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July 2008 Book Challenge - Page 3

post #41 of 196
#14 Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder

Why did I not read these books when I was young? I remember watching the show, but don't know why I didn't come across the books back then. Really good info on how they lived back then. I'm big on homesteading and this was a great look at how they did a lot of things. Very cool read.:
post #42 of 196
#23: Goodbye, Vietnam by Gloria Whelan
A family learns that the grandma is going to be arrested for practicing alternative medicine and midwifery so they flee Vietnam. This is a story about their journey out of Vietnam on a very tiny, overcrowded boat. DH asked me to read this book since his students are supposed to read it for summer school. It is about 5th grade level and only took about an hour to read. It was interesting, but didn't really grab my attention. I didn't find the writing to be descriptive enough and didn't really identify with any of the characters. Now, I'm back to The Omnivore's Dilemma by Pollan and totally enjoying it so far. . .I'm about half done and will post as soon as I finish it! Right now I'm having a calling to become an above organic grass farmer::

2008 Book Challenge: #1. Tuesdays with Morrie (Albom); #2. Searching for the Sound My life with the Grateful Dead (Lesh); #3. Fastfood Nation (Schlosser); #4. Along Came a Spider (Patterson) #5. Divine Secrets of the YaYa Sisterhood (Wells); #6. The Thirteenth Tale (Setterfield) #7. The Poisonwood Bible (Kingsolver); #8. Twilight (Meyer); #9. New Moon (Meyer); #10. Eclipse (Meyer); #11. Eat, Pray, Love (Gilbert); #12. The Golden Compass (Pullman); #13: The Subtle Knife (Pullman); #14: The Amber Spyglass (Pullman); #15: Outlander (Galbadon); #16: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants (Brashares); #17: Where are you now? (Clarke); #18: The Appeal (Grisham); #19: The Host (Meyer); #20: Summer Time (Rigbey); #21: The Fifth Vial (Palmer); #22: The Other Boelyn Girl (Gregory)
post #43 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
So far:


And that's all I've decided on so far, I'm sure there will be a few more. Speaking of which, I need to see when the GREs are scheduled ... better go.
Did you pick a date for the GRE?
What program are you doing? MFA?
Notre Dame is pretty close to where I'm from in Indiana.
post #44 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
I'll have to see if our libraries have it ... when I'm done with the massive list I've gotten already

Speaking of the "many worlds" theory have you read Clifford D. Simak's Ring Around the Sun, that's one of the best "many worlds" books I've ever run across.
bummer, I went to put it on hold and remembered that I'm at my hold limit at the library. we're not normal, you know.
Guess I'll have to put on my list of "books to put on hold after I pick up the holds that are waiting" list. (i'm not joking)
post #45 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
I have been to Buxton. It was part of a journalism training program in high school.
that's cool -- did you grow up in canada or was it a big trip?
post #46 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by BurtsGirl View Post
25) The Sugar Queen by Sarah Addison Allen
WOW! I loved her debut book, Garden Spells, and I wasn't disappointed in her second book. It was just a wonderful read and it totally drew me in to the magical life of the characters. Allen is now one of my favorite authors!

Oh, I just realized I hit my yearly goal! My goal was 25 books this year and I've hit it in July! Woot! Trying for 50 books now!
Ooh, I loved Garden Spells, too. I'll have to remember that this one is out.....

And congratulations on already reaching your goal!
post #47 of 196
Okay, time to stop multi-posting, post my books, go and read to dd and then do dishes.

#85 The Finer Points of Sausage Dogs by Alexander McCall Smith
the middle book in the little trilogy by the author of the No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency. Very short. Funny, especially if you know at all about the world of academia (or care enough to imagine). I liked this one better than the first. There were several parts I read aloud to DH.

#86 Dear American Airlines by Jonathan Miles
Another fairly short one. Author's first novel, I believe. Bennie Ford (53 years old) is on the way to his estranged daughter's commitment ceremony when his flight is delayed and he is stuck at O'Hare. An angry letter to the airline turns into a recitation of his life story interspersed with excerpts of the novel Ford is translating from the original Polish. Interesting....
post #48 of 196
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
Did you pick a date for the GRE?
What program are you doing? MFA?
Notre Dame is pretty close to where I'm from in Indiana.
Looking at the GRE dates vs. the deadline dates for applications, I won't need to take the GRE until Sept/Oct.

As for the program, I am wanting my MA in Literature with the intention of going on to get my PhD in Literature with an emphasis/focus on Contemporary American Lit and Literary Critical Theory ... with the end result, hopefully, of obtaining a professorship in an English Department somewhere (preferably on the west coast).
post #49 of 196
Thread Starter 
#77 Marvel 1602
by Neil Gaiman
illustrated by Andy Kubert

My review of Marvel 1602 can be found HERE.

