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Crunchy Nurses '08 - Page 4

post #61 of 217
Former NICU nurse here!! I currently do L&D and tons of level 2 nursery because lots of nurses are scared/don't like it. Then we moved away from the NICU I worked it I want to return to the NICU, but there is only one in my area, and its less than desirable to me.) One day, but for now I like my job. We are pretty family oriented and not so interventional. Yeah for crunchy nurses!
post #62 of 217
Hello. I'm a canadian RN and have been nursing for almost 2 years. I would say I am somewhat crunchy....maybe more crunchy wannabe I am not a mother yet, but plan to birth at home when we do have children, and I will be EBF, co-sleeping, non-circ, and selective or non-vaxing (still researching that topic). I try to limit my exposure to chemicals and unnecessary drugs, use naturopathic and preventive care when possible, and while I have been falling off the wagon, I strive for eating a whole foods diet (I really need to work on that one).

Fresh out of school, I worked med-surg (mostly GI and GYN related), and then moved onto a post-partum unit. I loved working post-partum...I was able to do lots of breastfeeding support/teaching, and encourage attachement style parenting (lots of holding babe, co-sleeping with babe, BF on demand, and encouraged READING and REALLY THINKING through the circumsicion decision). What I didn't love was the insane hours and pace of work. I rarely got a break, and worked way too much overtime.

When I moved to a new city this past year (for DP's work) I used the opportunity to get out of the hospital environment and head into the community. So now I am working in a community health center, and so far I am enjoying it. I enjoy working with the particular population we serve. I like the new challenge, and I'm learning alot.

I am glad to have found this tribe!!
post #63 of 217
Are there any nurses here who are non-vax'ers or delay/selectively vax and who work in environments that support/promote vaccinations?

How do you reconcile your own opinion on the vax issue with having to give or promote vax to the families you work with? How open are you about your personal stance? Do your colleagues know your opinion of vax's?

Like I have said earlier, I am researching this topic for myself these days. However, providing/promoting immunizations is a prominent part of community/public health nursing and I don't think I could openly oppose them in my work setting. Right now, I offer/remind parents of the publicly funded immunization schedule, but I don't go out of my way to actively promote and encourage them. I remain very neutral in my presentation. If a family told me they were not consenting to vaxes, or were even questioning it, I would fully support their decision, and praise them for their efforts to inform and educate themselves on the topic before deciding. (This scenario hasn’t presented itself yet). In any case, it is really a decision that is most often discussed between them and their physician/nurse practioner first.....by the time they make their way to me, it is because they have already made their decision to go ahead and vax and have been scheduled for the routine shots. It saddens me though, that many of these parents haven't really given it much thought, or don't even know they have a choice! But if I were to start prompting parents to question the vaxs at their scheduled appointment, I think I could serioulsy jeopardize my job.

Has anyone else found themselves in this situation??
post #64 of 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Night_Nurse View Post

The worst is the nurses who have said negative things about homebirth of the moms who refuse vaxs or interventions. A few of them like to mention how "foolish" it is to birth at home because "what about all of those babies and moms who die"???? Hmmmm, yeah, what about the moms and babies who die in the hospital each year??? Oh wait, we don't want to mention that, it's a big secret, just like MRSA. Shhhh, don't tell!
totally, bad stuff happens everywhere. I am an ICU nurse so I only see Moms with REALLY bad outcomes, but strokes, cardiac issues etc come up during childbirth and with the really bad outcomes it doesn't matter where you are, the fact is a certain percentage of people will die surrounding childbirth no matter where you are. Luckily most are healthy and happy and need nothing.
post #65 of 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedaaria View Post
Are there any nurses here who are non-vax'ers or delay/selectively vax and who work in environments that support/promote vaccinations?

How do you reconcile your own opinion on the vax issue with having to give or promote vax to the families you work with? How open are you about your personal stance? Do your colleagues know your opinion of vax's?

Like I have said earlier, I am researching this topic for myself these days. However, providing/promoting immunizations is a prominent part of community/public health nursing and I don't think I could openly oppose them in my work setting. Right now, I offer/remind parents of the publicly funded immunization schedule, but I don't go out of my way to actively promote and encourage them. I remain very neutral in my presentation. If a family told me they were not consenting to vaxes, or were even questioning it, I would fully support their decision, and praise them for their efforts to inform and educate themselves on the topic before deciding. (This scenario hasn’t presented itself yet). In any case, it is really a decision that is most often discussed between them and their physician/nurse practioner first.....by the time they make their way to me, it is because they have already made their decision to go ahead and vax and have been scheduled for the routine shots. It saddens me though, that many of these parents haven't really given it much thought, or don't even know they have a choice! But if I were to start prompting parents to question the vaxs at their scheduled appointment, I think I could serioulsy jeopardize my job.

