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The Thyroid Thread (Part II) - Page 4

post #61 of 862
Thread Starter 
The possible plantar fasciitis/undertreated hypothyroidism link is really interesting to me. My hypothyroidism is being treated, but I have been thinking that my dosage is too low. I had never heard of plantar fasciitis until this thread.....but that's exactly what I have been experiencing for the last month or so!!! I thought I had stepped on one of the toys that are all over the floor and it was bruised and not healing very fast. But since my heel is very sore when I wake in the morning and after I have been sitting for too long (thanks to my MDC and Guild Wards addictions! ) I think it's probably plantar fasciitis. I guess it's time to have my bloodwork re-done and probably increase my dosage.
post #62 of 862

What Jessica said goes here too. I'd never heard of it but after looking it up I went "Wow. There's a name for it!"
Chalk me up as one more with plantar fascitis symptoms.
*walks away muttering about stupid doctors again*
post #63 of 862
I got another lab result back and have an appt. with a endocrinologist for a consult (my dr mentioned she didn't think it warrented replacement hormone meds).

I just have a second to post, maybe I should post all/more of the lab work.
Anyways the total T3 level came back at 80, low (normal range 87-178).

I decided to get tested for Lyme since they were drawing blood and that came back negative. So that was good news.

Jessica
post #64 of 862
I have an odd question. Does anyone else notice being unable to focus their eyes very well if their medication is too low?
post #65 of 862
I have had lousy vision forever, but I think I've heard other people mention vision problems as a symptom, I just don't remember what kind of problems they were.
post #66 of 862

Med question

I've asked for a prescription for Armour - and asked to start at 1 grain (as it seems from what I've read that is a good starting place - did I go to far here?). Message from the med assistant was that this was a much, MUCH higher dose than HCP was going to prescribe of synthroid and that this drug can be toxic very quickly. So...

I'm getting a 'low dose' of synthroid - or the generic form I guess.

Should I at this point just be thankful I'm getting a script at all? So far she has only wanted to treat my fatigue issue as a sleep issue (and it really is a sleep issue I think...but totally related to my thyroid) but is willing to go low dose synthroid to appease me. <-- my words not here.

As a refresher: Large thyroid, generous nodule, doubled TSH in less than a year but still w/in normal range, many vague/not so vague physical symptoms

I'm still in the process of trying to find a endo to be referred to. How does one really choose someone who will treat the patient and not the labs? I cannot switch primary care docs right now (HMO) so must go to a specialist and I fear there is not an endo in town that will treat me how I want to be treated.

~L.
post #67 of 862

New-- help with test results

Hi! I have been trying to sort through the enormous amount of information that has been amassed here but I was hoping someone could possibly help me wrap my mind around some things. For years now I have had symptoms of hypothyroidism but my TSH levels have always come back normal and that has been the end of it. At the dr.'s the other day I mentioned my suspicion and that no one has ever run the other tests, just the TSH. I called today to get the results and my TSH was 0.57 and my Free T4 was 0.81. I have no idea why she chose to run just those two and not a whole panel. She seems to be suspecting PCOS and I have an ultrasound scheduled for next week. Can anyone make heads or tails out of this? I don't even know what to ask for, my head is just spinning! Thank you!!!
post #68 of 862
I happened upon this older post and found it very informative.


Pat

Quote:
NUTRITION AND HYPOTHYROIDISM

Selenium
Together with Iodine, the most important mineral for thyroid function. Best food source is Brazil nuts which are quite high.

Quote:
Selenium activates an enzyme - hepatic type I iodothyronine deiodinase - that is responsible for controlling thyroid function by the conversion of T4 to T3. This enzyme... is sensitive to selenium deficiency.

Some researchers and practitioners are beginning to believe that selenium deficiency alone can trigger autoimmune thyroid disease.

Keep intake 200-400mcg/day.

(from Mary Shomon's book)
Wonder how many Hypos are actually just selenium deficient?

Or hypos on medication that do not see a relief in symptoms are simply selenium (and iodine) deficient?

