or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Anyone else fear CPS?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Anyone else fear CPS? - Page 3

post #41 of 71
What gets me is, if so many abusive parents are "seemingly perfect" -- why all the focus on messy houses or pressure on parents to force toilet-training before the child is interested? If kids in spotlessly clean houses are just as likely to be abused as kids in messy ones, it makes about as much sense for a worker to keep coming back to reinspect 'cause the house is too neat.

Yeah, I realize my messy house in itself wouldn't get my kids snatched away -- but I've heard enough to think it might cause a worker to say, "I'll be coming back to make sure you get this cleaned up," which can be stressful -- 'cause, you know, we do sometimes get the mess cleaned up, but it's not like you can call the worker and say, "Come inspect our house right now while it's clean!"

So by the time they make it back by, it might be trashed again. So then they'd leave the case open so they could keep coming back. Which would provide more opportunity for them for catch parents having a bad day.

I've also heard that CPS workers do profiling: Since abuse and neglect aren't always obvious, workers are taught to be more wary of factors like a parent being in the military, or parents having more than one child (meaning the more children you have, the more potential they see for abuse), low-income ...

I've even heard that some CPS workers are leery of homeschoolers, and think we're just keeping our kids out of school so we can treat them however we want without the outside world knowing.

I agree that no child should have to live in fear. But I also don't think that the harassments I've heard of are a necessary sacrifice that we all have to be willing to make, to protect abused children. It seems that these harassments are actually taking resources and energy away from the children and families that actually need the intervention.
post #42 of 71
A messy house is a problem if the child can get sick (old food, fecal matter) or hurt themselves from the debris/clutter.
It can be evidence of someone suffering from depression/mental illness and thus the family is in need of some support.

I realize that a social worker coming to one's house doesn't feel supportive, just scary and intrusive, but their mandate is to keep kids safe.
post #43 of 71
At least the ones I dealt with the second time seemed pretty decent. They seemed to realize that the problem is my husband and it is more that he needs parenting courses (he kept trying to leave dd1 in the pool alone while he went to the other pool beside it and carried dd2 incorrectly. They even admitted that the person who called them should not have called but that they automatically do have to investigate. The person who called also told them they thought I was physically abused::: which CPS thought was nuts when they met me. There was absolutely no basis for that and I suspect it was prejudice and stereotyping (he is arabic and ALL arabic men MUST abuse....too bad my friends father had a Ukrainian background and was physically abusive...must be arabic somewhere there)I live in a town where there are no arabic people at all. I have a friend who does not work for CPS but crosses paths too and she broke up laughing when I told her. He does/did try to dominate me by trying to control me but I gave it back to him each time. We are thinking the way he maybe spoke to the lifeguards at the ymca bugged them (he does sound kind of loud and gruff but Iraqis ARE loud and gruff people.....it is the way they speak). I am staying with a friend right now because I am angry at this CPS thing and I want him to take the parenting courses. My beef is there was no basis to call CPS (and to lie and say I was abused? excuse me?) and waste their time when there are children who are slipping through the cracks everyday. But as a pp mentioned, the system is not perfect.
post #44 of 71
Yes I definitely am! DD recently had a serious staph infection-- she had 4 skin boils bad enough to leave dark circular scars and one boil abscessed and she was hospitalized. I was very nervous in the hospital. They did ask questions about the other scars but seemed to believe me that they were from boils. And of course, just the fact that she had boils made me nervous, maybe they thought I never bathe her. But the truth is I bathe her constantly, sometimes 2x a day.

I'm also flaky about sending in my homeschool paperwork...
post #45 of 71
Quote:
I talked to CPS about it (thankfully they came to me alone but are going to visit him on Monday to see him apparently) and told them some of the irresponsible things he has done
It really seems to me that telling them more stupid things he's done would do you more harm than good though.
post #46 of 71
While its frustrating that people get investigated for things as little as a messy house...but they look for factors that indicate neglect..not nesesarly a messy house...and usually they only make a fuss if small children are present...face it...small kids get into things. But if someone calls, then they have to investigate.

And yes they do profile. And its seem unfair...but statistics do show that abuse is more likely to happen in some situations.

