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July 2008 Book Challenge - Page 5

post #81 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellemarie View Post
I took a break because I got The Preservationist by David Maine through interlibrary loan and wanted to get that read so I can return it on time. So far, it's totally worth paying to get from another library.
Dang, you have to pay for interlibrary loans? Bummer!

Bufomander, I hope everything went well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
62. The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall
This was really cute. Loved that Batty.
I loved that one too!
post #82 of 196
"All of a Kind Family" by Sydney Taylor

This was for our mother-daughter book club. Sweet book about poor, Jewish family with 5 daughters living in NY during the early 1900's. Sort of Little Womenish but way milder and younger.
post #83 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by snozzberry View Post
Dang, you have to pay for interlibrary loans? Bummer!
It is kind of a bummer. We pay postage for books borrowed from libraries inside our consortium, and postage plus an additional $2.50 for libraries outside. Typical postage is around $2.30.

The library will buy almost anything requested, though. That's a good thing since our closest bookstore is 45 minutes away. A "big name" bookstore is more than an hour away. It's frustrating.
post #84 of 196
13. Baker's Apprentice by Judith Ryan Hendricks. I'm almost done with it. So far I would describe it as charming and romantic. I liked her earlier books, especially Isabel's Daughter, so I had to read this. Baker's Apprentice is a sequel to her earlier story, Bread Alone.
post #85 of 196
"A Great and Terrible Beauty" by Libba Bray

The first part of a trilogy (it has been discussed before so I will briefly summarize). Teen girl's mother is murdered in India. She is sent to boarding school where she soon discovers she has magical abilities.

I enjoyed it much more than my description sounds. It is a teen fiction book but I already placed a hold for the next one.
post #86 of 196
"A Version of the Truth" by Jenneifer Kaufman and Karen Mack

About a women who tries to reinvent herself after her husband dies - lies on her resume and gets a job at a university. Light and fun.
post #87 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
"A Great and Terrible Beauty" by Libba Bray

Part of a trilogy that has been discussed before. Teen girl's mother is murdered in India. She is sent to boarding school where she soon discovers she has magical abilities. I enjoyed it much more than my description sounds. I already placed a hold for the next one.
Sounds intriguing. Just to clarify, this one is the first in the trilogy, right?
post #88 of 196
Yes, it was sorry. I wrote the description right before I took a nap so I was rushing.
post #89 of 196
63. The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue

This is about a young boy kidnapped by hobgobblins. He becomes one of the hobgobblins and lives in the forest with them and slowly forgets his true identity. He is replaced by a changeling and the book goes back and forth, following the kidnapped boy and the changeling who replaced him.

Anyone who enjoyed The Book of Lost Things would like this one.
post #90 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
63. The Stolen Child by Keith Donohue

This is about a young boy kidnapped by hobgobblins. He becomes one of the hobgobblins and lives in the forest with them and slowly forgets his true identity. He is replaced by a changeling and the book goes back and forth, following the kidnapped boy and the changeling who replaced him.

Anyone who enjoyed The Book of Lost Things would like this one.
I loved The Book of Lost Things and thought I had this on my to-read list - thanks for the reminder!

#29 A Great and Terrible Beauty (audio) – Interesting enough story but I thought the author was a little too verbose at times, like she was trying to hard. I thought the actor reading did a great job with the voices.

#30 The Fluoride Deception – This book isn’t exactly what I was expecting as it was mostly about fluoride in industry and how the dangers have been covered up for so long. It definitely did help me with my decision of whether or not to let my children use fluoridated toothpaste etc. Not worth the risk, imo.

Yippee! I met my goal. Thirty may not seem like a lot to some of you, but it is phenomenal for me. When I set the goal, I was dubious that I could do it, and now here it is only July and I did it! Whew, now the pressure is off and I can read Dragonfly in Amber. :LOL
post #91 of 196
Just finished The Rossetti Letter by Christi Phillips. It was okay. I read it for my book club. It was a bit predictable and contrived. But still an okay read. Nice and easy read for the summer. There are other similar books I have read that I enjoyed more, like In the Company of the Courtesan by Sarah Dunant and The Floating Book by Michelle Lovric. I think that half of the women in my BC will have liked it, and the other half not so much.
post #92 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenifer76 View Post
Yes, it was sorry. I wrote the description right before I took a nap so I was rushing.
No problem! Thanks for the clarification.
post #93 of 196
No problem. It looks like the second book in the series is being shipped to my library so hopefully I get it ASAP.
post #94 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by friendtoall View Post