Iodine
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...&postcount=272

Vitamin A

A deficiency in vit. A can inhibit thyroid hormone production.
http://www.ithyroid.com/vitamin_a.htm

High vitamin cod liver oil is best source. www.westonaprice.org

Personally I would take a larger dosage than 10,000 IU (1 tsp/day) unless on a traditional diet that supplies a lot of other sources of A. Traditional diets contained an average of 50,000 IU of A/day. As with any nutrient, I'm finding if you are deficient, you need much more than even optimal amounts to restock your body stores.


B Vitamins

Many Bs are critical for thyroid function including B2, Niacin, B6 (which helps convert iodine to thyroid hormone) and B12. They are also highly correlated with mood and very much depleted in stressful times.

Food sources are best. I take both desiccated liver www.drrons.com and brewer's yeast http://www.lewis-labs.com/products/brewersyeast.htm

Vitamin D

Quote:
...necessary in order for the pituitary gland to produce thyroid hormone and may play a role in T3 binding to its receptor. Vitamin D is part of the necessary supporting apparatus that enables the deiodinase enzyme to convert T4 into T3. (from Mary Shomon's book "Living Well with Hypothryoidism"
Many many people are vitamin D deficient. Mercola, Krispin Sullivan and the Weston Price foundation have good information on this. Studies show that during winter people need 10x the RDA of D to keep their blood levels up! (And most fascinating to me is that this was likely the amount that traditional diets contained also.)

The best thing to do is test your blood levels and get a 25 (OH) D test. You should be in high normal range. If you do supplement vitamin D, get a natural form made from cod liver oil, this is very important. The D2 vegan form is toxic. I've used Carlson's natural D pills before but high vitamin cod liver oil will give you both best source of A and D. Radiant Life or Blue Ice.


Zinc

Another essential mineral and involved in T3 conversion. Essential depression fighting nutrient as well (see Amanda Rose's website).

Magnesium

After reading about how critical it is, and how depleted our soils are (and thus our food) I think everyone needs to supplement magnesium. Low mag. also reduces T4. Best food sources are nuts and seeds and homemade bone broths.

http://www.krispin.com/magnes.html
http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/magnesium.htm

Tyrosine
The thyroid hormones T3 and T4 refers to the amino acid tyrosine bound with 3 molecules of iodine or 4 molecules of iodine... it's critical. One can be deficient in amino acids for many reasons: not eating enough protein. Or interestingly enough, a high simple carb diet: if you are raising your blood sugar several times throughout the day, beneficial amino acids get sweeped out of your bloodstream by insulin as well as the excess sugar.

More on that in The Mood Cure by Julia Ross, a protein defiency is the true reason for low seratonin in the brain ... not a lack of SSRI's! I also know that adaquate *digestion* of proteins into their individual building blocks, amino acids, with good amounts of stomach acid is essential for this to happen as well. Tums and other acid inhibitors cause a multitude of other problems.

The other key to all of this is the fact that low thyroid inihibits your digestive function as it inhibits many enzyme reactions throughout the body. If your digestion is not working well, you can't absorb your nutrients well either!

Enzyme inhibition also results in such wide ranging symptoms as constipation and dry hair/skin... the blocking of creating certain essential fatty acids because the enzymes to do so aren't working is one reason why evening primrose oil is recommended.

JaneS.
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...&postcount=285
post #69 of 862
Thank you Pat!

A question for you (or anyone else who might know)

How would you discover a deficiency in any of the things mentioned in the post? Lab work? An assumption that if your thyroid is out of whack these vitamins/minerals must be too? Or because the American diet is in general pretty crappy - we all need extra vit/minerals?

Can I make changes to my diet while getting started on traditional meds and then when I feel as though I've pumped up on vit/minerals trial off the meds?

~L.
post #70 of 862
Quote:
How would you discover a deficiency in any of the things mentioned in the post? Lab work? An assumption that if your thyroid is out of whack these vitamins/minerals must be too? Or because the American diet is in general pretty crappy - we all need extra vit/minerals?
I went on the assumption that it was true, tried the vit/min route (supplements) and felt a lot better in about 2 weeks. I think testing for some of these isn't particularly mainstream and I don't know if it's possible for them all--I was at the point that I just needed to feel better and was willing to jump in (after doing as much reading as I could stand).

