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July 2008 Book Challenge - Page 8

post #141 of 196
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellemarie View Post
My husband doesn't even know how much he's looking forward to this book.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeta View Post
Mine either!!!
Me either :
post #142 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellemarie View Post

My husband doesn't even know how much he's looking forward to this book.

That is all.


LMAO...........

On second thought, maybe I should read it..........
post #143 of 196
Thread Starter 
We'll actually be in California for my sister's wedding when Breaking Dawn comes out and have already made plans to pick it up for the plane ride home!
post #144 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
I don't really get why some of the reviews on Amazon and elsewhere call Bella a whiney brat - she does great in school, cleans the house without being asked, cooks dinner for her father every single night, likes to spend her free time reading/visiting bookstores, and did something pretty brave and selfless for her mother at the end of the story. She sounds like she would make a pretty good kid in real life.
I thought she got whiney in the later books, but as has been mentioned already, the sexual tension kept me reading them all. :

Do you think we'll get what we're after in the 4th book? I sure hope so!
post #145 of 196
#24: The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan
This book was fascinating! I would love for everyone to read it who cares at all what they eat. I've especially been thinking a lot about how we in the US have no food culture. We always read about people in Japan, Italy, France and Greece and how they eat, then we try to adapt our diets to theirs without much success. Thing is, food is such a part of their cultures that they know what and how much to eat of whichever food and I'm sure their lifestyles have a lot to do with their longetivity and health. Living in Japan and seeing how traditional Japanese people eat is fascinating. I love Pollan's style of writing. . .who would have thought mushrooms could be so interesting (and I'm not just talking about the fun ones).

2008 Book Challenge: #1. Tuesdays with Morrie (Albom); #2. Searching for the Sound My life with the Grateful Dead (Lesh); #3. Fastfood Nation (Schlosser); #4. Along Came a Spider (Patterson) #5. Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood (Wells); #6. The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) #7. The Poisonwood Bible (Kingsolver); #8. Twilight (Meyer); #9. New Moon (Meyer); #10. Eclipse (Meyer); #11. Eat, Pray, Love (Gilbert); #12. The Golden Compass (Pullman); #13: The Subtle Knife (Pullman); #14: The Amber Spyglass (Pullman); #15: Outlander (Galbadon); #16: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Brashares); #17: Where are you now? (Clarke); #18: The Appeal (Grisham); #19: The Host (Meyer); #20: Summer Time (Rigbey); #21: The Fifth Vial (Palmer); #22: The Other Boelyn Girl (Gregory); #23: Goodbye, Vietnam (Whelen)
post #146 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellemarie View Post
AHHHHHHHHHHH! How can you skip 700 pages of more gripping sexual tension?!

:

My husband doesn't even know how much he's looking forward to this book.

That is all.
: I'm right there with you. . .shhhh. . .
post #147 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
We'll actually be in California for my sister's wedding when Breaking Dawn comes out and have already made plans to pick it up for the plane ride home!
After all the talk of everyone's spouses unknowingly looking forward to this book coming out, I have a very different picture of your plane ride than I'm probably supposed to have.....
post #148 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
After all the talk of everyone's spouses unknowingly looking forward to this book coming out, I have a very different picture of your plane ride than I'm probably supposed to have.....
post #149 of 196
#43 The Diaper-Free Baby: The Natural Toilet Training Alternative by Christine Gross-Loh

Out of all the EC books out there, I chose to read this one because it sounded like a more laidback approach. It was, and I'm glad for that. My main hesitation to EC was the idea that I'd have to watch my daughter like a hawk 24-7 to catch every elimination. So it was refreshing to read about examples of parents who successfully practice EC only some of the time. The book is organized by age of the child, so there's some repetition, but I didn't mind the reinforcement of the concepts. You could read just the part that applies to your child's age, which is a nice option to have.

If you're interested in EC, this book is a good place to start.
post #150 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by snozzberry View Post
I thought she got whiney in the later books, but as has been mentioned already, the sexual tension kept me reading them all. :
See, I just didn't pick up on any sexual tension. Maybe I was icked out by the thought of kissing someone so cold and stone-like? I dunno. But my sexual tension-o-meter stayed way below "Warm" for both books.
post #151 of 196
"Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules" (sequel to first diary) by Jeff Kinney

This was just as fun and funny as the first diary. Lots of cartoons and funny stuff - but more focused on his family relationships than school relationships this time.
post #152 of 196
27. Kiln People - David Brin
This was a GREAT book. Fans of Snow Crash or Richard Morgan's Altered Carbon would love this, too. Albert is a private investigator in a world where "dittoing" - making copies of yourself - makes the world turn. Instead of working, people make copies of themselves (different color golems = different skills and different prices) to do their work for them - a green to wash your toilets and run errands, an ebony to do very detail oriented tasks, etc. War is run much like a football game, only with even more expendable players.

Good ole Albert gets caught up in a twisted game of betrayal and technological advancement when he's hired to investigate the apparent murder of a scientist involved with dittoing technology. What a whirlwind! A great SF-noir book, with clever puns and just the right kind of irreverence. Highly recommended!
post #153 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeta View Post
27. Kiln People - David Brin
This was a GREAT book. Fans of Snow Crash or Richard Morgan's Altered Carbon would love this, too. Albert is a private investigator in a world where "dittoing" - making copies of yourself - makes the world turn. Instead of working, people make copies of themselves (different color golems = different skills and different prices) to do their work for them - a green to wash your toilets and run errands, an ebony to do very detail oriented tasks, etc. War is run much like a football game, only with even more expendable players.

