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Cooking from scratch tribe, the original thread, come chat, save and/or learn! - Page 3

post #41 of 384
I'll join in.

I realized the other day when I reorganized my pantry that I have lots of ingredients and not much "food."

This last winter my project was homemade marshmallows. They we're so much fun and when I brought them to work everyone was like "you can make marshmallows at home?"

Anyway, this summer the project is going to be potstickers. Anyone have a recipe? I want to make hundreds for my new-to-me deep freeze for quick dinners or to give as gifts to my fellow over-worked moms at holiday time.

Great thread!
post #42 of 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by homefrontgirl View Post
I'll join in.

I realized the other day when I reorganized my pantry that I have lots of ingredients and not much "food."

This last winter my project was homemade marshmallows. They we're so much fun and when I brought them to work everyone was like "you can make marshmallows at home?"

Anyway, this summer the project is going to be potstickers. Anyone have a recipe? I want to make hundreds for my new-to-me deep freeze for quick dinners or to give as gifts to my fellow over-worked moms at holiday time.

Great thread!
Okay, I have to know how you make homemade marshmallows!
post #43 of 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by nadia105 View Post
Okay, I have to know how you make homemade marshmallows!
Here's the recipe that turned out to be my favorite. I've done both the strawberry and the vanilla.

Two things that I highly recommend you have are a stand mixer and a candy thermometer. You can make marshmallows from scratch without them, but it's not as fun and you might burn out a hand-held mixer.

Really the flavors/shape combinations are endless with these which you can't get with a bag of Stay-Puffed. Just one more reason I love to cook from scratch!:
post #44 of 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by homefrontgirl View Post
Here's the recipe that turned out to be my favorite. I've done both the strawberry and the vanilla.

Two things that I highly recommend you have are a stand mixer and a candy thermometer. You can make marshmallows from scratch without them, but it's not as fun and you might burn out a hand-held mixer.

Really the flavors/shape combinations are endless with these which you can't get with a bag of Stay-Puffed. Just one more reason I love to cook from scratch!:
Thanks! I have a Kitchen Aid, but not the thermometer, that would be easy enough to pick up. My kids would love this!
post #45 of 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norasmomma View Post
I make my own Caeser salad dressing almost nightly(while being pg got a craving that has not left, gotta have the Caeser).
I loves me some Caesar dressing! Care to share your recipe, pretty, pretty please?
post #46 of 384
Oh of course, it is egg free because I had to have it literally every day while pregnant. Although I just changed it up a little recently, but here are both versions.

Caeser Salad Dressing

1/2 a large lemon juiced and zested
1 clove garlic(not a huge one) grated or minced finely
1 teaspoon dijion mustard
salt and pepper to taste
about a 1/4 cup EVOO
now I also add a about 2 teaspoons-1tablespoon mayo

mix all ingredients except olive oil in bowl, slowly drizzle in oil while mixing with a fork, once it's mixed toss with romaine, parmesan and croutons. Viola yummy Ceaser.

I'm sure you can add other ingredients that are common in other Caeser dressings, worchestershire sauce or anchovie paste, but this is good. It my adaptation of Deborah Madison's in Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, so if you have that you can reference there. HTH. Oh and BTW I am making it tonight, Chicken Caeser-yummy.
post #47 of 384
This is the one I have written down that I have been using for years. Not sure where I got it.

2 anchovy fillets, rinsed and finely chopped
2 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 dash Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup olive oil (important to not use extra-virgin because it's too strong)

Chop anchovies and garlic and grind into a paste with the flat of the knife. Whisk egg, egg yolk, lemon juice and Worcestershire together with anchovy and garlic paste until smooth. While whisking, drizzle in olive oil until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

A chef friend of mine said that if you are worried about the eggs, you can whisk all of the ingredients (before the olive oil addition) over a double-boiler set to a very, very low temp to slightly cook the mixture without loosing the creaminess. I've never tried that.
post #48 of 384
I used to cook a lot, but have been doing almost no cooking at all since I started law school last fall. Our diet has pretty much turned into crap as a result. I really need to figure out my schedule so I can start doing some cooking again.

Someone up thread asked for a pasta recipe. I haven't made pasta in a while, but it really is easy! This is how I make pasta if it is ultimately going to be noodles; if you are going to stuff the pasta (like ravioli), you only need 1/2 the amount.

