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post #101 of 128
i love gtd. i am moving to europe, from canada, in 3.5 weeks, so i'm going a little nuts over here.

i have been using a combination of things, but i'd like to refine it. i modified flylady routines for household stuff. my partner and i both have 'mobile me' accounts, so that our iCal calendars are separate but we subscribe to appropriate ones. this is useful particularly in that if we have a dentist appointment i need him to agree to, it goes through a confirmation process and puts it into his calendar. i can also send clients these for meetings. ical also sinks with to-do's in Mail, which is where i am often brainstorming. with SO much to do i am also using Backpack, and i make use of lists, mostly, as well as using * * around words to bold them. when things are really crazy i'll do a day plan in there....you can set reminders, but i'm just using it for basics. my partner subscribes to the same pages, so he is sent updates when i make them, and can add things himself, delete...for example we have a running packing list.

my struggles right now are mostly with the physical stuff, keeping up with all of the regular routines when i'm really tired, trying to continue having a life with my children, but exhausted just at the thought of another bunch of paperwork for important cards or invoices, and having just moved here for the summer, i have piles of important papers, things in the wrong place, chaos!!!

i also have been impatiently waiting for midnight inbox to replace backpack for me, because it would work with an iphone and ical etc...but it is horribly slow in production and i may have to give up.

*
post #102 of 128
Subbing
post #103 of 128
I just found this thread. How are people doing?

I just gave up my Palm and am now using a Moleskine Planner/Notebook. I really felt like I needed to use a pen again. I found out I wasn't alone and that I might have traded a gadget addiction for a notebook addiction.

http://www.rohdesign.com/weblog/archives/001850.html

I'm still keeping a contacts backup on my laptop. Most often used numbers go right on to my cell phone. Eventually I'd like to get my contacts backed up on my ipod.

Instead of having different notebooks I've started to keep track of several "projects" in this one pocket notebook. Next year I might get the larger size but I like that it fits in any pocket book.

I read the GTD book. There were some things that I thought would work for me like the 2 minute rule, the stack of notebooks, good office supplies, an alphabetical filing system.
post #104 of 128
Hey all! how is everyone GTD or ZTD lately? I still have not read the GTD book, but I did download Zen to Done: The Ultimate Simple Productivity System and have really enjoyed it.

I'm restructuring my Remember the Milk. I have more tabs than I really need and it is getting cluttery, which kind of defeats the purpose.

ZenHabits posted another blog that I am enjoying - http://unclutterer.com/ Unclutterer recommends a goal setting program that I may give a go and see if I like since it has a free version. It can also sync with GoogleCal. Looks interesting. I'll report back with a thumbs up or down.
post #105 of 128
I'm really enjoying working the program! I have let go of joesgoals and put some things on Remember the Milk to repeat daily. The very first one that shows on my RTM daily list, every day, is "...Experience Joy" and that has made a huge difference in how I live my day. I like to think of each day as another opportunity for love, happiness, peace and joy and that little reminder helps me put things in perspective, makes it easier for me to say "no" to things that would have to be added to my RTM list that do not bring me joy. (Side note: the second and third things I have as "everydays" are blog and laundry, which do sometimes feel not-joyous, but having them be done is a sense of joy and peace.)

I also started using the sidebar function in firefox so on my tool bar I have a button that opens google calendar in my sidebar. This is helpful when I am checking our homeschool group calendars or scheduling doctor appointments.

I do not feel that I am using much beyond my dailies on RTM, though. I rarely go to the RTM site----I just use it almost exclusively in gmail. I still feel like it's a great tool, but I am not so much using it to its full capacity yet.
post #106 of 128
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawningmama View Post
I also started using the sidebar function in firefox so on my tool bar I have a button that opens google calendar in my sidebar. This is helpful when I am checking our homeschool group calendars or scheduling doctor appointments.
I am not geeky enough apparently. Where is this? I have my Google Cal in my iGoogle, but not in my sidebar.
post #107 of 128
Haven't read through the whole thread yet, but I use RTM and the way that is the most helpful to me is to put it in my Firefox side bar

http://lifehacker.com/5002003/keep-y...in-the-sidebar

That way when I am goofing off on the internet, my tasks are staring me in the face begging to be done.
post #108 of 128
The link in ali's post is good, and you can also look here. The article I read about it just had a linky-doo but I also read that you can do it through Firefox bookmarks--apparantly you can open any website from your bookmarks folders in a sidebar.
post #109 of 128
I tried and I broke my Yoono plugin, which can't be right, so I'm off to try re-installing. I may just stick to my iGoogle.
post #110 of 128
But it requires a big change.
post #111 of 128
hi everyone!
i've altered everything again since moving to england. we've been traveling, and only just moved into our flat, so i will have to test the newest set-up. i'm using an iphone, which is reasonable over here where it isn't in canada, and i've got 'things' on my computer + phone, ical, and 'pick&choose' for shopping. at the moment that's more than enough. if i had a really extensive list to build, for work, or a major project (our garden!) or for packing, i would return to using 'backpack'.

of course, things have been so wild we haven't had time for looking into how to synch 'things' with ical and with my phone....soon.

