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Doesn't this seem strange? - Page 2

post #21 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamaverdi View Post
An Auditory Processing Disorder is fairly common, but usually can't be tested for when they are little...they have to be older, much older, 7/8ish I think.

Don't quote me.

Auditory Processing is when your brain doesn't hear things in the right order, or interpret the sounds in the right way.

ABR would be a sedated test that measure's the brain's ability to actually "hear" the words, not translate them.

Auditory Processing is how it is translated.

There are different issues the ABR can pick up like Auditory Neuropathy.

ABR is somewhat like a NCS (Nerve Conduction Study) sometimes done with an EMG.


FWIU.
So are you saying it's probably not typical? I guess I just always want to stay on top of things with him and not miss something. Like an Auditory Processing Disorder or whatever. His therapists are not good at keeping up on what's going on unfortunately.
post #22 of 30
His therapists are through ECI?

No, it's probably not typical, but really, I don't know. My first one spoke around 6-8 months old. My second spoke at over 2 1/2 years old.
post #23 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamaverdi View Post
His therapists are through ECI?

No, it's probably not typical, but really, I don't know. My first one spoke around 6-8 months old. My second spoke at over 2 1/2 years old.
Yeah, he gets EI. And sadly we live in a pretty small town and only really have access to one group of therapists. And only one of them are very good.
post #24 of 30
Don't feel bad. I live in the 4th largest city in the US and still we have trouble finding good therapists who will take our insurance. Of course we have yoUrHorrendousCoverage for our insurance company. : (If only that were a joke.)



Has he had an ABR though? Or just an OAE?
post #25 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamaverdi View Post
Don't feel bad. I live in the 4th largest city in the US and still we have trouble finding good therapists who will take our insurance. Of course we have yoUrHorrendousCoverage for our insurance company. : (If only that were a joke.)



Has he had an ABR though? Or just an OAE?
He's never had an ABR. Just your standard hearing test. I don't know, they put a thingy in his ear and measured the sound waves I think. lmao And then put him in a small room and watched if he turned towards sounds. An ABR does sound like it would be beneficial because with his encephalopathy it wouldn't be far fetched to think there could be something going on.
post #26 of 30
The thing in the ear is OAE.
post #27 of 30
He's only 22 months, right?

I would definitely keep an eye on it, but I wouldn't be too alarmed. I had one daughter who definitely acquired expressive language late (her receptive language was fine because she could follow a command like "go get the ball"). She had maybe 15 words by 24 months. In comparison, her two older sisters both spoke quite clearly by 18 months a whole variety of words, and by 2 were speaking in 3-4 word sentences. Now matter how I tried to have that dd repeat words, she just looked at me and wouldn't repeat much. Some word/sounds like "moo", but not other words like "ball".

I started to get alarmed by age 24 months and called EI to have her evaluated. It took about a month for them to come out, but in the weeks following the phone call, she kept adding more and more words, so that by the time they actually came out, she gained maybe another 10 or so. Then they tested her, but she missed the qualification cutoff by about a two or three points. In the month following, she gained even more words.

I was told or I read somewhere that once a child reaches about 50 words, there suddenly becomes a word explosion. So your child may be coming to that point in the next few months.

Now all that being said, my daughter still struggles with enunciation (says words like yawyer, instead of lawyer) so she probably will end up having speech therapy at some point, but she is working hard on it now.

However, now she loves to sing and will sing constantly in the car to the childrens songs. I am tickled pink with how much she loves to sing now when this time last year I was really worried about her not speaking much.
post #28 of 30
My dd did this as well, and it actually got her mislabeled as PDD at first instead of epileptic with an auditory processing disorder. At three and a half, we've just in the past month got her to a point where she can have conversations (thank you tegretol!!). She's been able to technically speak for awhile, I'd say maybe 2 .5? But I guess it was just too hard to get the words out. She still has some processing issues, and will often say words that ryhme, or wrong words. However, the girl LOVES to sing. OMG, before she goes to bed every.single.night. the whole family has to come lay in the bed with her and we all sing skinamarinky-dinky-dink at the top of our lungs. As soon as it's over, she's out like a light. Yes, she's a character.

Anyway, around 20 months or so she would start singing, singing, singing, although we'd have no idea what she was singing. We later figured out it was bits of television shows - hence the PDD suspicions.

I wouldn't downplay the effect that epilepsy can have on speech and language usage. Like I said, with dd there were all kinds of suspicions about what was going on, when in truth, it was just that her seizures weren't well controlled - add that to a cognitive roadblocker like keppra and what was happening was that she *really* wanted to speak, I think, but just couldn't because of the mind fog she was in.
post #29 of 30
I don't want to worry you but your DS sounds like my DD was - and she has APD.

She was not a late talker but when she was first learning to speak it was weird and I remember thinking "is this how all kids learn language?" because she was sort of doing the sing-songy thing and imitating the cadence of speech rather than individual words. She seemed to be trying to say/sing the whole phrase.

It has always been easier for her to learn language through song than regular spoken words.

I think the key here for you is think about how much your DS actually understands. Can he follow a one-step direction without you pointing? Can he understand some individual words without pantomiming? If so, you probably can relax a bit and wait for things to develop more (one friend I know had a son who didn't have anything approaching real speech until just before he was 3 - but it was clear he understood what was being said).

It was clear my DD wasn't understanding alot of what was being said. And she was better able to "pay attention" to musical speech rather than regular speech...personally I think it actually fits with her sensory seeking personality - she just needs more "input" to make sense of things....

hth
peace,
robyn
post #30 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hippymomma69 View Post
I think the key here for you is think about how much your DS actually understands. Can he follow a one-step direction without you pointing? Can he understand some individual words without pantomiming?
No. He can't follow directions without a lot of pointing or gesturing. And it has to be repeated quite a few times typically. He does understand some words.

I'm not concerned about his speech really since I know he has a speech delay. I'm mostly wondering if there's anything atypical as far as language goes in being able to "sing" before talking.

I do think he fits A LOT of the characteristics of APD but he's still very young. He is a sensory seeker as well and that wouldn't surprise me if it played a part!
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