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September 2008 Book Challenge - Page 3

post #41 of 127
I've read The Audacity of Hope as well and also really enjoyed it. I think that all the people who say they don't know who Obama is, should read it. But of course they probably won't.

Thank you snozzberry for the detailed description. Glad you liked it!
post #42 of 127
#32 The Rain Before it Falls by Jonathan Coe
This book has a good idea going, the narrator goes through pictures from her life and tries to explain them to someone that is blind(on a cassette). The tapes are to be given to the blind girl after her death and she has been adopted out of the narrators family.
It was a good idea but went on too long and then ended abruptly and unsatisfying.
post #43 of 127
#50 Sign With Your Baby: How to Communicate With Infants Before They Can Speak by Joseph Garcia

I chose to read this instead of Baby Signs because I figured as long as we're teaching Abby a second language, it might as well be an actual language (American Sign Language) that she can use later on in life too.

A major benefit of this book is that the text to read is less than 50 pages, and that's nothing to shake a stick at when you're a parent with little uninterrupted reading time. The rest of the book is a glossary of signs. However, I have decided to read Baby Signs after all, even though we still plan to use the signs from Dr. Garcia's book.

There are a couple reasons for my change of heart. I started reading Baby Minds: Brain-Building Games Your Baby Will Love, which is by the same authors of Baby Signs. I really appreciated how the authors did a great job of backing up every major point with specific research studies. In Sign with Your Baby, the emphasis is more on anecdotes from parents and Dr. Garcia's own experience.

Because I was reading both books at the same time, I also found myself preferring the writing style of Baby Minds to Dr. Garcia's writing style. There's nothing wrong with it per se—I just thought the Baby Minds authors were a little more engaging and professional. (The book design might be playing into this impression too, as Sign with Your Baby doesn't exactly have a slick book design.)

But what really sealed the deal for me is that in his book, Dr. Garcia actually mentions and recommends Baby Signs. So that made me realize I didn't have to go with one or the other but that I could learn from both. Duh, Kelly.
post #44 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by gabbyquilts View Post
#32 The Rain Before it Falls by Jonathan Coe
This book has a good idea going, the narrator goes through pictures from her life and tries to explain them to someone that is blind(on a cassette). The tapes are to be given to the blind girl after her death and she has been adopted out of the narrators family.
It was a good idea but went on too long and then ended abruptly and unsatisfying.
I agree! I felt the same way.
post #45 of 127
"History Lesson for GIrls" by Aurelie Sheehan

I was about 1/3 through this and realized I'd read it before--but I didn't remember what happened so I read it again. It's a pretty good book about two teens-one with scholios and wearing a back brace in danger of needing a rod inserted in her spine; the other pretty wild with an abusive father.
post #46 of 127
The Honey Thief by Elizabeth Graver

Slow going at first but it finally picks up towards the middle. About a girl who befriends a beekeeper and he takes her on as his apprentice. A lot about how her dad died and how her mom worries about her.
post #47 of 127
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Creepy. Take any old local legend of a haunted house still occupied by two ghostly women and make it true. The two occupants of the house happily tidy up the rooms, preserve jams, bake, and make clothes out of odd materials all while the local townspeople wonder whether or not people really do live in that house.
post #48 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaliki_kila View Post
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson

Creepy. Take any old local legend of a haunted house still occupied by two ghostly women and make it true. The two occupants of the house happily tidy up the rooms, preserve jams, bake, and make clothes out of odd materials all while the local townspeople wonder whether or not people really do live in that house.
Oh ... I do so lurve me some Shirley Jackson. The Haunting of Hill House, We Have Always Lived in the Castle, "The Lottery" all so good. maybe I'll have to read some next month ... it being October and all ...
post #49 of 127
I remember reading all of those (and loving them) years and years ago. Might be fun to reread . . .
post #50 of 127
I'm new here and just found this thread. I love to read. I read a lot in a bunch of areas. Currently I am reading "Second Time Around" by Nancy Moser. It's the story of several people who win a Time Lottery and a chance to go back in time to change something about their life and the option of staying back there in time.

