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I've noticed a trend in friends' houses - Page 2

post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightheart View Post
I found myself buying something used at a thrift or yard-sale or having it give to me for free that 'will work' but not really what I really wanted... it's useful and it's serving a purpose, but not really what I would of chosen 1st if my frugality and environmentality didn't stand in the way...

Perfect example is the small hot pink plastic crate in the bathroom, I have no idea where it really came from, I know I didn't buy it new... it has held so many different things over the years from kitchen stuff, office stuff, sewing stuff... now it's holding my hair scrunchies... do I really want a hot pink piece of plastic in my bathroom? No, Did I want that hot pink piece of plastic in the kitchen, or the office or my sewing space? No, that's the reason it's not still in any of those places... Why do I keep it? well, it's a nice little rectangular crate that can hold a bunch of different small items all in one spot... useful, but.....
That's so me! I have the "case" boxes I bought babywipes in when dd was little. They are just cardboard boxes. I could recycle them... but then I would have to buy/find something to hold all of dd's toys. Someone just gave me the most awesome vinyl tablecloth that I'm just going to hot glue to the boxes. Should add another year or two to their lives. I'd LOVE to have a wooden case of some sort for the toys, but those darned ugly cardboard boxes are just the right size for... everything
post #22 of 36
I really think that Crayfish has made some great points. I am really struggling with this because when I live in a smallish home (1000 sf for a family of 4 with no garage/basement/shed/storage locker) and I have to make ruthless decisions to make it work and look nice. I've gotten rid of almost all the furniture that I had when I moved in here (donated, not trashed ) because it just doesn't work with the style of the home and the space. I've bought some new stuff specifically to work with areas with design challenges in the home and I'm planning to buy more. At some point the alternative is moving to a much larger home that not only would involve more embodied energy and materials and ongoing energy use, but also much increased car usage (because larger homes that would could afford are further from the city centre). So in my mind, buying new stuff and donating/freecycling stuff that doesn't work for me any more is the lesser of two evils, environmentally. Keep in mind that I am 40 and I don't want to live like a student any more . My home is very casual, but I spend a lot of time here working and mothering and I want it to be a pleasure to spend time in.
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by amyamanda View Post
But darnit, I want a tidy, matching, uncluttery house, too! And I don't want to give up my ideals, my frugal tendencies, my distaste for adding to landfills.
I think that finding homes for items you don't need any more takes care of the landfill issue. The tidy matching thing -- you can accomplish miracles with paint and fabric. Paint all your thrift store stuff white or a colour that you love. Pick a colour scheme and make a fabric cover for anything that doesn't work with your colour scheme. I think it is do-able. Being green doesn't mean living in a warehouse of stuff IMO .
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by barose View Post
I guess I’m in the middle. We don’t buy much for the house, (we have all we need) but I have things I have no guilt getting rid of to give me some sanity. Everything I get rid of I try to do it responsibly: Giving away, Freecycle, we have a charity that come by 3x a year, recycling electronic items responsibly, and so on even if it takes more work than just tossing a broken waffle iron in the trash.

Whatever we get for the house, we make sure that its worth it regardless if its $2000 or free off Craigslist.
and

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barcino
My house is pretty tidy and uncluttered... I find that I buy less but I buy high quality and that reduces my wanting to get rid of it or having the need to find something that needs to replace something. When I buy used or something that is a "deal" half the time I found myself buying something that I did not really like - and it was a waste because that was bound to not be needed or not liked. Anyway I find that I rather spend money on something that I truly love than on something that is a deal if I do not like it. If I can find an item that is a deal and I love then by all means I buy it but only if I truly love it and need it. Some of my green friends buy it simply because it is recycled, a good deal and to them that = frugal. That to me is not frugal at all - I guess we have different definitions

These are me.

To the OP - I sound like your friends, but I would never just toss something away into the garbage. That makes me cringe just thinking about it. I do buy what I love, regardless of price, and don't mind getting rid of what I don't love (I simply donate). I also have a large house and quite a bit of it is empty at the moment because, again, I won't buy something just to fill it, what a waste. If my windows stay bare until I find the perfect curtains, so be it. I'd much rather wait than buy something just to get rid of it later.
post #25 of 36
I think you're going to have to give yourself a little bit of permission to spend some money eventually if you want a totally uncluttered home. I think when you declutter you will eventually throw something out you decide you'd like back later on. However, I'm talking about less than 1% of the stuff, and when you do buy it back, most likely you'll spend less than you spent in the first place because it's either gotten cheaper over the years or you are a better shopper now.

The peace of mind you gain from decluttering, however, is worth a ton more than what you'll end up re-spending. Plus, most people will discover that they actually learn to live with less things and totally get rid of the shopping for entertainment instinct, and that saves them money in the long run.

