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"White" Native Americans? - Page 4

post #61 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineR View Post
What opinion is that? That I have no idea where my people are coming from when they discriminate against me because of the colour of my skin? That I really just have no clue of the trials and tribulations that my people have gone through in the last several centuries? That I'm just an ignorant white girl trying to "play Indian" because it's "in style"?
You wouldn't be the first one to assume those things, and I doubt you will be the last. I understand and I try very hard not to take offense because I *do* know where it's coming from.
Yeah, those assumptions. In my defense, I've seen far more white people trying to play Indian then I've seen people like you- people who are connected and informed. And as you've said, it something that can't be weeded out by first glance.
post #62 of 87
*cross posted in the "Are those your children?" thread*

To get a good visual of what a bumpy road genes are, look up Alicia and Jasmin Singer, or Remee and Kian Hodgson. These pictures really illuminate the fact that we don't know anybody's heritage just by looking.
post #63 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by theretohere View Post
Yeah, those assumptions. In my defense, I've seen far more white people trying to play Indian then I've seen people like you- people who are connected and informed. And as you've said, it something that can't be weeded out by first glance.
No offense intended, but has it occurred to you that perhaps you would see more people "like me" if people *like me* didn't come up against such opposition in claiming their heritage and were not stalemated at every turn when they tried to learn about it?
For your information, the things I have posted about so far on here are things that anyone with an interest in Constitutional law and an interest in history could find easily. It's not like I'm talking about the conditions under which children were forcibly detained/arrested for "relocation" to the internment camps known as residential schools.
post #64 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FormerlyKnownAs View Post
*cross posted in the "Are those your children?" thread*

To get a good visual of what a bumpy road genes are, look up Alicia and Jasmin Singer, or Remee and Kian Hodgson. These pictures really illuminate the fact that we don't know anybody's heritage just by looking.
Yes, the black/white twins are an absolutely perfect reminder to those of us who might judge based on appearances that you just never know.
Thanks for those, FormerlyKnownAs.
post #65 of 87
I'm 1/4 Cherokee and 1/8 Chickasaw. I'm going to school in Washington right now, but I want to get back to Oklahoma as soon as possible. I've heard it said that the five civilized tribes were the closest to white when whites settled here, and that today they've out-whited the whites. I don't know about that, but I'm pretty sure my grandma only married my grandpa because he was the only blond, blue-eyed Indian at Chilocco Indian School.

Growing up, I went to Indian Education and danced with the Indian Dance Troupe at cultural festivals and parades. I went to pow-wows and spoke some limited Cherokee with parts of my family. I went to a lot of funerals and noticed the difference between when someone on my dad's side died (and everyone silently held back tears) and when someone on my mom's side died (and people wailed and held one another).

In context, I never felt out of place. People commented on my eyes (light blue), but I never felt shunned. I didn't truly realize I don't look Indian until I went away to college. A Spokane boy called me white girl, and that really threw me off. Several years later, I saw him in a bar. I was drunk and yelled at him about that. He backed down and apologized (he was probably thinking, "Who is this crazy white girl?"), and I felt really terrible later. I don't drink anymore.

I get student financial aid from the Chickasaw Nation. I graduate in May. I honestly don't think I'll ever feel right until I get back home. Washington is beautiful, but I need my family, and I need that red dirt under my feet. My husband is willing to go along, now we just need to start a company so there will be work there for us.

Anyway, I feel your pain.
post #66 of 87
My mom had an old friend who was Cherokee. He had jet black hair, kept in a braid that passed his waist. He was very tall, strong build, and the most pale white skin and shocking blue eyes you'd ever seen. He was very active in local NA organizations, had all kinds of artifacts in his house, wore traditional jewelry, etc... I never doubted that he was NA, but I could see how some might just because of the skin and eyes.
post #67 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mama Poot View Post
My mom had an old friend who was Cherokee. He had jet black hair, kept in a braid that passed his waist. He was very tall, strong build, and the most pale white skin and shocking blue eyes you'd ever seen. He was very active in local NA organizations, had all kinds of artifacts in his house, wore traditional jewelry, etc... I never doubted that he was NA, but I could see how some might just because of the skin and eyes.
I have had traditional jewelry (and my feather ) tore off my person. I don't wear it anymore.