The other book I'm reading is non-fiction. "Stolen Innocence: My Story of Growing Up in a Polygamous Sect, Becoming a Teenage Bride, and Breaking Free of Warren Jeffs" by Elissa Wall.

Both books are good so far.
post #51 of 127
#112 America America by Ethan Cain

Interesting story about politics in New York State in the early 70s and how it affected one man's life. A little hard for me to keep track of the three different time periods in which it took place.

#113 The Lace Reader by Brunonia Barry

Almost finished with this one, takes place in modern-day Salem, Mass. I liked it...... (one thing I take away from it is how interesting it would be to live there today..) from Amazon:

Quote:
In Barry's captivating debut, Towner Whitney, a dazed young woman descended from a long line of mind readers and fortune tellers, has survived numerous traumas and returned to her hometown of Salem, Mass., to recover. Any tranquility in her life is short-lived when her beloved great-aunt Eva drowns under circumstances suggesting foul play. Towner's suspicions are taken with a grain of salt given her history of hallucinatory visions and self-harm. The mystery enmeshes local cop John Rafferty, who had left the pressures of big city police work for a quieter life in Salem and now finds himself falling for the enigmatic Towner as he mourns Eva and delves into the history of the eccentric Whitney clan. Barry excels at capturing the feel of smalltown life, and balances action with close looks at the characters' inner worlds. Her pacing and use of different perspectives show tremendous skill and will keep readers captivated all the way through.
post #52 of 127
Confessions of a Naughty Mommy: How I Found My Lost Libido by Heidi Raykeil
This was an awesome book! It was about so much more than sex and finding one's libido after motherhood. It was actually one of the better books I've read about motherhood and how earth shattering it can be to take on this new identity. I could relate to the author on so many levels -- not just the sex stuff but extended breastfeeding, co-sleeping, being a SAHM, raising a daughter, etc. The book was at times painfully raw and honest, and also very humorous. I loved this woman! She is not only intelligent and articulate, but she has the nerve to ask the salespeople at Victoria Secrets if they have crotchless panties. Anyway, it really was a great read.

To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
I had actually never read this. (I know, how embarrassing!) I think I had started it once in high school but never finished it. I thought it was about time I read it. And of course I can see why it is a classic. Excellent book. I'm glad I finally read it.
post #53 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OMama View Post
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
I had actually never read this. (I know, how embarrassing!) I think I had started it once in high school but never finished it. I thought it was about time I read it. And of course I can see why it is a classic. Excellent book. I'm glad I finally read it.
I'm glad you finally read it too. Everyone needs to read this book on a regular basis. The local library here is sponsoring a "Big Read" event where everyone is supposed to read To Kill a Mockingbird at the same time and then they are having events at the library designed around the book.

The eighth graders I work with read it (as part of their Civil Rights Unit). Last year, while they were doing their Classical Literature reading unit, one of the girls in the seventh grade asked my advice on what book to read. Knowing she was of above intelligence and comprehension for a seventh grader, I recommended TKaMB and she absolutely fell in love with the book.

I ended up giving her a copy of it for Christmas and you would have thought I had given her the keys to a Ferrari or a million dollars. She has since confessed to me that she has read it another five times since that first reading, and is absolutely looking forward to reading it again this year.