It's not just the typical American diet--though it's good to start asking why and how this could happen. Some people have a lot of gut damage and aren't absorbing the nutrients from their food well, so doing gut healing in conjunction with other stuff would be key. For me, it was a combo of bad diet and the effect of the mercury from my amalgam fillings. Many mercury toxic people have thyroid problems. I'm sure there are other things that could be in play, I just know my little corner of the world.


Quote:
Can I make changes to my diet while getting started on traditional meds and then when I feel as though I've pumped up on vit/minerals trial off the meds?
I would say yes, but I'd also say that I was taking doses of these way higher than I could get from food (well, admittedly I wasn't willing to eat oysters (for zinc) every day--I have heard of people doing this with just food, but it's a very challenging way to go). It's a long-term deficiency that's been building and IME it will take a long time to rebuild. If you are on meds (I finally got a prescription just when I'd decided to try the vit/min route so I never filled it--but it was really satisfying to get it ) but you'd need to monitor how you feel closely and be willing to taper down on your dosage. Read about the symptoms of hyperthyroid because you may feel hyper as your thyroid starts working again.
post #71 of 862
http://www.tuberose.com/
Has good descriptions (imo, though rather technical and long) of how the adrenals and thyroid work and what their role is in the body.
Posting it here (finally) so I don't lose it again.
post #72 of 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by llnmaw View Post
Thank you Pat!

A question for you (or anyone else who might know)

How would you discover a deficiency in any of the things mentioned in the post? Lab work? An assumption that if your thyroid is out of whack these vitamins/minerals must be too? Or because the American diet is in general pretty crappy - we all need extra vit/minerals?

Can I make changes to my diet while getting started on traditional meds and then when I feel as though I've pumped up on vit/minerals trial off the meds?

~L.
I always recommend whole foods for nutritional support. Check the site "World's Healthiest Foods". It lists each of those nutrients and the foods most dense with that nutrient. http://www.whfoods.com/nutrientstoc.php

Also, I'd suggest saliva testing of the interconnected hormones: thyroid, cortisol, progesterone, estrogen and testosterone. This post has more info about this: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...n#post11781897

Most of our diets are depleted in magnesium. We use Natural Calm. It is most bio-available. You want magnesium citrate. We also supplement with CLO for Vit A and Omega 3. I eat my two Brazil nuts (maximum, cause more can be too much selenium). And other food sources for the nutrients.


HTH, Pat
post #73 of 862
Here's my story. I've had mild symptoms of hypothyroid for years. In December 2007 my levels were done and my TSH was 2.19. I started lithium in January, which is known for causing hypothyroidism, and severe symptoms of hypothyroid started in April 2008. Here is the list I made:
1.severe fatigue
2.a huge weight gain of 25 lbs in less than 3 months despite not changing eating habits at all
3.depression despite proper treatment for bipolar disorder
4.headaches
5.dry skin
6.extreme hair loss (lost half of hair volume in less than 3 months)
7.difficulty tolerating cold
8.lower body temperature (average around 97.4-97.7 mid-afternoon which is much lower than normal for me)
9.hoarseness of voice – constant
10. high cholesterol
11.itchy skin and rashes
12.fuzzy thinking