Social workers get the brunt of the frustation. People focus on them because they are the faces they see..but its not the social workers that make the calls, and its not the social workers that make the rules. They go to college with the intention of helping kids, protecting those who need protecting, and end up getting over worked, underpaid, and thought of as the destroyers of families. I have a friend who is a social worker. I asked her about parents being afraid...she says that she thinks it sucks that people are afraid...but for her, it sucks that she has to look at a family and do her best to determine if there is abuse. She allwyas goes in hopeing that there isn't anything...but turns every stone...because if she misses somthing...if there is abuse and she doesnt' see it.....what if she wakes up and see a kid that she could have protected in the news...because she missed somthing. Her words were "A family can heal from an investigation, but a dead child can't."

I don't envy her job, but I'm thankful that there are people out there like her who are willing to take up a career like that. Its a thankless job. But they do save lifes, and they do repair familes, and they protect children when its needed. It sucks that they have to be the bad guy, and the system isn't perfect...it is made up of humans who are just as capable of making mistakes as you and me...I've screwed up at work...but if I over look something at work..no big deal...but for them the worst case senario of them missing soemthing is a dead child.

And rumors of them taking kids for homeshcooling, or not vax, or not potty training....are probably just that...rumors. I've met familes that had their kids taken away taht claimed it was because their house was a mess...then you find out that it was mostly because the kids were rarely bathed, had skin rashes due to nelglect, lice, tooth decay due to lack of hygeine. There is usually a deeper story then the parents are willing to admit when children are taken away.
post #47 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindsaye3 View Post
And a few years later her son #2 sprayed himself with her mace - ER trip and eye wash out. And yes a few days later he did it again (that time she just called the doc and washed his eyes out at home)!
I know the above passage is not funny at all--especially if it were to happen to your own kids--but I can't help but giggle at the thought of that child learning such a hard lesson TWICE! Good grief!
post #48 of 71
I take issue with the flat statements some are making that "if someone calls, they have to investigate." This is simply inaccurate. I am a foster parent and a mandatory reporter. I am very familiar with the system. In all the states I have lived in, calls are screened, and not every call leads to an investigation.

The myth that all calls=an investigation is one of the reasons people turn a blind eye when they are concerned. They worry what will happen if it is no big deal or if they are wrong. I think kids wait longer for help in legitimate abuse cases because people are afraid to call.

The fact of the matter is, many calls are screened out with no investigation ever completed. The reasons for this are many and varied. It may be that the described situation doesn't meet some standard of "what counts." For example, I have mentioned on other threads and maybe on this one about my dw calling when a kid she had taught for a couple of years finally told her his father beat him regularly with a clothing hanger. She had a very strong feeling (based on other hints the child had given) that this was the tip of the iceberg, and that an investigation would turn up much greater abuse. BUT, when she called, she was informed that hitting a child with a hanger doesn't constitute a need for an investigation, particularly as no bruising was evident to my dw (though it may have been under clothing). In that state, the defining factor in when a beating becomes abuse is when it leaves a mark on a child for more than a half hour.

In other cases, investigations are screened out for reasons such as proper support in the home. I once made a cooperative call with a mother of a young mom who was neglecting her baby (the mother's grandchild). Because the young mom was living with her own mother (the child's grandmother), the grandmother was able to "make up" for the neglect issues, protecting the child from the consequences. Thus, the screener for the call screened it out for the purposes of investigation. However, on our request, she did send this young mom a letter informing her of the concerns, giving her information on some medical issues that had been neglected, and referring her to a number of support resources in the community. In that case, even if it had been investigated, I doubt it would have constituted a removal of the child from her home. But I do think it would have led the mother to greater resources and given her the push to UTILIZE the resources she needed.

Recently, a member right here at MDC called out of concern regarding her BIL's abusive behavior with his kids. The call was screened out for investigation, by the account given to us, in part because the mother was present and seemed to provide the children with some protection.

At least in the places I have lived, MOST calls don't go anywhere. A minority percentage result in investigation, and still a greater minority result in removal of a child from the home.

Yes, there are abuses within the system. I've seen them first hand. And being on the receiving end of an unwarranted investigation I can only imagine is heartbreaking and absolutely destructive (I already posted that I do fear this). But I think it is important that we have our facts straight here, and the notion that all calls lead to investigation is simply a misnomer in many locations. Also, while there are awful anecdotal stories of abuses within the system, statistically speaking, there are so many children who are removed from truly abusive and neglectful situations while parents get it back together. And many parents do get it back together. In the places I've lived, only a minority of foster care cases ever result in any kind of termination of parental rights and longterm alternative to the child going back home.

Quote:
A messy house is a problem if the child can get sick (old food, fecal matter) or hurt themselves from the debris/clutter.
This is absolutely true, and I think where the concern comes from.