*
post #112 of 128
btw THANK YOU! to the person who mentioned THINGS!!! i love it.

*
post #113 of 128

Has anyone used GTDAgenda or GTDInbox?

Hi All,

I found this thread via a Google Search. Like many of you I am trying to figure out the best system for implementing GTD. I use RTM but confess that I haven't really set it up properly to get it out of it what I need. I discovered the FireFox Add-on GTDInbox which I really like. It installs and becomes part of your GMail interface and handles the Project aspects of GTD well. But then I discovered GTDAgenda which has Goals, Projects, Tasks, Schedules and Checklists. There is a free version and a paid version (which Schedules is part of). Anyways, I just need to decide on a system and get going with it but wanted to get some feedback to see if anyone has used these programs and if so if you have integrated them with RTM? I want to minimize the number of programs and keep it simple but you know how that goes!

Thanks for any feedback - off to do some more research!
post #114 of 128
Thread Starter 
LOVED THIS!

zen habits
Seven Productivity Tips For People That Hate GTD
Posted: 09 Apr 2009 05:07 PM PDT
Article by Zen Habits contributor Jonathan Mead; follow him on twitter.

Not everone gets GTD (Getting Things Done). I know I didn’t. It made my head spin.

I have nothing against the system or David Allen. I’m sure it must be awesome for some people (that’s why it has all those followers, right?). But for others, it just doesn’t fit. Mostly with creative-minded people.

When it comes to GTD and other systems, it’s often too easy to get into a habit of over-engineering your system. You “geek out” on your system and lose sight of the point of pursuing productivity in the first place.

Plus, there’s a big gap in resources on productivity that doesn’t involve complex jargons and elaborate diagrams (see the GTD matrix). Typically, this exists in the creative sector. I’m not saying GTD doesn’t work or that it isn’t wonderful. It just doesn’t connect with some people (and makes others want to vomit).

Here are seven of the best, simple, and sometimes seemingly upside down tips for being more prolific.

Create a “to stop” list. If you’re not getting the results you want, chances are you don’t care much about the things you’re doing. The best way to change this is to create a “To-Stop” list. We often spend lots of time creating lists for the things we need to do, but rarely do we reflect on the things that aren’t working. So create a list of all the things that are sucking away your energy and are wasting your time. Figure out which of those things is having the biggest negative impact on you doing the stuff you really want to do. Tackle that thing head on each day.
Focus on short bursts. It’s a bit sad when you realize that the reason most dreams die is because of a lack of focused action. If you’re constantly distracted by the television, surfing the internet, reading blogs, or whatever it is, you’re just dragging your heels. Yet, we think that high levels of focus is something only super-humans can attain. But mental focus is akin to building muscle; it’s something that must be trained with resistance. So figure out how much “mental weight” you can lift, and start from there. Elect to focus for 50 minutes on your most important task, then take a 10 minute break to do whatever you want. Then repeat. If you can’t “lift” 50 minutes, try 20 minutes, or even 10 minutes. Gradually increase your “resistance” (the amount of time you focus) each week.
Define your daily ass-kicking. What is your Something Amazing? Take the time to clearly define your deep reason for moving toward that goal. Now make a post-it note of out of it, or schedule a daily reminder of that deep reason on your email program.
Allow yourself to suck. One of the biggest reasons we avoid doing what we love is that we’re afraid we’re going to fall flat on our face, in front of everyone. And then they’ll laugh or think we’re not amazing and all our theories about how we’re not really a genius will be true. Here’s some good news: You probably won’t be as bad as you thought you were. Here’s some bad news: You’ll never be great unless you first allow yourself to suck. So embrace your suckiness. Don’t let the fear of failure keep you from doing what you love.
Focus on the Three C’s. When it comes down to it, there are three major groups of things we need to do to succeed at whatever it is we want to do. We need to Create, we need to Connect, and we need to Consume. Or in other words, we need to produce/share, build and nurture relationships, and keep ourselves savvy in our field. An imbalance in these areas will stagnate our progress. If we’re always consuming, but never getting our ideas out there, we won’t make any progress toward our goals. If we’re connecting without creating, we’ll have nothing of value to share. And if we’re creating without continually learning, we’ll become outdated. Defining a focus of one of the Three C’s helps us stay focused on our purpose for the day. It also helps us realize that spending time on Twitter and socializing is just as important as creating. It’s all about balance.
Stop caring about things that don’t matter. This advice seems so simple, but it bears repeating. It’s easy to get caught up in obsessing about little tasks and trivialities that aren’t really important. The best way to overcome this habit is to start thinking in terms of long term impact. Every time you start obsessing over the little details, ask yourself how long the results of those tasks will last. If you’re always spending the majority of your time doing tasks that will have little impact after a week or month, you’re always going to be stuck in the same position. Be ruthless about not caring about all the stuff that’s not important. Your life depends on it.
Make it stupidly simple. If you’re struggling to make headway on the stuff you really care about, maybe you’re making it too complicated. Try making a really simple commitment, like working on that “thing you love” for an hour a day. One hour, every day. Don’t commit to finishing it or making it perfect. Just commit to doing that One Thing You Love every day for one hour, for 30 days.
Complex productivity systems aren’t for everyone, and they don’t need to be. Don’t worry if GTD scares you or hurts your brain. You can still get the things done that really matter to you.