That's just my $.02. It really did used to bother me when I'd end up rebuying a thing or two after I'd decluttered. Nowadays, it doesn't because I realize I've gained a lot from not having clutter, if there's a small real cost involved with that, so be it. (And, I'm talking a very small cost, maybe I've spent $20 or $30 replacing a few random things that got thrown out over the years.)
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by thixle View Post
That's so me! I have the "case" boxes I bought babywipes in when dd was little. They are just cardboard boxes. I could recycle them... but then I would have to buy/find something to hold all of dd's toys. Someone just gave me the most awesome vinyl tablecloth that I'm just going to hot glue to the boxes. Should add another year or two to their lives. I'd LOVE to have a wooden case of some sort for the toys, but those darned ugly cardboard boxes are just the right size for... everything
I love my heavy cardboard boxes but I hate the ugly, so I decoupaged some, contact papered some, and covered a few in plain bown paper with clear packing tape over the corners and bottom depending on what it was repurposed to be. Very easy
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrabbit View Post
And, for some reason that completely escapes me, they have NO GUILT about it. What's up with that?
Sorry if this is OT, but has anyone seen the credit card commercial (I don't know which one) that says something like "We are a consumable society. And that's okay."



It's like *they* know, and are assuring all the non-thinking mindless masses that its okay, before they realize it one way or another and question that way of life.

:
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by MonkeyPrincess View Post
Sorry if this is OT, but has anyone seen the credit card commercial (I don't know which one) that says something like "We are a consumable society. And that's okay."



It's like *they* know, and are assuring all the non-thinking mindless masses that its okay, before they realize it one way or another and question that way of life.

:
I sooo agree
post #29 of 36
I'm a little late to the conversation here, but I love this thread, and this board.

Just wanted to add, I got a phone call from Old Navy yesterday, inviting me to come in and "stuff" my bag. Totally irritated me. I try not to go into Old Navy any more. The prices are irresistable, and I always used to get more than I needed. Now it's only socks. Pretty much.
post #30 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Think of Winter View Post
Just wanted to add, I got a phone call from Old Navy yesterday, inviting me to come in and "stuff" my bag.
Me too! And as I type, Lane Bryant is leaving me a message too. I guess I'm not spending enough money in those stores any more and they are calling me, begging me to come out and shop!
post #31 of 36
I think you can have both

IF

you have a garage or shed to store everything away out of sight that you want to hold on to

(that's my method!)
post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by SarahGuinn View Post
We are a thrift store/freecycle/craigslist free/side of the street shopper family and we have no problem redonating things that we aren't using anymore.
This is exactly what we do! (I got all my matching dishes for my open cabinet at a thrift store.) I have no problem getting rid of things, especially if someone else can use them. I have a donation box that gets filled regularly but it gets emptied regularly too because we are ALWAYS going to the thrift store: (in fact I think we will go today)
post #33 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Think of Winter View Post
I'm a little late to the conversation here, but I love this thread, and this board.

Just wanted to add, I got a phone call from Old Navy yesterday, inviting me to come in and "stuff" my bag. Totally irritated me. I try not to go into Old Navy any more. The prices are irresistable, and I always used to get more than I needed. Now it's only socks. Pretty much.
Bloomingdales calls me too! (but I asked them to) I dont buy a lot of clothes (because my taste is bigger than my wallet) so it easy to keep my spending and clutter in check if I only feel comfortable buying one or three key pieces a season. I also go through my closet about every six months to see if there is anything I should take to the conignment store, Ebay or give away.

In the past, buying cheap clothes = too much clutter especially if they wear out within months or weeks (as Old Navy clothes do to me) and I end up wearing them in the house only. I dont need 30 'round-the-house' shirts.
post #34 of 36
I've noticed the same thing!
post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by lightheart View Post
I found myself buying something used at a thrift or yard-sale or having it give to me for free that 'will work' but not really what I really wanted... it's useful and it's serving a purpose, but not really what I would of chosen 1st if my frugality and environmentality didn't stand in the way...
yes, i was going to say something along these lines. Because i have always been an environmentalist w/ no money, i always took what i could find that was cheap and fit the bill...sometimes i loved it too, but most of the time i settled for what i could get. but now that i'm older, i think i'm ready to hold off until i can get what i really want. I don't mind buying new if it is exactly what i'm looking for, and know that i'll be keeping it forever. that being said, i always check used, consignment, or antique shops first.

i'm ready to live in a home that is asthetically pleasing to me. It's good for my soul. just because someplace is neat and tidy and uncluttered does not mean that it's pleasing or soothing to me.
post #36 of 36
You can initiate the "one thing in, one thing out" rule without adding to the landfill. It means that you donate something every time you buy something new, rather than throwing things away. We recycle a lot of empty food containers rather than throwing them out- but little else can really be recycled around here. I also have zero guilt throwing out empty packaging as soon as an item is opened up, or broken toys as soon as they break (if its' not fixable). I make every effort to minimize the inflow (I'll seek out products with less packaging in the first place) but once the garbage is in my home, I don't feel guilty for throwing it out. I also keep a running "thrift store bag" that we add to as needed.

I love shopping thrift stores- in fact, I've got a huge pile of stuff to go out, but I want to wait until PMS bloating is gone before dumping it so I can go shopping while I'm there.

I won't even spend $1 on an item that I have no use for, or clothing I won't wear. I don't bring things into my home that I don't need (not that the kids never do....)

My health is the biggest challenge to being tidy. Theoretically we could have done a lot of decluttering today but I lacked the energy to move. It's an ongoing process. I can't live in the modern world and completely stop the inflow of stuff, so the outflow needs to be steady as well.
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