Has anyone else found themselves in this situation??
We have a few non-vax nurses, and a few not so nice pro-vax ones as well. As far as the patients go, I always point out to them that Hep B on a newborn is unnessecary. Thats as far as I could go without creating a stir. When we get homebirth, au natural families, I like to support and encourage thier decisions. When the co-workers get funky and critical about some patients choices, I do defend the no eye goop/vit k/rooming in/and so on.
post #66 of 217
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluedaaria View Post
Are there any nurses here who are non-vax'ers or delay/selectively vax and who work in environments that support/promote vaccinations?

How do you reconcile your own opinion on the vax issue with having to give or promote vax to the families you work with? How open are you about your personal stance? Do your colleagues know your opinion of vax's?

Like I have said earlier, I am researching this topic for myself these days. However, providing/promoting immunizations is a prominent part of community/public health nursing and I don't think I could openly oppose them in my work setting. Right now, I offer/remind parents of the publicly funded immunization schedule, but I don't go out of my way to actively promote and encourage them. I remain very neutral in my presentation. If a family told me they were not consenting to vaxes, or were even questioning it, I would fully support their decision, and praise them for their efforts to inform and educate themselves on the topic before deciding. (This scenario hasn’t presented itself yet). In any case, it is really a decision that is most often discussed between them and their physician/nurse practioner first.....by the time they make their way to me, it is because they have already made their decision to go ahead and vax and have been scheduled for the routine shots. It saddens me though, that many of these parents haven't really given it much thought, or don't even know they have a choice! But if I were to start prompting parents to question the vaxs at their scheduled appointment, I think I could serioulsy jeopardize my job.

Has anyone else found themselves in this situation??
We're required to offer the pnemo/flu vax before discharge. I offer, but don't actively promote. I DO promote handwashing, proper nutrition, and avoidance as ways to prevent illness in those who decline the vax. Luckily, I don't have to deal with the pediatric side of it. My youngest hasn't been vaxed yet but he's a breastfed, no daycare baby, so I'm not worried about it. My oldest has had all his shots except the 2nd varicella and MMR, we did titers instead for school entry. MS is a tough state when it comes to vax laws.
post #67 of 217
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by natrualmom View Post
Yeah for crunchy nurses!
: Nice to meet you! :
post #68 of 217
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rsummer View Post
totally, bad stuff happens everywhere. I am an ICU nurse so I only see Moms with REALLY bad outcomes, but strokes, cardiac issues etc come up during childbirth and with the really bad outcomes it doesn't matter where you are, the fact is a certain percentage of people will die surrounding childbirth no matter where you are. Luckily most are healthy and happy and need nothing.
My friend in the UC forum mentioned she had a fear of dying in childbirth because she knew two people who died from a PE after giving birth in the hospital. My take was that this was probably caused by being confined to bed during labor and delivery, and wouldn't likely be an issue at a homebirth. What do you think?
post #69 of 217
23 YEAR LPN HERE -LOOKING INTO WHICH ONLINE COLLEGE TO DO MY ADRN CLASSES--WORKING FULLTIME AT A GREAT HOSPICE NOW AND HOPING TO STAY IN THAT FIELD .
NO VAXES TO GIVE --MEDS FOR THE RIGHT REASONS ,COMFORT BASED -HANDS ON CARE .
WE HAVE A NURSE WHO IS INTO HEALING TOUCH AND ENERGY WORK -NICE TO BE ABLE TO SHARE INFO ON NATURAL CARE AT WORK .
ONE GREAT THING ABOUT NURSING IS THE ABILITY TO FOCUS ON SPECIFIC INTERESTS YOU MAY HAVE.
i ALSO WORK WITH A CNA WHO HAS HAD A HOMEBIRTH AND DOES NOT VAX HER KIDS -IN THIS AREA THAT IS A RARITY!!
post #70 of 217
I vax, but I always ask parents to research vax before consenting. We mostly only do Hep B and Synagis. Most preemie parents want Synagis.

