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what names are you coming up with? - Page 5

post #81 of 164
Woohoo, my husband likes the name Soren. What does good with that one? My husband is french and our last name is a longish french name.

So far today, the names are

Soren_______
or
Ava Rose
post #82 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaoticzenmom View Post
Woohoo, my husband likes the name Soren. What does good with that one? My husband is french and our last name is a longish french name.

So far today, the names are

Soren_______
or
Ava Rose
That's a toughie, because you have to avoid it sounding smushed, like, "Sore In <something>" you know? Or is it pronounced differently?

I'd pair it with something a little more traditional or slightly more familiar maybe, since it's a very uncommon name. What about Michael or Matthew? For some reason I think it would go well with an M_ name. But it's a hard one, for sure.

Hopefully someone else can help you more. You can play around on www.nymbler.com too for some inspiration.

Good luck!
post #83 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaoticzenmom View Post
Woohoo, my husband likes the name Soren. What does good with that one? My husband is french and our last name is a longish french name.

So far today, the names are

Soren_______
or
Ava Rose
I have a boy named Soren. Named after Kierkegaard. I love, love, love the name. It is shooting up the name charts, so I'm a little worried. When we considered it for dd, it wasn't on the top 1000. When our boy came along, it was somewhere like 900. It's up to 746 now! That's among some pretty common names. I've run into 3 Sorens in our city, all younger than mine.

We used the middle name Isaac. So, if his name was not one he liked, he has another one. I like the hard n followed by the vowel.

Quote:
That's a toughie, because you have to avoid it sounding smushed, like, "Sore In <something>" you know? Or is it pronounced differently?

I'd pair it with something a little more traditional or slightly more familiar maybe, since it's a very uncommon name. What about Michael or Matthew? For some reason I think it would go well with an M_ name. But it's a hard one, for sure.
Yeah, something to consider. My dad does make jokes about his name being Sore and bruised or Sore end. When it's pronounced in Danish, it actually has more of a Z sound or a Zur-en, kind of with the emphasis on the -en part. We say it like our Danish friends did, an English version, but we do put the emphasis on the -en. That helps take away the "sore" or "soarin'" references.

I wouldn't follow an n with an m name. That would be difficult to say, especially during those times you need to use both their names.
post #84 of 164
Soren Xavier? A good French middle name ...
post #85 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by starling&diesel View Post
Soren Xavier? A good French middle name ...
That one sounds great! We'd use Isaac, but it's my other son's middle name. I guess people have name tastes.LOL

I'd never heard of Soren before, but a few years ago, there was boy in my son's class named that and I have liked it since. In 2000, there were more boys named Baby then Soren!LOL

I loved the name Sadie until I told my cousin (a huge Beatles fan) that it was on our list and he started singing "Sexy Sadie" by one of the Beatles. Then, he had to go find it in his cd stash and play it for me. Naming is soo hard!

Lisa
post #86 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by juliebelle View Post
instead of a good cowboy name...dh has to approve of a boys name as a star quarterback being called out over the loud speaker...LOL!
My cousin had this issue. His 2 year old is named Logan Thomas because he loved the idea of "L.T." for a quarterback.
post #87 of 164
Courtney, what is Nia? It has a really nice sound to it.

Hawk is the nickname of a long-distance friend of ours. He's from Iceland and his given name is Haukur. I actually prefer the full name, but neither DH nor I have any ties to Iceland, so we'd be 'stealing' it.

My heritage is half Dutch, and a mix of Scottish, Irish and English. DH is 1/4 Norwegian, 1/4 Swede, plus Native American, black (Africa? Island?), and a smattering of random European. Basically, we're mutts. I 'look' Dutch with red hair and you can pretty much see all of DH's heritage in various features.

Do you guys consider that stuff when naming, or just ignore it?
post #88 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by justKate View Post
My cousin had this issue. His 2 year old is named Logan Thomas because he loved the idea of "L.T." for a quarterback.
uh yea...we have a J.D.
post #89 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Past_VNE View Post
Do you guys consider that stuff [heritage] when naming, or just ignore it?
We absolutely do consider it. Our heritage is mostly English, as is our surname, so we tend to go with that. With our first child, we also considered other names that linked to our other heritages-- French, Swedish, etc. But to choose a name that we have no heritage connection to, would feel, to me, to be disrespectful to the culture or history of the name.
post #90 of 164
Right now I'm leaning toward Clover for a girl and Cedar for a boy...

