate in the financial burden of running a classroom. For all of the talk of "it takes a village" that I hear on MDC, it seems that even here it goes away pretty quickly when you are expected to be a part of the village.

Because so many teachers have to spend their own money to help the students that need it, I make it a practice to always send a target or walmart gift card for Christmas/End of Year presents, even if it is a small amount, to support their efforts (and not make them deal with another knick knack)
post #82 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennifer Z View Post
It amazes me that there are so many people on this thread that are angry about communal supplies and being asked to participate in the financial burden of running a classroom. For all of the talk of "it takes a village" that I hear on MDC, it seems that even here it goes away pretty quickly when you are expected to be a part of the village.
I'm more aware of this after yrs of having kids in school. However, I have to admit that I initially fell into the category of being resentful when my girls first started school primarily b/c it wasn't made clear that these supplies would be shared.

My girls picked out "special" folders with kitties, purple supply boxes, extra large colored pencils with certain colors and fancy patterns, etc. -- you get the idea. We didn't realize that they wouldn't get to keep any of this. They were upset when the teacher put all of the folders in one pile, for instance, and then doled them out evenly giving my dd race car folders and giving her kitty folders to another girl.

Now that we are aware that they won't get to keep the things they select, we don't pick out supplies that they have their hearts set on. If the schools are more transparent about this, I would hope that the parents (and kids) would be less upset and mellow like we have over the years .
post #83 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristaN View Post
My girls picked out "special" folders with kitties, purple supply boxes, extra large colored pencils with certain colors and fancy patterns, etc. -- you get the idea. We didn't realize that they wouldn't get to keep any of this. They were upset when the teacher put all of the folders in one pile, for instance, and then doled them out evenly giving my dd race car folders and giving her kitty folders to another girl.
well that does suck!

Our personal school supplies were always ours (folder, pencils, pens, notebook paper) and the communal stuff was the kleenex and manila paper (does anyone have to bring this any more?)

It is good to know some school do this (seriously it never occurred to me my kids folders wouldn't be theirs) and ask the teacher before picking out anything personal or special for your child.
post #84 of 157
I'm in the UK and I've never heard of anyone here having to supplies crayons etc.

When I was at school (way back) we each had a tin of crayons. At the end of the year they were collected back and new labels stuck on for next years class. I don't remember anyone having a problem that they crayons weren't new.

I can see some things getting lost/used up but do you really need to get a new pair of scissors every year. Where do last years go if they are not sent home?
post #85 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommy68 View Post
But did you ever ask the teacher if she needed something anyway? Perhaps she was paying out part of the $$ herself.
I worked in southern Ontario in the early 1990s and I can state for sure that teachers did not have to buy basic supplies. Some bought extra-fancy supplies for their own reasons, but no one had to buy regular stuff.

Times may have changed but at that time the school board would do some research and then buy in massive bulk for all the kids. Then all the kids got the same supplies, and the cost was picked up as a part of the school funding as if those supplies were essential – which they were. And no, things were not fancy or new all the time (crayons, for example).

But I prefer that model because taxes are generally where we as society try to even costs out a bit – bigger homes, higher property tax, etc.
post #86 of 157
Why is this a norm?
post #87 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by heket View Post
Why is this a norm?
Not sure what you're asking...

School budgets cover the barest of bare supplies. Parents supply the rest. When parents don't/can't PTA/PTOs step in. If they aren't there or don't have the money, then teachers fill the void.

I have worked and observed in a number of public elementary schools. In NONE of them did they have any kind of school stash of basic kid supplies (paper, folders, notebooks, pencils, crayons etc)

-Angela
post #88 of 157
It just always has abeen a bring your own supplies affair for me. I know I went to school every year with a big grocery bag full of supplies as well as a pretty good stock pile at home. and that started in 1980. this is nothing new in public schools.

actually I think it is kinda weird that teachers dole out stuff. how does that teach kids to be resonsible for their things.

and yeah it sucked being the kid with no cool supplies but I lived.

Also we have a charity here that supplies a new back pack full of school supplie to all students who need them (through elementry school what is neeeded is standard and individual teachers may not ask for more) from preschool through college. Supplies are donated year round by people in the community. One grocery store sells a back pack full of supplies for $5. it won't completely cover you but it will sure get you started.
post #89 of 157
So I decided to see how much this original list would cost in these parts . . .