For each adult size portion, you need 1 Cup flour, 1 egg, a little bit of oil and a pinch of salt and perhaps a little water. I have a granite slab I use as a work surface, so use make pasta on that surface. But you can make it in a bowl. Form a well in the center of the flour, put the egg in the well and drizzle in a little oil and a pinch of salt. With a fork, start mixing the egg into the flour. When the dough is stiff enough, start mixing it with your hands and kneading it. When it is well mixed, wrap in plastic wrap and allow to rest for an hour before rolling it out and shaping it as desired.

Pasta dough is *very* stiff -- stiffer than bread dough. If you make it too sticky, it will be difficult to roll it out properly.

If you do not want to use eggs, you can use water. An egg is equivalent to about 1/4 cup of water. You can blend fresh herbs into the liquid before mixing it into the pasta before mixing it in with the flour.

Homemade pasta cooks much quicker than dried -- usually only a couple minutes in boiling water.
post #49 of 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norasmomma View Post
Oh of course, it is egg free because I had to have it literally every day while pregnant. Although I just changed it up a little recently, but here are both versions.

Caeser Salad Dressing

1/2 a large lemon juiced and zested
1 clove garlic(not a huge one) grated or minced finely
1 teaspoon dijion mustard
salt and pepper to taste
about a 1/4 cup EVOO
now I also add a about 2 teaspoons-1tablespoon mayo

mix all ingredients except olive oil in bowl, slowly drizzle in oil while mixing with a fork, once it's mixed toss with romaine, parmesan and croutons. Viola yummy Ceaser.

I'm sure you can add other ingredients that are common in other Caeser dressings, worchestershire sauce or anchovie paste, but this is good. It my adaptation of Deborah Madison's in Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, so if you have that you can reference there. HTH. Oh and BTW I am making it tonight, Chicken Caeser-yummy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
This is the one I have written down that I have been using for years. Not sure where I got it.

2 anchovy fillets, rinsed and finely chopped
2 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 large egg
1 large egg yolk
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 dash Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup olive oil (important to not use extra-virgin because it's too strong)

Chop anchovies and garlic and grind into a paste with the flat of the knife. Whisk egg, egg yolk, lemon juice and Worcestershire together with anchovy and garlic paste until smooth. While whisking, drizzle in olive oil until emulsified. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

A chef friend of mine said that if you are worried about the eggs, you can whisk all of the ingredients (before the olive oil addition) over a double-boiler set to a very, very low temp to slightly cook the mixture without loosing the creaminess. I've never tried that.
Thank you both!! I will have to try them

ETA: Does anyone here buy whole chickens instead of parts? I have been stocking up and freezing them and have run into an issue. When I try to thaw them, they take days in the fridge. With meat I throw it into a sink with some water, but for chicken I'm a little hesitant to do so because I don't want it sitting out too long. Is there another method to this?
post #50 of 384
I'm pretty new to making from scratch but I'm getting more and more committed and enthused. My main motivation is that I want my child to have the ability to cook for him/herself without relying on boxes and cans. My mom was always a box and can kinda person, and I'm trying to move away from that. The thing is, my mom really did mean for us to eat healthy, but she didn't really seem to understand that canned green beans have all the vitamins sucked out and a lot of sodium sucked in. I think it's a cycle I really want to make. Thankfully hubby likes to cook, and I like constantly learning new things.
post #51 of 384
Amy1st, my yogurt-maker doesn't have the little cups--it came with a great big 2-quart tub, but I've been making it in 1-quart mason jars to avoid the plastic.

To those wondering about pizza crust, I like this recipe. I got tired of the one we'd been using, from I forget what cookbook, and started making some that I found online. This has been my favorite, and I totally fudge on rising times and it's still fine.
post #52 of 384
I LOVE this thread :

We're probably about 80% from scratch and I'm also asking myself everyday if I could be making something else. I've always loved to cook and was lucky enough to have a mother who is a wonderful cook and taught me so much. We have a small garden this year and next year it will be much bigger. We just didn't have time this spring with a new (very early) baby.

DD is allergic to all things dairy : and I grew up on a farm so I was used to cooking with a lot of milk and butter and I've had to change it all to soy and find a lot of new recipes.


I've recently mastered flour tortillas - but I need to branch out and add some variety to them. My mom makes spinich tortillas and a tomato kind (note to self - get recipes from mom ) And I do make a mean hotdog/hamburger roll!

My biggest things right now are snacks. DD loves the annies bunnies. DH & I love pretzels. And I can make soft pretzels - but not the hard ones. ( I do make cookies and cakes from scratch - but as far as easy just grab and run snacks... ) And I'm still using black beans in a can . I hate beans so when I make them for DH & DD I like it to be as painless as possible.