Most (not all, but most) of the social workers I have worked with over the years have had good common sense about this. I get worried even before our regular home visits when we have a foster kido with us. I always make sure to do a good cleaning of the house. But one of our social workers even said to me about himself: "The big joke around the office is how if anyone ever called CPS on me, my kids would get removed because of what a disaster my house is. Don't worry. I have kids too. I know what it is like. Just relax."

I know there are social workers who don't have a good grasp on reality. I have certainly worked with a few. I will never feel comfortable with some social workers when they are in my home. So I am not trying to downplay this.

But I think we ought to honor the many smart, common sense, decent social workers who are out there every.single.day visiting homes and making good, supportive decisions that help families.

Quote:
It can be evidence of someone suffering from depression/mental illness and thus the family is in need of some support.
Yup! Myth #2 is that investigation always=removal of a child. In many cases, this simply doesn't happen. I don't remember the exact figures, but the statistics are striking...like, maybe 1% of investigations result in removal or something??? In many cases, the investigations lead no where and the cases are closed. In some cases, support services are made available to families and removal of children is prevented through intervention.

The foster kids who have come into my care have almost 100% been cases of very straight-forward abuse or neglect, and have definitely been severe enough to warrant removal of the child from the home.

Quote:
I realize that a social worker coming to one's house doesn't feel supportive, just scary and intrusive
Absolutely. I think this is deserving of our consideration. When I got trained as a foster mom, we were told, "It isn't a matter of IF you will be investigated. Statistically, as a foster parent, there is a good chance you WILL be investigated, and it is more of question of how and why and when." I live with a high degree of fear as a result. As foster parents, we have all kinds of regulatory folks in our lives...we have angry and hurt birthparents...we have constant home visits...we have children who are processing a lot of hurt from their pasts and who sometimes are very mixed up...

If a social worker showed up unexpectedly at my door and told me I was being investigated, you can bet I would be too scared and too hurt and too angry and too sad and too shaken up to benefit at all from the experience. Seriously, just talking about it scares the living daylights out of me. But, on the other hand, I do understand that:

Quote:
their mandate is to keep kids safe.
and I even in all that fear I can recognize that:

Quote:
"A family can heal from an investigation, but a dead child can't."
That said, veronicalynne, it does sound like prejudice and bigotry where a part of the impetus for the call YMCA made to CPS in your case, and that is awful. And to all parents who have experienced unecessary investigations, my heart breaks for you and I am so sorry.
post #49 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
It really seems to me that telling them more stupid things he's done would do you more harm than good though.

Normally I would agree but I wanted them to realize that the problem seems to be lack of proper parenting skills and possible cultural issues. He is from a culture where you let your very young children outside unsupervised because others will watch which I cannot get him to understand that you cannot do here in Canada or the States. They do know that there is an issue here but I wanted them to realize it is not neglect or whatever garbage the YMCA was saying.....and I do believe he needs to be educated a bit on child safety. I want someone to get through to him that the way children are or were raised in his country is not acceptable here. CPS already said that the call was unwarranted but they thought he does need to learn alternate parenting skills. I never realized how different child rearing can be in different countries (naive I know) especially when it comes to supervision and carseats etc. I am just afraid that CPS will be called again if we dont address this now and to be honest, I am exhausted emotionally with the stuff he has done and cant get through to him. They wondered why he kept leaving her in the pool unsupervised and trying to lift dd2 by one arm (both of which I have argued with him about). In any case, they dont think it was appropriate for CPS to have been called.
post #50 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sierra View Post
I take issue with the flat statements some are making that "if someone calls, they have to investigate." This is simply inaccurate. I am a foster parent and a mandatory reporter. I am very familiar with the system. In all the states I have lived in, calls are screened, and not every call leads to an investigation.

The myth that all calls=an investigation is one of the reasons people turn a blind eye when they are concerned. They worry what will happen if it is no big deal or if they are wrong. I think kids wait longer for help in legitimate abuse cases because people are afraid to call.

The fact of the matter is, many calls are screened out with no investigation ever completed. The reasons for this are many and varied. It may be that the described situation doesn't meet some standard of "what counts." For example, I have mentioned on other threads and maybe on this one about my dw calling when a kid she had taught for a couple of years finally told her his father beat him regularly with a clothing hanger. She had a very strong feeling (based on other hints the child had given) that this was the tip of the iceberg, and that an investigation would turn up much greater abuse. BUT, when she called, she was informed that hitting a child with a hanger doesn't constitute a need for an investigation, particularly as no bruising was evident to my dw (though it may have been under clothing). In that state, the defining factor in when a beating becomes abuse is when it leaves a mark on a child for more than a half hour.