2x tissues generic - $2
2x folders $.20
1 spiral notebook $.10
1 box markers $1
1 box dry erase markers $7
10x large gluesticks $5
2 boxes of crayons (crayola please) $.50
1 box #2 ticonderoga pencil $2
colored pencils (crayola please) $1
3x box of ziploc bags (various sizes) $7.50 (good heavens! exactly what will they do with all these bags?)
pink erasers $1
2 liquid anti-bac soap generic - $2.50
band aids generic $2.50
1 hand sanitizer $1.50
4x6 spiral index cards $3
2 boxes baby wipes $4
colored or white copy paper $4

and those are generous estimates . . . . so max we are looking at $50 plus a back pack which can be found for around $15.

thats really not that bad and really there are just a couple things pushing that up like zip locks and glue and dry erase markers (these should really be provided by the school).
post #90 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by lilyka View Post
actually I think it is kinda weird that teachers dole out stuff. how does that teach kids to be resonsible for their things.
IME it varies by age and socio/economic area. In higher income areas it has been more likely that kids keep their own stuff. In lower areas it seems more likely to be community property- for obvious reasons.

Also younger kids do better with class supplies in general.

-Angela
post #91 of 157
The list looks pretty typical to me.

I teach in public school, but I am a specialist (special ed resource), so do not give out an additional supply list. I get the basic supplies I need, but the things I can't afford with my allotted classroom $$ are expensive adaptive equipment and ink cartridges for my personal printer that I have to use to keep my kids' paperwork confidential. I can't really ask parents for that. I write grant proposals to the PTA for that kind of stuff.

My son has brought all of the above to school. And if I see glue sticks or ticonderoga pencils (they really are the only ones that reliably don't splinter in the pencil sharpener or lose their leads!) on sale somewhere throughout the year, I'll send more in.

One thing to consider is that it is not like the teacher goes through everyone's bag and checks to see if everything is there before she lets the kid come in to learn. Maybe she assumes that not everyone will get ziploc bags or antibacterial wipes, so asks for more? I'd just send in what you can, and don't sweat it.

I did have to purchase my own copy paper at one school where I worked, and it was a hardship, as I was not married yet and only living on the 22K I made as a teacher. We had no books and were allowed 200 copies a year, and after that, we had to bring our own paper. I bought everything I used that year, and ate beans and rice.

L.
post #92 of 157
Looks about right to me. Our K list was actually a bit more than that, including things like 35 mm film for the teacher to take pictures with. At the end of the year she gave each child an album filled with pictures and a dvd with pictures set to music in addition to many other books and portfolios of ds's work that he'd done throughout the year. We also had a $20 lab fee at the beginning of the year.

I just spent $100 on the supply list for my 2 children and that didn't include things like backpacks or lunch bags, that was JUST the classroom supply lists. As a public school parent I am happy to do that if it means the teacher isn't going to have to spend money out of her own pocket. I know that our K teacher, even with all the supplies and money we put in, still spends money out of her own pocket each year. She goes above and beyond though! We're in a huge budget crisis in CA so either the parents have to pony up, the teachers have to spend their own money, or the kids go without certain things. I would rather my child not go without. I wish the state did a better job of managing the tax money but they don't and that isn't the school's fault.
post #93 of 157
The list looks about right. Here is what I need to buy for this coming year. People wonder why I start shopping at the start of the summer.
Kindergarten
2 - box of 8-16 crayons
1 - pair of Fiskars scissors
3 - bottles of washable ELMERS glue (no gels or “no-run”
glue). Other brands do not work as well.
1 - package of pencils
1 - box of washable markers
2 - boxes of Kleenex
2 - containers of Clorox or Lysol wipes
1 - 8 oz bottle of hand sanitizer,
1 - bottle of liquid soap
2 - box of Ziploc baggies (sandwich or snack size)

Second grade
1 - 24 pack of #2 pencils (no mechanical pencils)
2 - boxes of Kleenex
1 - pair of 4 1/2” - 5 1/2” Fiskars brand scissors
3 - glue sticks
2 - large pink erasers (no novelty erasers)
1 - plastic supply box
2 - pocket folders w/prong fasteners
1 - box of 24 crayons (no markers)
2 - single subject spiral notebooks (wide-ruled)
1 - ruler (inches and centimeters)
1 - 8 oz or larger bottle of hand sanitizer
1 - container of Clorox or Lysol wipes
1 - box of gallon sized zippered baggies (girls only)
1 - box of sandwich sized zippered baggies (boys only)

Fifth grade
1 - ruler (inches and centimeters)
1 - CLEAN sock (for erasing)
1 - box large zippered baggies
1 - box sandwich or snack sized zippered baggies
3 - boxes regular wooden pencils (no mechanical pencils)
1 - 4 pack of dry erase markers
6 - spiral one subject wide-ruled notebooks with plain cover
1 - 1” three ring binder
6 - folders (pocket w/clasp)
6 - packages of wide-ruled notebook paper (250 sheets each)
2 - glue sticks
1 - box of colored pencils
1 - box of 12-24 crayons
1 - hand held pencil sharpener with shavings compartment
3 - boxes of Kleenex
2 - bottles of hand sanitizer
2 - containers of disinfecting wipes
1 - pencil bag (no pencil boxes please)
3 - large pink erasers
6 - packages of 3x5 lined index cards
2 - clean and empty clear 2 liter bottles
4 - highlighters (1 green, 1 yellow, 1 pink, 1 blue)
post #94 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
Not sure what you're asking...