I'm sure they will both be nixed by Dh...
post #91 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Past_VNE View Post

Do you guys consider that stuff when naming, or just ignore it?
Oh absolutely. It's a huge part, actually. I would not feel comfortable at all using a name from a heritage that wasn't part of ours. I agree with LionTigerBear: it feels disrespectful to people of that heritage, to me. I just can't do it. But I have such anal criteria anyway for names, it's really quite remarkable Guinevere was ever actually named, I think.

But family heritage is definitely a huge part, for sure. I'm Scottish, Welsh, Cherokee, and a tad bit of Dutch and French. My husband is German, Italian, and French Creole (or Cajun French. I forget which is the proper term; their ancestors were Frenchmen who settled in New Orleans) -- mostly German and Italian.

Our last name is very German, so I wouldn't feel comfy using a Cherokee name, for instance, even though that's part of my heritage. It isn't part of my husband's and (more importantly) would sound so off with a German last name, that makes any Cherokee names unusable. So we're sticking with primarily British ones for first names, but a bit of leeway on middle names.

The name Guinevere is Welsh, as is Cordelia (Welsh/English), and Mina (Winnie's middle name) is in honor of a family name (Wilhelmina) and Cordelia is a family name, so those are big things too.

Other criteria that are equally important:

- Has to be very uncommon (preferably not in top 1000) because our last name is very ugly (shhh don't tell mr. nighten I said that) and I don't want her to be known more for her last name than first.
- But it has to be a familiar name so there isn't an explanation required on pronunciation or history with every introduction.
- Has to be long and obviously feminine. No unisex names. Nothing short (our LN is very short and abrupt).
- Has to lend itself to a variety of nicknames (because mine doesn't and that always bugged me).
- Has to be literary and/or have a family history -- this can work with the first or middle name, but have to have both connections there somehow.
- Have to have at least two potential full names before birth, because I'm not comfortable officially naming a baby until I've met her.

And that's just the "must-haves"; that's not even counting the "would be nice" bits.

Middle names are much looser for me. I'm okay with using something that might normally be more nickname-ish (like Mina, although it's actually a legit Arabic name I believe, but our use is from Wilhelmina), or less formal, or a surname for a second middle name, etc. But first names? Definitely lots of requirements there. It's a good thing we've got nine months. Lord knows we'll use the whole time.
post #92 of 164
My cousin actually named his daughter Soren. I'd never heard it before that.
post #93 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Past_VNE View Post
Basically, we're mutts. I 'look' Dutch with red hair and you can pretty much see all of DH's heritage in various features.

Do you guys consider that stuff when naming, or just ignore it?
I'm a mutt too, so I don't give it much thought. Lots of adoptions in my family and lying on the part of the older people in Huz's family.... The Italians shortened their name to Musso out of shame for the longer version, and the Martinez's pretend to be Spanish rather than Mexican.

We (unfortunately) share a last name with a very long running TV show, so like Nighten said,

Quote:
- Has to be very uncommon (preferably not in top 1000) because our last name is very ugly (shhh don't tell mr. nighten I said that) and I don't want her to be known more for her last name than first.
This is really difficult!!
post #94 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by justKate View Post

We (unfortunately) share a last name with a very long running TV show, so like Nighten said,

<quote>

This is really difficult!!
A couple things that have helped me are my grandmother's family book -- which is a real goldmine in terms of family names (and there are some real whoppers too -- I've even got an Obedience Dutiful Bugg way back when on granny's side), talking to my mom and other relatives to put together a list of family names from their side of the family, same with my husband's family, checking out name books from other countries that are part of our heritage, and spending way too much time on these sites:

http://www.behindthename.com/usage.php
http://www.nymbler.com/
http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/babynames/

Granted, Nymbler has a lot of downright made-up names (or ones with bizarre spellings, etc.) but it's a great place to get some ideas or inspiration from (and waste a LOT of time ). BTN also includes some recently coined names ("modern usage" I think it says, or something similar), but it's a good resource for names that are tied to specific geographical areas and so on.

