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This is puplic school?? - Page 6

post #101 of 113
I'm sure it's different where I live (in BC, Canada) but here the parents don't have to pay for anything at all. All field-trips, extra fees, supplies, lunches, t-shirts etc. have fees attached which we are not obligated to pay if we can't afford it. We don't have to explain or anything. Parents who can, do and those who can't don't.

I find my kids' public school to be fantastic. It's an 'inner city' school too so they have some great supports in place.
post #102 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamajama View Post
I'm sure it's different where I live (in BC, Canada) but here the parents don't have to pay for anything at all. All field-trips, extra fees, supplies, lunches, t-shirts etc. have fees attached which we are not obligated to pay if we can't afford it. We don't have to explain or anything. Parents who can, do and those who can't don't.

I find my kids' public school to be fantastic. It's an 'inner city' school too so they have some great supports in place.
That's because an activist who was a school board trustee sued the school board and the BC Supreme Court ruled that school fees were unconstitutional.
post #103 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belleweather View Post

Which doesn't even begin to take into account that the better schools will raise their prices to accomodate the influx of voucher funding, so a school that used to charge $5000 can now charge $15000 because of the $10000 school voucher -- a neat way to control enrollment, since price alone wouldn't do it anymore.
ITA. I meant to articulate that. Private schools would raise their rates to be roughly equal to the voucher+ their old tuition.
post #104 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanguine_speed View Post
That's because an activist who was a school board trustee sued the school board and the BC Supreme Court ruled that school fees were unconstitutional.
Very cool! I didn't know the history of that. I'll have to read up for sure.
post #105 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Labbemama View Post
Um they will actually. They will call your kid to the office and inquire of them why your mom/dad has not paid.
They will put you into collections actually.
They will put your kid off the school bus if you don't pay the bus fee, and they will flunk your kid in PE if they don't dress out in the gym uniform.

I think it's ridiculous that we have to buy that crummy outfit that doesn't fit anyone right. Why can't they just bring shorts and a tee shirt or sweatpants and a tee shirt?
Most middle and high schools that I know of will either offer loaner PE clothes to kids who have lost or don't have their own set, or the teachers will make an exception so the student can wear something the proper color.

My oldest son is allowed to wear non-regulation PE clothes in inclement weather due to a skin condition... getting overheated is not a good thing, so he has the option of not wearing the stupid double layer shirt.

At my high school, we were allowed to wear PE clothes not purchased from the school, as long as it was a white t-shirt (either school logo or plain) and royal blue shorts or sweats.

In CA, book fees are highly unusual. Occasionally they offer optional supplemental texts for sale, but nothing mandatory.
post #106 of 113
Quote:
The system is too far gone to be repaired imo, we need to do away with them entirely and start from scratch. Go back to one room classrooms,charter schools, montesori and yes, homeschooling. I dont see public schools as a waste of my tax money, I see it as something much worse, because my tax dollars are funding bullying, sexual harrassement, drugs, teen pregnancies, etc. and basically the warehousing of children. All they are being taught is how to knuckle under and survive as a cog in the system. EVery individual child and society as a whole would be much better served if every childs individual talents and interests were nurtured, encouraged and supported.
That's a gross exageration. What may be the experience of some is definitely not the experience of all or even the majority.
I have children in k, 1st, 6th and 8th and do not at all feel as if all they are being taught is to knuckle under and survive. Up until this yr they've all been in regular public school. They have not only thrived but flourished. It is the job of us as parents to make up for whatever they may be lacking.

Quote:
Some magnet schools are very hard to get into. The parents may be trying. It's often not just a matter of "choosing".
Exactly, my daughter was on a charter school waiting list for 4 yrs before she got accepted and at that point we said nevermind.
My 1st grader actually just got accepted into a charter school today after being in school for 5 or so weeks and he's been on the list since the end of last year.

eta: and as to the original point of this post, I agree, some of the school fees can be crazy. However, I would feel like a royal heel if I had to deny my kids something that they wanted to participate in.
post #107 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennlyn
Did you really just say that kids whose parents teach them nothing whatsoever would be better off at home??? Does that count kids of crack-head or alcoholic mamas and daddies? Maybe those kids can just hang out in the streets , unsupervised and illiterate. Guess they'll have great prospects of being productive adults. At least if kids from unfortunate homes go to school, they'll get fed and have half a chance.
Thank you! As a child whose mother was NEVER home, my worn-down public school, in an unsavory part of town (to say the least), was all I had. Free breakfast and hot lunch were my best meals of the day (sometimes my only meals), the library was my sanctuary and the playground was where I used my muscles and imagination. My school friends taught me social skills and my teachers were serogate parents, nurturing my mind, teaching me right from wrong and guiding me through life.
post #108 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by msjd123 View Post
Wow, do you really and truly believe this? That makes me really sad. DH and I are both public school teachers in Los Angeles (the nation's 2nd largest school system) and this kind of attitude really shocks me. Believe me, I have my eyes wide open about the school system's shortcomings, but OTOH, I think we do serve the majority of kids who come through our doors quite well, and I think that parents have a right and responsibility to supplement their children's basic educations in any manner they see fit. School is a starting point; it's a parent's job to nurture a child's individual talents and interests.