In other cases, investigations are screened out for reasons such as proper support in the home. I once made a cooperative call with a mother of a young mom who was neglecting her baby (the mother's grandchild). Because the young mom was living with her own mother (the child's grandmother), the grandmother was able to "make up" for the neglect issues, protecting the child from the consequences. Thus, the screener for the call screened it out for the purposes of investigation. However, on our request, she did send this young mom a letter informing her of the concerns, giving her information on some medical issues that had been neglected, and referring her to a number of support resources in the community. In that case, even if it had been investigated, I doubt it would have constituted a removal of the child from her home. But I do think it would have led the mother to greater resources and given her the push to UTILIZE the resources she needed.

Recently, a member right here at MDC called out of concern regarding her BIL's abusive behavior with his kids. The call was screened out for investigation, by the account given to us, in part because the mother was present and seemed to provide the children with some protection.

At least in the places I have lived, MOST calls don't go anywhere. A minority percentage result in investigation, and still a greater minority result in removal of a child from the home.

Yes, there are abuses within the system. I've seen them first hand. And being on the receiving end of an unwarranted investigation I can only imagine is heartbreaking and absolutely destructive (I already posted that I do fear this). But I think it is important that we have our facts straight here, and the notion that all calls lead to investigation is simply a misnomer in many locations. Also, while there are awful anecdotal stories of abuses within the system, statistically speaking, there are so many children who are removed from truly abusive and neglectful situations while parents get it back together. And many parents do get it back together. In the places I've lived, only a minority of foster care cases ever result in any kind of termination of parental rights and longterm alternative to the child going back home.



This is absolutely true, and I think where the concern comes from.

Most (not all, but most) of the social workers I have worked with over the years have had good common sense about this. I get worried even before our regular home visits when we have a foster kido with us. I always make sure to do a good cleaning of the house. But one of our social workers even said to me about himself: "The big joke around the office is how if anyone ever called CPS on me, my kids would get removed because of what a disaster my house is. Don't worry. I have kids too. I know what it is like. Just relax."

I know there are social workers who don't have a good grasp on reality. I have certainly worked with a few. I will never feel comfortable with some social workers when they are in my home. So I am not trying to downplay this.

But I think we ought to honor the many smart, common sense, decent social workers who are out there every.single.day visiting homes and making good, supportive decisions that help families.



Yup! Myth #2 is that investigation always=removal of a child. In many cases, this simply doesn't happen. I don't remember the exact figures, but the statistics are striking...like, maybe 1% of investigations result in removal or something??? In many cases, the investigations lead no where and the cases are closed. In some cases, support services are made available to families and removal of children is prevented through intervention.

The foster kids who have come into my care have almost 100% been cases of very straight-forward abuse or neglect, and have definitely been severe enough to warrant removal of the child from the home.



Absolutely. I think this is deserving of our consideration. When I got trained as a foster mom, we were told, "It isn't a matter of IF you will be investigated. Statistically, as a foster parent, there is a good chance you WILL be investigated, and it is more of question of how and why and when." I live with a high degree of fear as a result. As foster parents, we have all kinds of regulatory folks in our lives...we have angry and hurt birthparents...we have constant home visits...we have children who are processing a lot of hurt from their pasts and who sometimes are very mixed up...

If a social worker showed up unexpectedly at my door and told me I was being investigated, you can bet I would be too scared and too hurt and too angry and too sad and too shaken up to benefit at all from the experience. Seriously, just talking about it scares the living daylights out of me. But, on the other hand, I do understand that:



and I even in all that fear I can recognize that:



That said, veronicalynne, it does sound like prejudice and bigotry where a part of the impetus for the call YMCA made to CPS in your case, and that is awful. And to all parents who have experienced unecessary investigations, my heart breaks for you and I am so sorry.
Sorry, it was the CPS who said they had to automatically investigate. Maybe they said it to mollify me? I dont know. Or maybe the YMCA made it sound bad or something? All I know is CPS thinks it was inappropriate for them to have been called. One of my husbands friends had CPS called on them too but I dont know why. But again, they are not North American and I know I had to warn them not to leave their kids in the car to sleep unsupervised even with the door open (I am born Canadian and not of arabic background at all and it horrified me when I found out). I assume CPS in the States and Canada have the same policies? I have a friend who works in a parallel area who crosses with CPS all the time and she is going to try to find out what the YMCA said exactly. I am planning to lodge a complaint in any case. If their call was a legimate concern, I can understand that. My husband does sound gruff and I know he was frustrating the lifeguards (can you imagine how I must feel?) but they had no basis for trying to tell CPS I was physically abused. I just am not sure who exactly who to complain to. The manager at the YMCA wont care even when we cancel our membership but I do want to address the prejudice there.
post #51 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by sebandg'smama View Post
A messy house is a problem if the child can get sick (old food, fecal matter) or hurt themselves from the debris/clutter.
It can be evidence of someone suffering from depression/mental illness and thus the family is in need of some support.