My big problem is circ's. If I get fired for anything, it will be mouthing off about circ'ing. I rarely have to be involved in the actual procedure, but still. So awful.

I'm trying to arrange an objection to assignment sort of thing so I don't have to have anything to do with them.
post #71 of 217
BugMacGee- I really hope you have some success with getting an objection exemption of some sort. I know as nurses we are supposed to support our clients informed decisions, but there are times we also need to protect our own ethics, not to mention advocate for the innocent infants who have no say in the decision. It is so difficult.

When I was working post-partum, circ'ing was something I didn't personally have to be involved in (the charge nurse what the one who assisted), but I did have to observe for bleeding and care for circs after the fact, and instruct parents on how to care for it when they go home. I used to just encourage lots of holding, breastfeeding and cuddles post-circ Luckily, our in-hospital circ rates were actually not very high, since I worked at a hospital that serviced a predominantly jewish population and they usually wait till day 8. Of course, their were some non-jewish clients who would have it done in the first 48 hours, while still in hospital It would really be so frustrating when parents wonder why their little boy is crying more and feeding less/having trouble latching post-circ.

Their were a few times where I had couples ask me whether I thought they should circ or not, and while I couldn't come off too strongly, I was happy to remind them that it was a VERY BIG decision, that deserved alot of thought and consideration. I strongly encouraged them to wait until they had researched it and felt confident in their decision....and as a way to encourage them to wait (so as to buy time ) I reminded them that it actually cost less to have it done out of hospital (the hospital added a fee that didn't apply if done in the community). I would tell them that the rates of circumsion continue to drop, and most people are suprised and unaware of this. And of course, most medical associations don't feel it is necessary. I feel so happy when I know that I have helped a couple reconsider or at least delay the circ.
post #72 of 217
Our parents often ask to talk to the neonatologist about circ'ing. One of ours (we have 4) flat out says "Don't! Why would you???" Love her :

The others are more, Meh, there's no medical reason TO do it.
post #73 of 217
HI all!

I'm a crunchy student nurse. I am *living* for graduation in Aug 2009.

I'm presently having a hard time with my nursing instructors who actually know LESS than I do about the mechanics of the human body, esp. the immune system and allergies. And forget the idea of nurses as lifelong learners -- this woman does NOT want to have her tree shaken at all by new ideas / practices. Grrrr....

I love the idea of helping people and potentially being able to share a little crunchy wisdom with patients.

Happy to have found this tribe!
post #74 of 217
I work post partum some and our gyn docs do our circs and every single one besides the male doc hates them and thinks they are dreadful... and hate doing them so we all comiserate with the babes while we do it. sucks but atleast we are on the same page if we coul only get more parents!
post #75 of 217
Hey,
I am a 3rd year nursing student at the University of Cincinnati goin thru my medsurg course now. I want to work in L&D after I graduate and then go back and become a FNP. I would LOVE to have a practice with other like minded nurses, doctors, and nurse practitioners that focus on holistic care and crunchy views I hope that what i want isn't a pipe dream but we will see
post #76 of 217
Sorry to harp on this circ thing but I was just thinking....
Some of our nurses aren't comfortable taking care of kids on oscillators, so they don't get assigned them. I am uncomfortable taking care of babies about to be circ'ed. Seems like I should get the same consideration as the other nurses dontcha think.

I'd rather have an very unstable oscillator assignment any day (and that exactly what I did all day today!!!) than a stable circ! Bleh!

Im just getting myself psyched up to speak to my manager. I've already talked to the CNS about it and she agrees with me.
post #77 of 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by BugMacGee View Post
Im just getting myself psyched up to speak to my manager. I've already talked to the CNS about it and she agrees with me.
So what happened? Will you be able to be reassigned?

Just got updated with this thread . I hope to never do another accelerated program of any kind ever again, ugh. I miss my baby .

So has anyone had any experience/success with getting certain hospitals to pay for a decent portion of nursing school if you contract to work with them for a certain period of time?
post #78 of 217
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post #79 of 217
Haven't talked to my manager yet but it's a good thing. I haven't had a circ baby in months! Hopefully this streak will continue. If it doesn't, well, I'll cross that bridge when i come to it. BUt I've definitely laid some of the groundwork.

ErinsJuneBug-I wish I could help you but most NICU nurses don't make very relaxed pregnant women. At least not the ones I know.
post #80 of 217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serenyd View Post
: Nice to meet you! :
Hello, and nice to meet you too!
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