#30 The Fluoride Deception – This book isn’t exactly what I was expecting as it was mostly about fluoride in industry and how the dangers have been covered up for so long. It definitely did help me with my decision of whether or not to let my children use fluoridated toothpaste etc. Not worth the risk, imo.
This sounds like something I should read. I have fluorosis in my teeth (white spots) due to the fluoride content in the water being so high in New Mexico where I grew up. My sister had a baby and she was given a pamphlet warning new parents that the local water supply had 5x the recommended amount of fluoride. I worked at a daycare where one of the infants had fluoride drops mixed into her baby food everyday - their pediatrician's bright idea. I also read recently that green tea has a very high amount of fluoride and I love green tea so now I am trying to avoid it. Isn't it true that fluoride isn't even supposed to be in our bodies at all - that it is just replacing iodine? It's a lot of stuff to think about.
post #95 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
This sounds like something I should read. I have fluorosis in my teeth (white spots) due to the fluoride content in the water being so high in New Mexico where I grew up. My sister had a baby and she was given a pamphlet warning new parents that the local water supply had 5x the recommended amount of fluoride. I worked at a daycare where one of the infants had fluoride drops mixed into her baby food everyday - their pediatrician's bright idea. I also read recently that green tea has a very high amount of fluoride and I love green tea so now I am trying to avoid it. Isn't it true that fluoride isn't even supposed to be in our bodies at all - that it is just replacing iodine? It's a lot of stuff to think about.
The book said that fluoride stays in the body so levels build up over time with exposure. "Safe" levels don't seem to be based on anything scientific and don't presume a lifetime of exposure. The source of fluoride added to drinking water is industrial waste! Like one researcher said, and I paraphrase because the book is already back at the library, It's not okay to spill fluoride into lakes or streams, it's not okay to gas fluoride into the atmosphere, but it is okay to put it in our drinking water?
post #96 of 196
#11 - The Snoring Bird - Bernd Heinrich

The back cover calls it "the remarkable story of his father's life, his family's past, and how the forces of history and nature shaped his own life." I loved it. I've really enjoyed the other Bernd Heinrich books I've read, about his research on ravens, and the Maine woods. He does a great job of reminding you how rich and fascinating the natural world is, and how much there is to be curious about. The story would have been interesting even if he were a random person I'd never heard of - his father's adventures and multiple women, and how the family (Germans living in Poland) managed to escape just in time at the end of World War II to what would become western Germany, lived for years in a little cabin in the forest, and eventually emigrated to the US. But it was even more interesting because Heinrich was someone I already "knew" and admired from his other books.
post #97 of 196
#22 The Turtle Catcher by Nicole Lea Helget I got this book after reading her first book, which i LOVED. This one was also really good, it was about a rural Minnesota town that had a lot of German immigrants during WWI. One strand of the story dealt with the war and conflicts of the townspeople. Another strand dealt with this odd romantic relationship between a retarded man and a hermaphrodite that starts the book with her brothers murdering him for what they think is a rape. It was odd and interesting, BUT here is what got me...I got this book from ILL and it came from the University of MN where the author was/is a student and it was written and bound as her thesis. My understanding now is that it will be published next year. I kinda felt like I had a sneak peak at the literary future, but it still had a lot of grammar mistakes and typos.

#23 The Yummy Mummy Manifesto by Anna JohnsonI hears the author interviewed on the radio and I thought this sounded like a fun book. I WAS WRONG! Don't waste your time. This book is nothing but a new moms observations on motherhood and they weren't anything profound. I also think for someone in her same situation the book is too long and wordy to be enjoyable.
post #98 of 196
Quote:
Originally Posted by chellemarie View Post
I'm going to my library today to request Fallen by Maine.
I thought it was funny how when the family met the shipbuilders wife they all thought she was a ghost because she was white.
I requested the Samson one, too.
post #99 of 196
21. Every Last Cuckoo by Kate Maloy
the main character in this book is Sarah, in her 70s. her husband dies and she is amazed to see herself building a new life. there was a large cast of characters (family, and she takes in boarders), which i feared would be unwieldy. she is a strong and passionate character, and that made the book feel countercultural to me--we don't often get an intimate look at the lives of older people. there was even some intimacy between husband and wife; again, rarely portrayed in my experience.
post #100 of 196
64. The Call of the Wild by Jack London
This book smelled so good - everyone needs to go to their library right now, find the oldest copy of Call of the Wild they have and just inhale. ahhhhh... old book smell.
65. The Coffee Trader by David Liss
This one was a really good read, suspenseful, although it seemed like he got tired of writing and just dashed off the ending.
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