I honestly believe that that book has the power to change lives.
post #54 of 127
Thread Starter 
Apparently I feel particularly strong about To Kill a Mockingbird :
post #55 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewCrunchyDaddy View Post
Apparently I feel particularly strong about To Kill a Mockingbird :
I love that book too! Scout and Boo are my favorite! : And of course the dad too, which I am embarassed to say, his name is escaping me right now!
post #56 of 127
Atticus

post #57 of 127
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fremontmama View Post
I love that book too! Scout and Boo are my favorite! : And of course the dad too, which I am embarassed to say, his name is escaping me right now!
My Mom actually nicknamed me "Boo" for the first four or five years of my life after the character from the book and movie, because I had an unruly shock of blonde hair like Robert Duvall in the film.
post #58 of 127
39. Life As We Knew It - Susan Beth Pfeffer

YA/SF/Dystopia - Wow, this is a scary freaking book. The moon is hit by a meteor (this is not unexpected) - what is unexpected is that it had a larger mass than anticipated, and the meteor knocks the moon out of its orbit. This has major repercussions on earth, with earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes taking place, and day-to-day life falling apart as a result. See through the eyes of 16 year-old Miranda as she recounts in her journal how her and her family and friends lives in rural PA are changed forever.

This was a seriously intense book. I am making my husband read it right now and he is paranoid beyond belief, wanting to go to Costco to stock up on cases of food for whatever natural disasters (or man-made ones) are ready to happen. Recommended, especially for fans of SF in the dystopian genre or even people interesed in what post-peak-oil life might be like.

40. Saint City Sinners - Lilith Saintcrowe
Paranormal/Urban Fantasy - The fourth of the Dante Valentine series. Dante is a Necromance turned part-demon, and in this novel she is called home by her best friend to help solve a murder. This book was strange, like an episode (or season) of a TV series where they throw something different at you for a while, but you really just want to get back to the main story. Kind of frustrating. Like this whole series is, really.

I don't know why, but I just want to kick the main character's ass. She is so whiny and victim-like one minute, and then completely uber-tough, wrong-minded and action-oriented the next. Her relationship with her demon mate, Japhrimel, has to be the most seriously frustrating relationship in the universe. It's like they don't speak the same language. And I guess they are different species (kind of), but I just want to lock them in a room together until they can figure out how to use small words with each other to communicate. Ugh.

41. To Hell And Back - Lilith Saintcrowe
Paranormal/Urban Fantasy - Book 5, the last blessed book in the Dante Valentine series. I found myself skimming A LOT in the this book. I just wanted to see what happened. The writing is frustrating, the characters are frustrating, the action scenes are too detailed. It was an ok-ish resolution for the main story line, but so many side stories were just left hanging. Eh. Kind of frustrated with myself for wasting so much time on it. And annoyed that I just couldn't put these books down and walk away - I just had to know how it all ended. Grrr.
post #59 of 127
from another To Kill A Mockingbird fan here!

Quote:
Originally Posted by OMama View Post
Confessions of a Naughty Mommy: How I Found My Lost Libido by Heidi Raykeil
This was an awesome book!
I'm reading this right now and loving it too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeta View Post
39. Life As We Knew It - Susan Beth Pfeffer

YA/SF/Dystopia - Wow, this is a scary freaking book.
I remember that book vividly because it was so eerie, and I usually don't remember novels that vividly. :
post #60 of 127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keeta View Post
39. Life As We Knew It - Susan Beth Pfeffer

YA/SF/Dystopia - Wow, this is a scary freaking book. The moon is hit by a meteor (this is not unexpected) - what is unexpected is that it had a larger mass than anticipated, and the meteor knocks the moon out of its orbit. This has major repercussions on earth, with earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes taking place, and day-to-day life falling apart as a result. See through the eyes of 16 year-old Miranda as she recounts in her journal how her and her family and friends lives in rural PA are changed forever.

This was a seriously intense book. I am making my husband read it right now and he is paranoid beyond belief, wanting to go to Costco to stock up on cases of food for whatever natural disasters (or man-made ones) are ready to happen. Recommended, especially for fans of SF in the dystopian genre or even people interesed in what post-peak-oil life might be like.
Sounds like a good one! Our library didn't have it available, so I requested it as a purchase. I'm currently reading The Day of the Triffids by John Wyndham. It's amazing how quickly the world can all fall to pieces. With the government taking over Fanny Mae and Freddie Mac and Washington Mutual going under, reading books like these doesn't help.
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