ETA: Sorry. I'm a little bitter about some things.
In some fit of karma, later in life, I ran into the 2 girls who did this while my brothers and I were out at a bar. The 2 girls were absolutely drooling all over my twin brothers. My brothers asked if I knew who they were and I said "All I know about them is <this incident- wherein they told me I was "too white for those things">." My brothers exchanged a look and I ended up going home earlier than them. I found out later (from my 3rd brother) that they had had this girls over to the table after I left, etc and when the girls asked for their number, my brothers said "Oh, I'm sorry. Can't do it. You know that girl that was "too white" for Native things? That's my sister. We'd be too white for you."
post #68 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineR View Post
My brothers exchanged a look and I ended up going home earlier than them. I found out later (from my 3rd brother) that they had had this girls over to the table after I left, etc and when the girls asked for their number, my brothers said "Oh, I'm sorry. Can't do it. You know that girl that was "too white" for Native things? That's my sister. We'd be too white for you."
Sweet, sweet karma....

OT has anyone seen the Canadian commercials for Lakota (some sort of pain reliever), they changed the spokesperson from an elderly Native guy to this totally hot young one...wouldn't kick him out of bed for being 1/8 quantum!!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChntEB77-OU
post #69 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swan3 View Post
Sweet, sweet karma....

OT has anyone seen the Canadian commercials for Lakota (some sort of pain reliever), they changed the spokesperson from an elderly Native guy to this totally hot young one...wouldn't kick him out of bed for being 1/8 quantum!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChntEB77-OU
Too funny. It's actually kind of scary how much that guy looks like my twin brothers.
post #70 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineR View Post
Too funny. It's actually kind of scary how much that guy looks like my twin brothers.
When you mentioned the girls drooling, plus the many descriptions of beautiful native men in this discussion made me think of the commercial. SIGH. Pretty dreamy.

And if that guy looks like your brothers...no wonder they get ogled!
post #71 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swan3 View Post
When you mentioned the girls drooling, plus the many descriptions of beautiful native men in this discussion made me think of the commercial. SIGH. Pretty dreamy.

And if that guy looks like your brothers...no wonder they get ogled!
Yeah, I've heard it all my life. It's really sickening to be sitting with a group of your girlfriends, listening to them all drool about your brothers... and "Hey, can you come over?" being responded to with "Are your brothers home?"
post #72 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineR View Post
I have had traditional jewelry (and my feather ) tore off my person. I don't wear it anymore.

ETA: Sorry. I'm a little bitter about some things.
In some fit of karma, later in life, I ran into the 2 girls who did this while my brothers and I were out at a bar. The 2 girls were absolutely drooling all over my twin brothers. My brothers asked if I knew who they were and I said "All I know about them is <this incident- wherein they told me I was "too white for those things">." My brothers exchanged a look and I ended up going home earlier than them. I found out later (from my 3rd brother) that they had had this girls over to the table after I left, etc and when the girls asked for their number, my brothers said "Oh, I'm sorry. Can't do it. You know that girl that was "too white" for Native things? That's my sister. We'd be too white for you."
I'm really sorry that happened to you.
post #73 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by theretohere View Post
I'm really sorry that happened to you.
I both am and am not. It was a turning point in my life. It's the point at which I decided that I could continue to proudly define myself as Native and face the opposition or assimilate and truly become a white Indian. I decided that if I continued to define myself as Native, I had better get myself better acquainted with the true *issues* of being Native, since I don't have to deal with the discrimination in the general world which Natives who look Native do. My family did/does deal with that and I've *seen* it, but I had never understood any of it at all. I mean, we're all just people, right? I still don't really understand it, but I have a better grasp of how to deal with it. I still think people are just people.
I'm deeply proud of my heritage, so for me it was really kind of a no brainer. I *chose* not to wear my traditional jewelry (and especially my feather) because of the respect I have for the meaning of it- I don't want it to be disrespected like that *ever again*. I keep it someplace safe and carry it with me if I go to ceremonies and the like- I will not wear it until I am there and amongst "safe" people who know me- know that I know the meaning behind the pieces.
The thing that honestly made (and still makes) me the most angry about the incident is not that they tore things from my person... It's that they threw my feather on the ground and stomped it. I understand that they truly just didn't understand that I "belonged"- but for them to so disrespect an object which I was taught was to be venerated just made me .
post #74 of 87
Not NA, but don't line up with dh or my kids at a glance. Often been assumed to be a nanny.

