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PSA: It's "voila", not "wallah" - Page 12

post #221 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3LilChunklins View Post

Might be off topic but I just have to share. I was raised in NJ, then after I got married we moved to NC. Redneck, is its own language. It took me years to understand the phrases and words. And if someone has a badd enough accent I still have trouble, even after 9 years!
here we go-
Yunns for ploural you
y'all for you all
Y'alls ploural of y'all (y'alls made it!)
Y'alls' ploural posessive (can we come to y'alls' house?)
Youngin for baby or child
plum over yonder for right over there

ETA-
Briches is redneck for pants
all sneakers are tennis shoes lol
Tatters as in potatoes
dressing for stuffing (this one baffled me for years. It was only recently that I realized they meant stuffing and not like salad dressing )

 

Southern culture has a language of it's own!!! Y'all is perfectly acceptable down here and I even use it. It's a southern thing! Although... y'all is plural on it's own. You is singular, y'all is plural, but there is the y'alls as a plural possessive (i.e. y'alls house).  I've never seen y'alls as a plural of y'all. That would be redundant. Sneakers are usually interchangeable with tennis shoes, taters is most often used for referring to a dish made from potatoes, britches and pants usually happen interchangeably also. Dressing though is "dressing" that we have at Thanksgiving. Stuffing is a different thing entirely and is some that is being "stuffed" into another food item like stuffed turkey or stuffed crabs have stuffing in them. Nobody here has "stuffing" for Thanksgiving because how is it stuffing if it isn't stuffed? LOL

 

Southerns do have a language of their own and the rednecks tend to run everything together. My MIL and her family do the one that drives me crazy the most though... everything ends in -er, as in win-der instead of win-dow! This woman actually tried to help my DD with homework one day... um thank you but DON'T!

 

We have entire populations of stupidity here though other than the redneck terminology. I seen or I seen'd, I been'd done that, She gone get, and the list goes on. AGHHHHH!!!!!! It's amazing how little education some people have. There word that I think makes me the craziest though is skreet as in "I done crossed that skreet," instead of "I crossed that street." 

 

Le Creuset is Le Creu-say not Le Creu-set

Herb is erb not Herb

post #222 of 238
Lol yes!! See, I still hadn't figured the dressing thing out tho LMBO thank you for clearing that up.
And just so you know I wasn't being mean or rude. If it makes you feel better you can pick on me for being a Yank!

And with my FIL everything that has a potato in it is taters (" fried taters, mashed taters, go digs us up some taters outta the garden")
It amuses me X D
post #223 of 238

LOL oh I wasn't offended. I AM southern and it makes me nuts! I think the dressing/stuffing thing is hilarious though. That's funny about your FIL. I know some people like that too with it always being taters. Just don't let him catch on to the win-der thing! :rotflmao

post #224 of 238

In some Southern areas, "all y'all" is plural  of y'all. As in, "There's room for all y'all in my pickup". Possessive is "y'all's", singular or plural, as in, "We couldn't all fit in y'all's Prius".

post #225 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3LilChunklins View Post

Lol yes!! See, I still hadn't figured the dressing thing out tho LMBO thank you for clearing that up.
And just so you know I wasn't being mean or rude. If it makes you feel better you can pick on me for being a Yank!

And with my FIL everything that has a potato in it is taters (" fried taters, mashed taters, go digs us up some taters outta the garden")
It amuses me X D


Does your FIL`s tater rule apply to potato fudge too?

post #226 of 238
Never heard of it. He's very fond of tater salad lol
post #227 of 238

LOL I'm pretty fond of pinto beans and taters myself :)

post #228 of 238

Oh, and a current trend that replaces while with whilst. Trying to be classy? Sounds pretentious to me. Same with amongst substituting for among. Sorry to whoever titled this forum.hide.gif

post #229 of 238
I don't say those but they sound poetic to me. The KJV bible uses 'em LOL
post #230 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamarhu View Post

Oh, and a current trend that replaces while with whilst. Trying to be classy? Sounds pretentious to me. Same with amongst substituting for among. Sorry to whoever titled this forum.hide.gif

The only people I know who say those words that way are from the U.K. That could be normal usage there.
post #231 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by oneKnight View Post

As a person who says "wa-wa" for water (in public I might add!)

We say wallah! It's the south and it's America, not Italy.
Who gives a rat's patooey?

France my dear France.  Yep, i agree that its not English.

post #232 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamarhu View Post
 

Oh, and a current trend that replaces while with whilst. Trying to be classy? Sounds pretentious to me. Same with amongst substituting for among. Sorry to whoever titled this forum.hide.gif

Whats classy got to do it? Its correct  English.

post #233 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post
 

Whats classy got to do it? Its correct  English.

Is while and among incorrect?

post #234 of 238

They are both correct  depending on the context.

post #235 of 238

to be more precise-

 

<<   Among and Amongst

The prepositions among and amongst both mean amidst, surrounded by or in the company of. They can be used interchangeably in the UK. In the US, amongst is very rare and is only really used in literary prose seeking to add a sense of the old fashioned. Most in the US would consider the use of amongst to be wrong in a formal document.

In the UK, life is easy. Brits can choose whichever version they think sounds best to them.

Some examples:

 
  • Truth springs from argument amongst friends.
    (Scottish philosopher David Hume, 1711-1776)
  • To put a cat amongst the pigeons.
    (Note: A well-known saying which means to cause a stir.)
  • Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.
    (W.H. Auden, 1907-1973)
  • Man is an animal which, alone among the animals, refuses to be satisfied by the fulfilment of animal desires.
    (Alexander Graham Bell, 1847-1922)
  • Reality is the leading cause of stress amongst those in touch with it.
    (American writer and producer Jane Wagner) >>

  from  http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_confused/among_amongst.htm#HGkBKUYpKh0DYyUe.99  
post #236 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post

Actually, seeing voila spelled  that way would bug me. I was playing devils advocate and convinced myself not to be bugged!

 

I still think that there are rules for English,  but those rules are not relevant to non English words. I think its admirable to get the words right, but not necessary. The question remains for me, what qualifies as English? 


Interesting question! A lot of those French words do seem like they ought to be part of the English language by now (and subject to alternate spellings). I want to say that I have seen (or used to see?) these words used in italics, as "intentionally French", in older books? Sort of like a way for people to show off how fancy they were.
post #237 of 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by contactmaya View Post
 

to be more precise-

 

<<   Among and Amongst

The prepositions among and amongst both mean amidst, surrounded by or in the company of. They can be used interchangeably in the UK. In the US, amongst is very rare and is only really used in literary prose seeking to add a sense of the old fashioned. Most in the US would consider the use of amongst to be wrong in a formal document.

In the UK, life is easy. Brits can choose whichever version they think sounds best to them.

Some examples:

 
  • Truth springs from argument amongst friends.
    (Scottish philosopher David Hume, 1711-1776)
  • To put a cat amongst the pigeons.
    (Note: A well-known saying which means to cause a stir.)
  • Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh.
    (W.H. Auden, 1907-1973)
  • Man is an animal which, alone among the animals, refuses to be satisfied by the fulfilment of animal desires.
    (Alexander Graham Bell, 1847-1922)
  • Reality is the leading cause of stress amongst those in touch with it.
    (American writer and producer Jane Wagner) >>

  from  http://www.grammar-monster.com/easily_confused/among_amongst.htm#HGkBKUYpKh0DYyUe.99  

Interesting!  I love learning about language and the way it develops!

post #238 of 238
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