PS -Thanks for the marshmallow recipe. I would have never thought of that!
post #53 of 384
I love to cook from scratch! I don't have as much time latley with a 4mo, 2yo and 4yo under foot. Anyway I wanted to post my Cabbage Pico de gallo recipe. Okay not a measured resipe so just add how ever much you like of each thing.
1. Shredded cabage
2. green onions (all of it, even the green stem)
3. Jalapeno
4. garlic
5. cilantro
6. Diced tomato
7. Salt
8. Lime juice
Yummy with chips or in a 7 layer dip.
post #54 of 384
Thanks to those who replied to my calls for pasta, enchilada sauce and cabbage pico de gallo. One question on the pico de gallo, do you use pickled jalepeno? My step sis made it once and her recipe was basically the same as yours, only she used pickled jalepenos. Yummmm, we are having tacos tonight I may have to whip some up.
post #55 of 384
the recipe posted is pretty much identical to the one I use, and I use fresh jalapenos when I've got them - otherwise it's pickled. I prefer the fresh, though
post #56 of 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Norasmomma View Post
I'm here to see if anyone can steer me in a good direction for homemade pasta, I was given the pasta attachment for my KitchenAid by my neighbor, and I would love to make raviolis or something yummy.
I have a great Williams Sonoma recipe book just on pasta. It has a good basic pasta recipe and instructions on making ravioli, tortellini, spinach pasta, etc. Your Kitchen Aid attachment will be a lifesaver. My grandmother used to make pasta with the old-fashioned hand-crank machine. That was hard work!

If you've never made pasta before, you might want to try something simpler, like fettucine. The first time I made pasta, I made ravioli (butternut squash & sage filling). It's a lot more work than making "regular" pasta and it made me associate making pasta with "too much work."
post #57 of 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by holidaymama View Post
Well we are suburbanites with a small...or I could say no yard so a garden for me is not in the cards in this house... bought.
That's what I thought, too! We live on a tiny urban lot, but did put in square foot gardens. You can see them here:

http://www.retroragswi.com/2008Garden.htm

I need to update with July photos, so you can actually see some of the plants.
post #58 of 384
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amys1st View Post

I also use yogurt for not only every morning at breakfast, but for salad dressings, cooking and dips. I have the yogurt maker but its little jars and they would be gone in no time! But I might try to start some just to see how much we use and how quickly...
I have 4 of these:

http://www.ultimate-weight-products....M9&QTS=froogle

I was making more yogurt, but now I only make 2 at a time since we use only raw milk and I just don't have enough milk (11 gallons isn't enough for us).

Wide mouth mason jars fit perfectly. So I heat up 6 cups of milk to 180 degrees. I cool it to 115 degrees then add sugar, vanilla and about a half cup of plain Seven Star yogurt as starter. I let it stay warm for 4-5 hours depending on how thick it is. We aren't much for super tart yogurt.

I was using 2 Donvier yogurt makers that each had 8 little cups, but that was filling up my dishwasher too fast.
post #59 of 384
Both a cooking from scratch and a frugality question. I am in *LOVE* with using shallots instead of onions for so many of my recipes. I particularly enjoy them floured and sauteed to put on my garlic mashed potatoes. The problem is that they are quite expensively sold like 2 or 3 to a mesh bag at T.J. or other grocery stores. At one point, I found them at Costco (large bag) for a good price, but they no longer carry them. Does anyone have ideas of good places to buy shallots in bulk?
post #60 of 384
We cook nearly everything from scratch... Although some things I have found it a waste of my time. Actually like wheat tortillas. It was so much time for me to get them all good and flat, and I can get them for so cheap here. But the scratch ones do taste SO much better - see now, I'm getting hungry for scratch ones, I may have to go make some!

that's funny about whoever said they only cook bread in the Winter, b/c I usually much more enjoy cooking it in the Summer! Mine never rises as well in the Winter - the house is kept fairly cool.

We just got an old hand-crank ice cream maker at a yard sale that the kids are LOVING! I think it's pretty neat too I made cow's milk ice cream from the $1.49/half-gallon of organic milk at the discount store, but I'm not a huge fan of cow's milk. I make my own soymilk (cost is much better at about 15 cents/half-gallon), so this weekend at my son's 5th birthday party, we're going to have a go at soymilk ice cream!

We hardly ever eat yogurt, but would like to more... I think I'll use all the great yogurt tips and try to make it. I mostly don't buy it because of the cost and the plastic packaging. I think I'll try it next week ... thanks for the inspiration!
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