In May 2008 they took my levels again and they were at 5.01. At this point they said my thyroid was slightly enlarged and sent me for an ultrasound. The ultrasound was done in June and showed two small nodules on my thyroid and a slightly enlarged gland. In July they did blood work again and TSH was at 4.7. In August I had a thyroid scan (I am nursing a 2 year old but I felt okay with a technetium scan - I declined the uptake scan). They've never really given me the results of that, other than to say I need another one in 6 months. So I have major, major symptoms of hypothyroidism but they are saying since the levels are "normal" (less than or close to 5) then I don't have hypothyroidism. I don't have a family doctor so today I am going back to the walk-in clinic that has been treating me and taking all my blood work from the last 9 months and a list of all my symptoms and other issues and seeing if I can get them to treat my hypothyroid. I am also going to ask for a referral to an endicrinologist. Unfortunately I am in Ontario so we don't have a lot of say in our health care so if they say no, them I am out of luck. I had to withdraw from school (I'm in university) because the fatigue and weakness is so bad and I couldn't even get medical leave because the damn doctors won't admit there's a problem! Hopefully I'll be back with a happy update.
post #74 of 862
Hi all. I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto's. It was only after I BEGGED my primary to test me for something and everything. I have been ill for a long time. major allergies, heart palpitations or pvc's and severe joint pain in my hands. I have just done the salivary cortisol tests and the results show adrenal fatigue. My ND thinks the adrenal fatigue is what's causing the hashimoto's. Hoping to get back in the swing of things. It sucks to be SO incredibly tired when your 4 year old just wants to play
post #75 of 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by onelittleone View Post
Hi all. I was recently diagnosed with Hashimoto's. It was only after I BEGGED my primary to test me for something and everything. I have been ill for a long time. major allergies, heart palpitations or pvc's and severe joint pain in my hands. I have just done the salivary cortisol tests and the results show adrenal fatigue. My ND thinks the adrenal fatigue is what's causing the hashimoto's. Hoping to get back in the swing of things. It sucks to be SO incredibly tired when your 4 year old just wants to play
AF can cause Hashimoto's?
Can you point me to some studies on that or something?
post #76 of 862
Quote:
AF can cause Hashimoto's?
Can you point me to some studies on that or something?
I don't have studies, but my understanding is that when one is stressed and underperforming (either adrenals or thyroid) the other tries to compensate and eventually you'll often start seeing symptoms of the other (AF or hypo).
post #77 of 862
Hi all!

I'm just jumping in to ask a quick question that I can't seem to find the answer for. My DW had hyperthyroidism and had the radioactive iodine to stop the function a few years ago. So, now she has no thyroid and is taking the medication. I've read that you can't take the meds while pregnant, so how would that work if she ever decided to get pregnant? Is there a thyroid medication that you can take while pregnant? She couldn't be on nothing, right? Thanks for any help you have.
post #78 of 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monarchgrrl View Post
Hi all!

I'm just jumping in to ask a quick question that I can't seem to find the answer for. My DW had hyperthyroidism and had the radioactive iodine to stop the function a few years ago. So, now she has no thyroid and is taking the medication. I've read that you can't take the meds while pregnant, so how would that work if she ever decided to get pregnant? Is there a thyroid medication that you can take while pregnant? She couldn't be on nothing, right? Thanks for any help you have.
I believe the medication you can't take while pregnant is the medication for hyperthyroidism/Graves'. Now that your DW has no thyroid, she would be classed as hypothyroid as she doesn't produce any thyroid hormone and that medication (thyroid hormone) is safe and absolutely necessary during pregnancy. In fact, they will likely increase that medication during pregnancy to avoid what is called "cretinism" in the baby.
post #79 of 862
Quote:
Originally Posted by TanyaLopez View Post
I don't have studies, but my understanding is that when one is stressed and underperforming (either adrenals or thyroid) the other tries to compensate and eventually you'll often start seeing symptoms of the other (AF or hypo).
Ah okay, I remember that now.
I switched to natural thyroid (NatureThroid) not long ago and my dose isn't high enough yet so I'm having some memory issues atm. Thanks for humoring me.
post #80 of 862

Headaches?

Did you get one when starting Synthroid - or it's generic? If so did you push through it and wind up being able to tolerate it? (it does not seem wise really...but wondering)

I started on 5mg of the generic for Synthroid on Sunday AM. By Sunday evening I thought I was coming down with a cold. By Tuesday it felt more flu like and for the last 3 days I've had the mother of all headaches. My last dose was Wednesday morning and finally after a nap this afternoon my headache is almost %100 gone. I NEVER EVER....EVER have a headache that I cannot cure with a dose or two of motrin. Occasionally decongestant comes into play if the first motrin does not do it ( know it's evil stuff...).

I have the same reaction when I try to take a multi-vitamin too. So I don't.

I plan to stay off the med for a week and trial it again, only not waiting until I feel quite so horrible to quit. Just want to be sure it was the med....ya know?

I'm disgusted that something I had to practically beg for is not going to be tolerated!

Guess I really do need to do some further research on vit/minerals....
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