Good ole Albert gets caught up in a twisted game of betrayal and technological advancement when he's hired to investigate the apparent murder of a scientist involved with dittoing technology. What a whirlwind! A great SF-noir book, with clever puns and just the right kind of irreverence. Highly recommended!
Oooh, sounds like fun! I loved Snow Crash
post #154 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeta View Post
27. Kiln People - David Brin
This was a GREAT book. Fans of Snow Crash or Richard Morgan's Altered Carbon would love this, too. Albert is a private investigator in a world where "dittoing" - making copies of yourself - makes the world turn. Instead of working, people make copies of themselves (different color golems = different skills and different prices) to do their work for them - a green to wash your toilets and run errands, an ebony to do very detail oriented tasks, etc. War is run much like a football game, only with even more expendable players.

Good ole Albert gets caught up in a twisted game of betrayal and technological advancement when he's hired to investigate the apparent murder of a scientist involved with dittoing technology. What a whirlwind! A great SF-noir book, with clever puns and just the right kind of irreverence. Highly recommended!
Thanks does sound cool - I'm going to request it from the library. I haven't heard of the other two; I'll have to check them out as well.
post #155 of 196
#25 A Playdate with Death, Ayelet Waldman

Quote:
Juliet Applebaum, lawyer turned full-time mother, seems to have a talent for encountering murder. In her third case, she arrives at the gym for a session with her personal trainer only to find that he is dead. Ever ambivalent about her decision to stop working outside the home, she agrees to investigate when the police write the death off as a suicide...Waldman's deft portrayal of Los Angeles's upper crust and of the dilemma facing women who want it all will make it possible for readers to forgive a rather flimsy plot.
The third in Waldman's series of mommy-track mysteries. As the first two, it's an enjoyable light read. The mysteries are interesting, and Juliet's mommy experience very much resonates with me.


#1-Garden of Beasts, #2-Passporter Guide to WDW, #3-Skylight Confessions, #4 - The Secret, #5 - The Kite Runner, #6 - Gone, #7 - Hidden Mickeys, #8 - Into Thin Air, #9 - Wolf Point, #10 - Ocean Breezes, #11 - Harmony Guide to Cables and Aran, #12 - East, #13 - Getting Started Knitting Socks, #14 - Keeping Faith, #15 - The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight, #16 The Big Nap, #17 - Grave of God's Daughter, #18 - Daddy's Girl, #19 - Behind the Scenes at the Museum, #20 - America, #21 - The Little Friend, #22 - Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid, #23 - Candyfreak, #24 - Devil in the White City, #25 A Playdate with Death
post #156 of 196
Bringing Down the House by Ben Mezrich

I really enjoyed this and found the whole "card counting" process fascinating. Made me want to go gambling, though.
post #157 of 196
The Teahouse Fire by Ellis Avery

A young orphan is taken by her priest uncle to Japan in the mid-1800s. She escapes him when a fire breaks out and takes residence with a Japanese family. The family teaches the art of the tea ceremony. Extensive description of tea ceremonies that lost me at times but were very beautiful.

Lately, I have not enjoyed the books I am reading. This is another one -- it was good but not good enough to hold my interest the whole way.
post #158 of 196
28. Feast of Fools - Rachel Caine - YA, Supernatural

This was a pretty good installment of the Morganville Vampires series. Short, filled with action and a wee bit of sexual tension, and the characters are well-drawn. The main character, Claire, is especially well done - a very smart teenage girl, yet still vulnerable to her teenager-ness.

My only beef is Caine's propensity for ending in cliff-hangers. Not total, oh-no-she-didn't cliffhangers, but definitely not wrapped up in a neat bow - they always leave the door wide open for the next installment. Which would be fun, if I didn't have to wait a few years for the next one!

Fans of the Twilight series might enjoy this slightly lighter and waaaaay less epic series. I would liken Twilight to a movie, where this series is more like a TV-show, a la Buffy the Vampire Slayer or something. Fun and entertaining, not too much commitment.
post #159 of 196
add me to the list of Twilight readers...
for me the sexual tension bit was up and down. it was believable, then bella would talk about how cold and marblelike edward was, and she'd lose me. but i'm a devoted fan of both "Buffy" and "Angel" tv series :, so i was already sold on the forbidden vampire-human romance.

i have to agree with previous posters that if i heard about his perfect face one more time i'd:Puke (is all the talk about "perfect" supposed to universalize edward? so we can all fall for own idea of a handsome pale man?)

my other big objection is the stalking. to say that's a turn off would be an understatement.

i think i'm reading new moon next :
post #160 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeta View Post
28. Feast of Fools - Rachel Caine - YA, Supernatural

This was a pretty good installment of the Morganville Vampires series. Short, filled with action and a wee bit of sexual tension, and the characters are well-drawn. The main character, Claire, is especially well done - a very smart teenage girl, yet still vulnerable to her teenager-ness.

My only beef is Caine's propensity for ending in cliff-hangers. Not total, oh-no-she-didn't cliffhangers, but definitely not wrapped up in a neat bow - they always leave the door wide open for the next installment. Which would be fun, if I didn't have to wait a few years for the next one!

Fans of the Twilight series might enjoy this slightly lighter and waaaaay less epic series. I would liken Twilight to a movie, where this series is more like a TV-show, a la Buffy the Vampire Slayer or something. Fun and entertaining, not too much commitment.
Is this series clean enough for an 11-year old? I know a kid who has a really high reading level who loves vampire novels and needs recommendations.
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