Also, I should note a couple of people out there, such as Charlie Gilkey and Mark McGuinness, who are working hard to change the lack of productivity material related to creatives. For further reading and material on this topic, I highly recommended checking out their blogs.

This article was written by Zen Habits contributor Jonathan Mead of Illuminated Mind. To learn more about how to live without limits, grab a subscription to Illuminated Mind.


If you liked this article, please share it on del.icio.us, StumbleUpon or Digg. I’d appreciate it.




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post #115 of 128
Thread Starter 
LOVED THIS!

zen habits
Seven Productivity Tips For People That Hate GTD
Posted: 09 Apr 2009 05:07 PM PDT
Article by Zen Habits contributor Jonathan Mead; follow him on twitter.

Not everone gets GTD (Getting Things Done). I know I didn’t. It made my head spin.

I have nothing against the system or David Allen. I’m sure it must be awesome for some people (that’s why it has all those followers, right?). But for others, it just doesn’t fit. Mostly with creative-minded people.

When it comes to GTD and other systems, it’s often too easy to get into a habit of over-engineering your system. You “geek out” on your system and lose sight of the point of pursuing productivity in the first place.

Plus, there’s a big gap in resources on productivity that doesn’t involve complex jargons and elaborate diagrams (see the GTD matrix). Typically, this exists in the creative sector. I’m not saying GTD doesn’t work or that it isn’t wonderful. It just doesn’t connect with some people (and makes others want to vomit).

Here are seven of the best, simple, and sometimes seemingly upside down tips for being more prolific.

Create a “to stop” list. If you’re not getting the results you want, chances are you don’t care much about the things you’re doing. The best way to change this is to create a “To-Stop” list. We often spend lots of time creating lists for the things we need to do, but rarely do we reflect on the things that aren’t working. So create a list of all the things that are sucking away your energy and are wasting your time. Figure out which of those things is having the biggest negative impact on you doing the stuff you really want to do. Tackle that thing head on each day.
Focus on short bursts. It’s a bit sad when you realize that the reason most dreams die is because of a lack of focused action. If you’re constantly distracted by the television, surfing the internet, reading blogs, or whatever it is, you’re just dragging your heels. Yet, we think that high levels of focus is something only super-humans can attain. But mental focus is akin to building muscle; it’s something that must be trained with resistance. So figure out how much “mental weight” you can lift, and start from there. Elect to focus for 50 minutes on your most important task, then take a 10 minute break to do whatever you want. Then repeat. If you can’t “lift” 50 minutes, try 20 minutes, or even 10 minutes. Gradually increase your “resistance” (the amount of time you focus) each week.
Define your daily ass-kicking. What is your Something Amazing? Take the time to clearly define your deep reason for moving toward that goal. Now make a post-it note of out of it, or schedule a daily reminder of that deep reason on your email program.
Allow yourself to suck. One of the biggest reasons we avoid doing what we love is that we’re afraid we’re going to fall flat on our face, in front of everyone. And then they’ll laugh or think we’re not amazing and all our theories about how we’re not really a genius will be true. Here’s some good news: You probably won’t be as bad as you thought you were. Here’s some bad news: You’ll never be great unless you first allow yourself to suck. So embrace your suckiness. Don’t let the fear of failure keep you from doing what you love.
Focus on the Three C’s. When it comes down to it, there are three major groups of things we need to do to succeed at whatever it is we want to do. We need to Create, we need to Connect, and we need to Consume. Or in other words, we need to produce/share, build and nurture relationships, and keep ourselves savvy in our field. An imbalance in these areas will stagnate our progress. If we’re always consuming, but never getting our ideas out there, we won’t make any progress toward our goals. If we’re connecting without creating, we’ll have nothing of value to share. And if we’re creating without continually learning, we’ll become outdated. Defining a focus of one of the Three C’s helps us stay focused on our purpose for the day. It also helps us realize that spending time on Twitter and socializing is just as important as creating. It’s all about balance.
Stop caring about things that don’t matter. This advice seems so simple, but it bears repeating. It’s easy to get caught up in obsessing about little tasks and trivialities that aren’t really important. The best way to overcome this habit is to start thinking in terms of long term impact. Every time you start obsessing over the little details, ask yourself how long the results of those tasks will last. If you’re always spending the majority of your time doing tasks that will have little impact after a week or month, you’re always going to be stuck in the same position. Be ruthless about not caring about all the stuff that’s not important. Your life depends on it.
Make it stupidly simple. If you’re struggling to make headway on the stuff you really care about, maybe you’re making it too complicated. Try making a really simple commitment, like working on that “thing you love” for an hour a day. One hour, every day. Don’t commit to finishing it or making it perfect. Just commit to doing that One Thing You Love every day for one hour, for 30 days.
Complex productivity systems aren’t for everyone, and they don’t need to be. Don’t worry if GTD scares you or hurts your brain. You can still get the things done that really matter to you.