School budgets cover the barest of bare supplies. Parents supply the rest. When parents don't/can't PTA/PTOs step in. If they aren't there or don't have the money, then teachers fill the void.

I have worked and observed in a number of public elementary schools. In NONE of them did they have any kind of school stash of basic kid supplies (paper, folders, notebooks, pencils, crayons etc)

-Angela
I guess that's my question, why is it a norm for schools to cover the barest of supplies? When I went to kinder, my mom had bought me a new back pack and basic supplies *for me* (pencils, crayons, some paper, maybe some other misc. items), but not things like tissues to go into a community supply. She would also send things in when asked by the teacher for special ocassions.

I know that others experiences vary, but why has society become so complacent that public schools, funded by public monies, still are lacking in basic school supplies? (And that's more rhetorical than looking for a direct answer.)
post #95 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by heket View Post
I guess that's my question, why is it a norm for schools to cover the barest of supplies? When I went to kinder, my mom had bought me a new back pack and basic supplies *for me* (pencils, crayons, some paper, maybe some other misc. items), but not things like tissues to go into a community supply. She would also send things in when asked by the teacher for special ocassions.

I know that others experiences vary, but why has society become so complacent that public schools, funded by public monies, still are lacking in basic school supplies? (And that's more rhetorical than looking for a direct answer.)
It's a good question. And of course has no answer.

I *will* say that I have also worked at a private school. Now the one big difference is that the private school had VERY small classes (usually 8 students) BUT, teachers were paid a GREAT deal less than public schools but we (the school) did provide ALL supplies. Paper, crayons, folders, scissors, etc. You name it. School bought it. And tuition there is now around $11,000 a year. Public school doesn't spend anywhere NEAR that per student. I think, last numbers I saw, average around here was less than $3000 a kid.

-Angela
post #96 of 157
I guess I'm pretty lucky. The public school I teach in gives me enough money each year to buy supplies for all my kids. I don't ask them to buy anything.
post #97 of 157
I can't read all of the posts but I did want to add my thoughts. As a teacher in a Title 1 school I can only hope of getting parents to bring in communal supplies. The funds in the community just aren't there. Our public school provides us with:
1500 sheets of copy paper per month ( split among 31 students is approx 2-3 sheets per day)
fat crayola crayons (so not cool for the big kids)
thick markers
standard color whiteboard markers
standard stick pens
1 pencil per student per month
file folders
hanging file folders
labels
plain journals and some composition journals
Standard felt tip pens for teachers
erasers
generic office supplies
generic tissue
hand soap
anti-bacterial pump
tape and dispensers

Over the years we sometimes have had surplus funds that teachers were able to spend at an Office Supply store. In those years I purchased a heavy duty three-hole punch, electric pencil sharpener, corkboard and other heavy duty things.

This is what I will routinely buy for my students beginning in July:
35 each red, blue and green folders with prongs
9 boxes of thin markers
9 boxes of thin crayons
9 individual pencil sharpeners
18 scissors
9 boxes of colored pencils
name tags

For myself/classroom:
pens and pencils for myself
fadeless bulletin paper
borders
punch-out letters
1 ream of cardstock
stickers
new activity books to keep my learning alive!

All in all I spend about $200 to begin the year. Any little bit I get from parents is very thankful! I wish I was the teacher in some of your classrooms!
post #98 of 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecoteat View Post
I guess I'm pretty lucky. The public school I teach in gives me enough money each year to buy supplies for all my kids. I don't ask them to buy anything.
Wow! That *IS* lucky.

When I taught in public school here the PTO (not the school...) gave every teacher $50 towards supplies, curriculum materials, bulletin board materials, etc.

And that was the exception- we had a good PTO.

-Angela
post #99 of 157
I don't mind helping out with school supplies or snacks but when you are asking for a TON of stuff at once is a bit much. I would rather get a note saying we need such and such a few times through the year. I always respond better to those.
post #100 of 157
My SIL is an elementary school teacher at a public school near Indianpolis. She even has to buy her own paper clips! The school does not give here a budget for ANYTHING. A lot of our family members with office supply access at their jobs send her things she needs.

I think there used to be a tax deduction for teachers b/c of their own $ they have to spend, but I think that went away a couple years ago.
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