#1 The Time Machine, #2 The Shining (Audio): Redux, #3 Curious George, #4 Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, #5 The Tragedy of Othello, Moor of Venice (Bantam Anthology), #6 A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four, #7 "A Study in Emerald", #8 The Zombie Survival Guide: Complete Protection from the Living Dead, #9 Fantastic Beasts & Where to Find Them, #10 Quidditch Through the Ages, #11 On the Day You Were Born, #12 The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (Bantam Anthology), #13 The Man Who Was Thursday: A Nightmare, #14 Rubyfruit Jungle, #15 John, Paul, George & Ben, #16 The Merchant of Venice (Bantam Anthology): Redux, #17 Dinotopia: A Land Apart from Time, #18 Trent's Last Case, #19 Cyrano de Bergerac: A Heroic Comedy in Five Acts, #20 Animal Dads, #21 Faggots, #22 A Day with Wilbur Robinson, #23 And Then There Were None, #24 Eating Between the Lines: The Supermarket Shopper's Guide to the Truth Behind Food Labels, #25 Henry IV, Part One, #26 Zami, A New Spelling of My Name: A Biomythography, #27 Twelfth Night, or What You Will (Bantam Anthology), #28 Murder Must Advertise, #29 Stagestruck: Theater, AIDS, and the Marketing of Gay America, #30 Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part One: Millennium Approaches, #31 The Tragedy of Macbeth (Bantam Anthology), #32 Stone of Destiny: The Story of Lady Macbeth, #33 Ian Pollack's Illustrated King Lear #34 Celtic Folklore Cooking, #35 Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes, Part Two: Perestroika Revised Edition), #36 The Winter's Tale (Bantam Anthology), #37 Tolkien's Art: A Mythology for England, #38 The Body (Audio), #39 Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption (Audio), #40 Four Past Midnight: The Sun Dog (Audio), #41 The Tempest (Bantam Anthology): Redux, #42 World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, #43 Science Verse, #44 Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich and Other Stories You’re Sure to Like Because They’re All About Monsters and Some of Them are Also About Food. You Like Food, Don’t You? Well, All Right Then, #45 Case Histories, #46 Time Bandit: Two Brothers, the Bering Sea, and One of the World's Deadliest Jobs, #47 Why Pandas Do Handstands and Other Curious Truths About Animals, #48 Rolling the R's, #49 Spooky ABC, #50 A is for Arches: A Utah Alphabet, #51 Raven: A Trickster Tale from the Pacific Northwest, #52 E is for Evergreen: A Washington Alphabet, #53 Beowulf (Longman Anthology), #54-60 The Harry Potter Series (Audio), #60 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Audio), #61 The Gingerbread Girl (Audio), #62 A Whale Hunt: Two Years on the Olympic Peninsula with the Makah and Their Canoe, #63 Heart-Shaped Box (Audio), #64 The Host, #65 Why War is Never a Good Idea, #66 Spicy Hot Colors: Colores Picantes, #67 To Everything There is a Season, #68 Charles Fort: The Man Who Invented the Supernatural, #69 Stick: Great Moments in Art, History, Film, and More..., #70 America: A Patriotic Primer, #71 A is for America: An American Alphabet, #72 Just How Stupid Are We?: The TRUTH About the American Voter, #73 Teaching Montessori in the Home: The Pre-School Years, #74 S is for Shamrock: An Ireland Alphabet, #75 The Brief History of the Dead, #76 The Ruins, #77 Marvel 1602
post #50 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
that's cool -- did you grow up in canada or was it a big trip?
I grew up in Detroit. I don't remember it being a long drive to Buxton from there.
post #51 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
bummer, I went to put it on hold and remembered that I'm at my hold limit at the library. we're not normal, you know.
Guess I'll have to put on my list of "books to put on hold after I pick up the holds that are waiting" list. (i'm not joking)
I hate it when this happens! Now I add titles to my "to-read" shelf on Goodreads so I can keep track of what I need to later request from the library. I used to write things down on a piece of paper but inevitably it would disappear.
post #52 of 196
Just finished The Audacity of Hope a few days ago. I had been slogging through it for awhile, not because I didn't find it engaging or interesting (I did) but I have gotten into this bad habit lately of reading more than one thing at a time. It wouldn't be so bad if I just had two books I was reading at once, but now it seems to be three or four. I need to stop this bad habit.