And I've also taken to looking up very old Social Security top 1000 lists too lately, just for some ideas. Cordelia's not on the top 1000 list currently, nor has it been since 1950. But it was fairly popular (thus it being a fairly common family name for us) back in the early 1910s, etc. So looking at the lists from back in those days can also give some inspiration maybe for an uncommon, yet not unfamiliar name, if that's part of what you're looking for too. You can search by name, decade, year, and/or location, and so forth. It's really cool.

Plus it's fun.
post #95 of 164
Sofia Aurelia

and

Solis Nevarro
post #96 of 164
Nighten, thanks for the links.
post #97 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by BathrobeGoddess View Post
Right now I'm leaning toward Clover for a girl and Cedar for a boy...

I'm sure they will both be nixed by Dh...
Those are two of my favourite names! But DP nixed them both. I love, love, love Cedar as a name, for a boy or a girl.

As for looking to our heritage ... I'm Scottish-Canadian going back to the dark ages and DP is French-Metis-Canadian going back just as far. We're leaning toward a French first name to go along with our French last name, with maybe a Scottish name in the middle. But to be honest, three French names sound better in a row. We will be moving to a Quebecois town, so whatever we name the baby has to work 'en Francais'. So some of my ideas for Scottishy names would be a little warped. Like Edith would sound like "E-dit" and "Lauchlan" would sound like "La-Clenn" which kind of messes with them.
post #98 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thursday Girl View Post
I am still trying to find a middle name for Jude (girl). I also keep going back to Cady Charlotte, but DD REALLY wants to name her Jude.
Although I adore both names, Cady and Charlotte, when they are put together I think of Katy Scarlett... from Gone With the Wind.
post #99 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Past_VNE View Post
Do you guys consider that stuff when naming, or just ignore it?
We do. Though it's the opposite for us - I'm not concerned about exploiting the dominant culture, I feel the need to assert my own. Even though I love a lot of names, I can't really bring myself to use a name that isn't explicitly Jewish. Also I have a strong family tradition of naming babies after dead family members, so that gives me a direction. My grandmother was one of seven kids and all but one other died in the Holocaust, so you'd think there would be a lot to work with, but they were all named German secular names from the time (Lisl, Rosl, Laura, Peter, etc.). That's where Penina/Penny comes from - my great-grandmother was Pesl, which is Yiddish for Pearl, and Penina is Hebrew for Pearl.

I too have a lot of requirements. We can't name a baby the same name as someone in our family who is living. I have an unusual first name and I hate it and always have. I mean, I like the name, I hate the experience of having it. So I always pledged I wouldn't do that to my kids, though I guess I failed with Akiva, although at least his isn't made up. But I also can't stand the idea of the teacher calling your name and three kids in the class turning around. I'm also very sensitive to meanings and heritages.

All my elders from my childhood had names that are not to my taste - Julius, Fanny, Irving, Hilda, Erna, Florence, etc. On my DH's side there were Isidore and Eunice. And there are about four Ruths in my family currently, and my sister took Isaac - for her son's middle name! What a waste. Sigh.

I ran my names list past DH last weekend and he read it and gave it back to me and said, "Interesting." Gee, that's helpful.
post #100 of 164
Well, we've had some things pop up about the name Cordelia lately, so we've moved it to the middle spot. (Well, first middle spot -- Guinevere's second MN is a family surname; this baby will have my mother's maiden name as her second MN.)

So the name, I'm pretty sure, is going to be Eowyn Cordelia.

I'm loving it. It's uncommon, with an obvious literary nod, still has the family name thing, and (probably best of all) it flows really nicely with Guinevere, I think.

I'm feeling really food about it. And there was always a sense of hesitation when quietly trying out "Cordelia" on new baby in utero, but lately whispering, "Eowyn," has felt really right.

So I'm tickled. And hopefully that's it and we're good to go. We'll still have a few other backup names to carry with us to the birth center, and I'm hesitant to outright call her by any name, just in case, but so far that's the front-runner.
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