I realize that a social worker coming to one's house doesn't feel supportive, just scary and intrusive, but their mandate is to keep kids safe.
Right, and I tend to have confidence that a social worker can tell the difference between the morning's breakfast dishes being left out vs. a week or more's old food around, a stained carpet vs. a filthy carpet, toys left out vs. no room to walk, etc. etc. etc.

I would like to think that anyone could come into my home and realize that we are a pretty normal family that has some average mess, but that we're all happy and healthy.

But, you know I don't need to have that experience to find out for sure.

I do think that there are stereotypes of the characteristics of an abusive or neglectful family, and unfortunately I'd be a lot more worried if we were living in a rough neighborhood, in low-income housing, or in areas where other kids were being abused.... you know, where I'm in an area where other parents and kids are having real problems.

I think I would let a CPS worker in my door anytime, but it also depends on my assessment of if they were someone reasonable or not, and how nicely they asked and how they answered my questions. That is me living in a safe, quiet neighborhood with virtually nothing to fear.

I also think if there were truly something wrong, we have stable and secure family who could take temporary custody of the kids. If our family was messed up and I had no one to back me up, I'd be a lot more cautious.
post #52 of 71
CPS is handled different in every state .
CPS is handled different in every county or city/town .
CPS will always be the enemy by either doing to much or doing to little

We like to say we live in a "class-less" society but we don't ..

Our "class" plays a role in how CPS responds to different reports ..

Where we live plays a role in how CPS responds to reports ..

Through television and film we are more likely to believe that the person with the minimum wage job is more likely to abuse their child then the person who makes $6figures ..
Someone with "less education" is more likely to respond in a negative way toward CPS making them investigate more ..
Someone with a "higher" education is more likely to "work the system" and get away with things..

I like to think about all those "laws of attraction" books out there ..
If you believe it , then it will come true..
If someone is constantly fearful of CPS then they will act defensive or strange when talking to people making others think they are hiding something . resulting in a call to CPS
post #53 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by azfiresmbm View Post
Someone with a "higher" education is more likely to "work the system" and get away with things..
Oh. Well, maybe my BS degree will come in handy for me after all. But I agree with KBecks -- I don't feel a need to have the experience so I can find out for sure. I hope I never have to use these brains in that way. And here's another big for all who are dealing with CPS at this time. Please keep us posted, guys! I'm rooting for you!

I'm torn as to whether I'd invite them in or not, it would probably depend on my gut-feeling at the moment. If they were behaving at all suspiciously, I'd probably decline the in-house visit unless they had a warrant (and do like my friend did and immediately contract with a lawyer -- once you do that you don't have to deal with CPS directly, all communication goes through the lawyer).

Of course, I've heard they're more suspicious about people who don't voluntarily open their homes. I'm really a hospitable gal, I've just heard that CPS-workers are there to look for flaws, not chat. I prefer the chatty folks who don't walk through opening cabinets and revealing all my housekeeping flaws. I know, I know, they only care if the mess is hazardous to my children.

But guess what -- whether it's hazardous to children is totally a matter of opinion. What's livable to one person is gross to another. I don't want abused children to keep being abused -- I just fail to see how sacrificing everyone's freedom and privacy is the only way to save the children. Especially since a spotlessly clean house is no guarantee that abuse is "not" happening.
post #54 of 71
CPS visits my house regularly. At least 3 times a month. they never say anything about how my house looks and sometimes it looks ragged. but i know where the line is. dont have garbage the house or in the yard. wash the dishes once a day. keep cleanish clothes on your kid. bathe them every other day or so. make sure they are kept out of danger of all kinds. offer them loving attention. that is what my cps worker basically told me.
by the way, i am not the one who got in trouble, it was my SCs other parent. i have been in trouble myself before. 10 years ago i wasnt taking care of my DS. i was smoking pot and not picking up the cat feces off the floor. My poor DS. i am glad they came. i am not glad they took him away (i got him back after two months) but it was what i needed. i would have kept on the way i was if they hadnt shown me i was ruining his life. today he is a happy guy. he does remember them taking him and why. it put a strain on our realtionship but my hard work at making it better for us has done a lot to redeem his trust in me. he knows i wont let him down again.