Anyway, I did like The Audacity. I am a huge Obama supporter so no surprise there. In some ways it was very much a book on politics, history, economics, and sociology as it pertains to America, but at least for me, I feel like I really came away with a sense of who he is, where he is coming from, and what he stands for. (For people who "don't know who he is" -- they should read this!) What I was most struck by is his ability to see things (especially anything controversial) from different points of views and angles, at least that is very much how he portrayed himself in his book. We'll see how that plays out when he is POTUS.
post #53 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
Looking at the GRE dates vs. the deadline dates for applications, I won't need to take the GRE until Sept/Oct.

As for the program, I am wanting my MA in Literature with the intention of going on to get my PhD in Literature with an emphasis/focus on Contemporary American Lit and Literary Critical Theory ... with the end result, hopefully, of obtaining a professorship in an English Department somewhere (preferably on the west coast).
That sounds awesome. I'll be paying attention as it all develops!
post #54 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
I grew up in Detroit. I don't remember it being a long drive to Buxton from there.
That's right -- they mentioned Michigan in the book several times.
post #55 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by OMama View Post
I hate it when this happens! Now I add titles to my "to-read" shelf on Goodreads so I can keep track of what I need to later request from the library. I used to write things down on a piece of paper but inevitably it would disappear.
I have a Word document on my desktop that I add to. The problem is that once it goes on there, it takes a while to put into the library system, since meanwhile as space appears in my library account it is filled with more recent recommendations....I'm so silly.
post #56 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
I have a Word document on my desktop that I add to. The problem is that once it goes on there, it takes a while to put into the library system, since meanwhile as space appears in my library account it is filled with more recent recommendations....I'm so silly.
I do this too


60. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Loved this one. It painted a very vivid picture of what life must have been like in the early 1900's and how people were affected by war, technology, race, religion, and poverty. The author grew up during that time so it seemed even more authentic to me.
post #57 of 196
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn was a favorite of mine when I was younger. I should re-read it.

#5. Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books by Azar Nafisi
A former professor at a university in Tehran invites seven of her best female students to attend a weekly study of Western literature in her home - books now banned under the regime. I learned more about the novels they read then I did in any of my Literature classes. But even more interesting was the daily struggle of the women living under an oppressive rule.
post #58 of 196
I'm back! Didn't get much reading done on the trip but the ones I read were all great and I highly recommend them.

"One Good Turn" by Kate Atkinson

This is similar in format and style to her excellent book "Case Histories" and I liked it just as much. It starts with random characters who all witness a road rage accident and as we learn their stories, they all eventually become connected. She is becoming one of my favorite writers . . .

"The Phantom Tollbooth" by Norton Juster

I got this as a end of school year present for my daughter and picked it up on the plane ride home when I finished my book. I remembered loving it as a kid but had forgotten what it was all about. Man - it is just so clever and good. For those who haven't read it - a boy who doesn't see the purpose of education and is perpetually bored, gets the present of a tollbooth - when he goes through he ends up in Dictionopolis - the land of words and DIgitopolis - the land of numbers and has to rescue the Princesses Rhyme and Reason to restore the land of Wisdom.

"Girls of Riyadh" by Rajaa Alsanea

I picked this one up at one of the airports when I finished the previous with still two flights to go. A Saudi Arabian young women sends out weekly emails (similar to blog posts) about the secret life of four young upper-class women in Saudi Arabia. Really good.
post #59 of 196
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OMama View Post
Just finished The Audacity of Hope a few days ago. I had been slogging through it for awhile, not because I didn't find it engaging or interesting (I did) but I have gotten into this bad habit lately of reading more than one thing at a time. It wouldn't be so bad if I just had two books I was reading at once, but now it seems to be three or four. I need to stop this bad habit.

Anyway, I did like The Audacity. I am a huge Obama supporter so no surprise there. In some ways it was very much a book on politics, history, economics, and sociology as it pertains to America, but at least for me, I feel like I really came away with a sense of who he is, where he is coming from, and what he stands for. (For people who "don't know who he is" -- they should read this!) What I was most struck by is his ability to see things (especially anything controversial) from different points of views and angles, at least that is very much how he portrayed himself in his book. We'll see how that plays out when he is POTUS.
I need to read that ... we're an abberation here in Utah (as with most of our AP play group), Mormon Democrats who support Obama and despise Mitt Romney I'm surprised we haven't been kicked out of the state yet
post #60 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bufomander View Post
I have a Word document on my desktop that I add to. The problem is that once it goes on there, it takes a while to put into the library system, since meanwhile as space appears in my library account it is filled with more recent recommendations....I'm so silly.
Me too!

Only I have a spreadsheet so I can sort by genre.
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