Also, I should note a couple of people out there, such as Charlie Gilkey and Mark McGuinness, who are working hard to change the lack of productivity material related to creatives. For further reading and material on this topic, I highly recommended checking out their blogs.

This article was written by Zen Habits contributor Jonathan Mead of Illuminated Mind. To learn more about how to live without limits, grab a subscription to Illuminated Mind.


If you liked this article, please share it on del.icio.us, StumbleUpon or Digg. I’d appreciate it.




You are subscribed to email updates from Zen Habits
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.Email delivery powered by Google
Inbox too full? Subscribe to the feed version of Zen Habits in a feed reader.
If you prefer to unsubscribe via postal mail, write to: Zen Habits, c/o Google, 20 W Kinzie, Chicago IL USA 60610
post #116 of 128
Unsticking but bumping so I can find it again! I need to get back on the wagon.

I'm going to be working on Zen To Done this summer.
post #117 of 128
Thread Starter 
recently discovered i am "right-brained." (apparently this means i am ADD or something)

so, i wonder if there is GTD for right brainers????

(since i have failed miserably at GTD)
post #118 of 128
Good question! I just got my inbox to zero only by deleting or archiving everything. (hundreds of emails)
post #119 of 128
Subbing! I too have failed miserably at GTD in the past (and FlyLady, Franklin Covey, and quite a few other "systems"). However, I am going to start homeschooling part-time with ds this fall, and I am reaaaallly feeling the need to get on track with my time management skills. I started another thread here, but I'll be participating in this one too!
post #120 of 128
i've said it before, but i must say it again, for mac users, i love *things* in combination with *ical* and email *to-do's*. i can grab a date from an email a homelearner might send me, for a field trip, it automatically creates a date in ical and i can set an alarm to remind me. if i get an email from my sister in canada with an amount i owe her for something, i can highlight the sentence, click on the 'to do' icon, and it will create a to-do item that will auto-synch with ical - i can set a priority and reminder for that. physically i have a 'file' folder and an 'act' folder on my desk, the trick is that i need to follow my regularly scheduled reminder to gtd 'review' - in other words, go through those folders and go through all of *things* to see what needs doing.

now i've started sleeping at night i'm finding it easier to follow my flylady morning + evening routines, which i have ical email to me and delete once i've done them. i've also scheduled into ical reminders of what my day is and made daily instead of weekly zones, like flylady. mondays is my day to mind the bedroom and do special projects...we keep our library books in there so i know to gather up those for our library afternoon. tuesdays is our food delivery and so i do detailed cleaning + special projects in the kitchen. wednesdays is my 'weekly cleaning hour' and i focus a bit more on the bathroom, detail cleaning. thursdays is my living/dining room area, fridays is the studio, saturday is too busy with football/soccer and family...and sundays is the garden. i'm also finding it easier just to *always* practice at least one yoga pose, which usually leads to more, and also easier to include a load of laundry on weekdays in my morning routine. since i sorted into colours (again! why does that get out of control?) it isn't a major event to throw a load in.

this is working right now as i'm energetic and my girls are happy, we are between trips, and no one is sick. otherwise i'm afraid it falls apart!

the girls also have their routines, on paper, morning + evening.

the thing i am missing is a financial routine, including filing receipts for my partner's business, and somehow making a link between the spending plan i've made and how to actually use it!! i'd love some advice, ideas, other folks experience here! in detail!

i have a new sitter starting next week : so i hope to add my own work (art practice) into the mix, which probably will mean something will fall out the bottom, but you never know!

*
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