Feel for who is asking and why --- things are evolving --- be open.
post #75 of 87
This is so true. Mom (according to the stuff she found she's Native American) was adopted by my white grandparents in 1952. We'll never know her real past because the records center burned down sometime in the 60's. My father was Irish/Welsh. At any rate.. I look like her, my sister took after my father's side with the ivory skin and strawberry blonde hair and everything on her is pert and perky (grumble) Fast forward to my #1 Son. My ex husband is Irish/Cherokee. We're both kind of medium skinned and have dark hair. DS1 has pale (really almost see-through) skin, green/... I can't say the other color is brown, more of a russet color, or red-brown eyes and flaming, neon red hair. Lucky draw from the genetic grab-bag, I guess. I've met red-haired, green eyed Black people, Asian people with freckles.. the list goes on. It takes more than a glance.
P.S. If you want some interesting reading, there was a study done to see exactly how humnas got to this continent. They can't pin it down. There's genetic markers for every race. I still say screw the land bridge, we were always here.
post #76 of 87
Again, OT, buy WHY is there a pain pill called Lakota? Grumble grumble. People think that Denali is just an SUV. Speaking of, what makes someone a Grand Cherokee? My mom's joke is that she's a Grand Cherokee because her grandma was a Cherokee. Get it?


That guy in the ad looked like a beefier version of my brother... though my brother has much curlier hair. And yeah, "competing" with girls in bars and stuff over your brother gets OLD. FAST. My brother's in a band, so it's really bad...
post #77 of 87
I just got the commercial to load... Yum! He can help me with my back pain any time.
post #78 of 87
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MommaFox View Post
This is so true. Mom (according to the stuff she found she's Native American) was adopted by my white grandparents in 1952. We'll never know her real past because the records center burned down sometime in the 60's.
Excuse me while I go on a little rant again here.
There was an amazingly large number of "records centers" which "burned down" in the 60s- or maybe it was just one. Either way, Native children born and adopted before then have a *very* difficult time getting answers because of these mysterious "fires".
In the 60s, Natives had just been declared actual people. As newly declared people with all the rights of people, they started demanding to know what had happened to the children which were apprehended from them (most often for no reason). Lo and behold, "we can't tell you. That records center burned down." :
post #79 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacquelineR View Post
Excuse me while I go on a little rant again here.
There was an amazingly large number of "records centers" which "burned down" in the 60s- or maybe it was just one. Either way, Native children born and adopted before then have a *very* difficult time getting answers because of these mysterious "fires".
In the 60s, Natives had just been declared actual people. As newly declared people with all the rights of people, they started demanding to know what had happened to the children which were apprehended from them (most often for no reason). Lo and behold, "we can't tell you. That records center burned down." :
We get ads in the paper all the time for people looking for relatives- and if there's any info- guesses at surnames it can be tracked through the tribe, sometimes. I'm glad that the ICWA has straightened that out some at least.
post #80 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by FormerlyKnownAs View Post
Again, OT, buy WHY is there a pain pill called Lakota? Grumble grumble. People think that Denali is just an SUV. Speaking of, what makes someone a Grand Cherokee? My mom's joke is that she's a Grand Cherokee because her grandma was a Cherokee. Get it?
:


Quote:
Originally Posted by FormerlyKnownAs View Post
That guy in the ad looked like a beefier version of my brother... though my brother has much curlier hair. And yeah, "competing" with girls in bars and stuff over your brother gets OLD. FAST. My brother's in a band, so it's really bad...
Oh man, double trouble! Never grew up with brothers so I have no idea what that's like!!!
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