i am not scared if CPS. well.. maybe a little. i dont tell them i co-sleep, or questioning the whole vax thing. they no i BF but i might not let them know how long i plan on doing it (CLW).
my point, i guess, was that CPS isnt always a bad thing. they do a lot of good for kids who need it. DS and I are grateful that our life was changed for the better.
post #55 of 71
LionessMom, I'm glad it worked out for you!
post #56 of 71
Quote:
Through television and film we are more likely to believe that the person with the minimum wage job is more likely to abuse their child then the person who makes $6figures ..
Is that a just stereotype? Or is it statistics and studies?
post #57 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
Is that a just stereotype? Or is it statistics and studies?
Well, statistics and studies only show the abuse cases that have actually been called in and proven.

So, if CPS already has more of a slant toward investigating calls on people in lower-income neighborhoods, and if they're also doing profiling which makes them less-inclined to close investigations on families that fit a certain profile -- well, then, I certainly think statistics and studies will always be more likely to "prove" the stereotype.

Additionally, higher-income people are more likely to live in neighborhoods where there's more space between homes, and probably better insulation. In my dh's previous marriage, they got a visit from CPS when their baby was very fussy due to teething, and someone in their apartment-building was concerned that someone might be hurting the baby.

The investigation was closed immediately after the worker saw that the baby was teething, and there were clearly no signs of abuse or neglect. But if the worker'd seen anything to make her suspicious of foul play, there probably would have been further intervention and this low-income abuse case would have been added to the statistics "proving" that poorer people are more likely to hurt their kids.

In contrast, a teething child in a wealthy neighborhood is likely to go unheard by neighbors, so it wouldn't get called in to even be considered for investigation. So if there's "more going on," it's less likely to get discovered and added to statistics.

Also, I've heard enough anecdotal accounts of people getting called in by neighbors who are p!ssed at them about something, and want to get back at them through their kids.

I've heard that workers claim it's always "obvious" when it's just a revenge-call -- but I don't know, I think some of those calls probably get taken seriously and investigated.

I think that when people have purchased their own home in a neighborhood, they feel a little more settled and are less likely to want to do anything to antagonize their neighbors.

So while a concerned renter, or a renter who just didn't like her neighbors, might feel she had nothing to lose by picking up the phone -- a homeowner might be more inclined to give her neighbors the benefit-of-the-doubt, try to befriend the family she's concerned about, and so on.

So the more money a family has, the less likely they are to get called in, get investigated, and get added to abuse-statistics. Except in the rare cases where a child is murdered or brutally injured -- but I don't think the majority of abusive parents ever go to that extreme, whether rich or poor.

I honestly wish all profiling could be stopped, and each call could just be taken on its own merits, the worker deciding to investigate or not, based on what's said in the call and not what neighborhood the accused lives in.

And when investigating, I wish the workers could just focus on actual signs of abuse or neglect, and not get hung up on whether the family has enough characteristics to match any "profiles."

But then maybe more cases would get closed automatically, which might affect the funding for this public service?
post #58 of 71
I have never had an issue w/ CPS, but I actually kind of half-jokingly/half-seriously was worried that we might get a visit recently. DS broke his wrist in two places at school in April, then a month later I had to take DD into the ER for a nursemaid dislocation on her elbow, and then 3 weeks after THAT, DD fell and FRACTURED the SAME elbow. I was totally waiting for someone at the ER to ask me questions about my home situation or ask to interview my son!

I actually took DD back to the same ortho that DS had been to with his wrist and they just looked at me like what are YOU doing back here?!

I have accident prone kids, what can I say?
post #59 of 71
As homebirthing, non vaccinating, extended breastfeeding, homeschooler yes, I do.

I think my state and county are pretty good about accepting natural parenting but its still a fear.
post #60 of 71
Quote:
A lot of it is WHERE the bruises are. There are certain places/types of injuries that are difficult to self inflict. Some of it is whether the parent's story makes sense and is consistent.
This is very true. In nursing school, I had to take this seminar on child abuse because nurses are mandatory reporters. Kids have accidents, some more than others. There are other signs of child abuse that are looked for, combined with the type and location of injury.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Parenting
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Anyone else fear CPS?