As for fees -- i.e. the OP's original point -- I agree that these are usually disclosed prior to enrollemt, but if you ask the principal or AP nicely and explain your circumstances, they can often be waived. If that doesn't work, ask the teacher or even the PTSA. Our school has almost never turned down a request like this.

Yep,I do. And nurturing a childs individual talents and interests IS educating them,not supplementing and I agree that it is the parents job. Not the governments. I know its not a popular opinion.

To whoever said its only 10,000 per child per year in public school, i guess not or parents wouldnt be footing the bill for all kinds of 'extra' stuff that is required for a basic education yet the schools cant afford. ANd I know tons of sahm's who would be thrilled with 10,000 to continue to stay at home. They are doing it now for nothing.
post #109 of 113
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post #110 of 113
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post #111 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anglyn View Post
Yep,I do. And nurturing a childs individual talents and interests IS educating them,not supplementing and I agree that it is the parents job. Not the governments. I know its not a popular opinion.

To whoever said its only 10,000 per child per year in public school, i guess not or parents wouldnt be footing the bill for all kinds of 'extra' stuff that is required for a basic education yet the schools cant afford. ANd I know tons of sahm's who would be thrilled with 10,000 to continue to stay at home. They are doing it now for nothing.

Ah, well, then I suppose it's both a semantic issue as well as a political issue. While I don't agree that SAHM's should get $10,000 a year from the government, I do think that homeschooling parents should be eligible for reimbursement from the government; that would make a lot of sense.
post #112 of 113
I'm sure this will be unpopular, but I DO think that the public school system which is supposed to be free on the attendance side (vs funding side) should be exactly that - free. For outside courses that have no tangible benefit to the school, I can see charging a fee. That would exclude football and band and debate, for through excellent performance it often brings sponsorship.

We pay property taxes towards the cost of the public school. The city residents have voted repeatedly to significantly increase the amount going to the schools, and our system is pretty expansive because of it (a pilot program preschool and pre-k care in every elementary school for example). On top of that, the school district is one of a few that receives a significant endowment from one of the top universities each year in exchange for some of the programs they have agreed to implement. This endowment is not earmarked for those programs and may be used district wide. Our district just purchased 6-7 schools for over 12 million dollars. Do not think there is no money in our district. (Having family directly involved in the district only confirms this.)

Our DS started kindergarten this year. We had the school supplies for his grade. The school supplies for his specific class. The school supplies for art. We have the monthly box of cereal for mid-morning snacks (required all parents bring one box per month for the community chest in the class). We have the monthly pm snacks for 24 children (don't forget things like spoons, napkins, plates if needed, etc.). Notice there is nothing "extra-curricular" in there. We had the first fundraiser start 3 days into the school year. The day after it ended, fundraiser #2 began - complete with pressure on the children to participate. Then of course there are the PTA dues. We just finished the 6th week of school!

We absolutely have no issue with providing our children with whatever they need to thrive in school, that's not the point. And honestly it's been what we'd generally consider a nominal amount. We don't mind providing what we need to, I just would like to know why, in light of their funding, we need to. I'd also like to know where the heck all that money is going that they're so stinking broke! And like the OP mentioned, it would be nice to know in advance what the fees are going to be and when they'll be expected. I would love to see their budget and know where the money is really going!

K.
post #113 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunshineJ View Post
I'm sure this will be unpopular, but I DO think that the public school system which is supposed to be free on the attendance side (vs funding side) should be exactly that - free. For outside courses that have no tangible benefit to the school, I can see charging a fee. That would exclude football and band and debate, for through excellent performance it often brings sponsorship.

We pay property taxes towards the cost of the public school. The city residents have voted repeatedly to significantly increase the amount going to the schools, and our system is pretty expansive because of it (a pilot program preschool and pre-k care in every elementary school for example). On top of that, the school district is one of a few that receives a significant endowment from one of the top universities each year in exchange for some of the programs they have agreed to implement. This endowment is not earmarked for those programs and may be used district wide. Our district just purchased 6-7 schools for over 12 million dollars. Do not think there is no money in our district. (Having family directly involved in the district only confirms this.)

Our DS started kindergarten this year. We had the school supplies for his grade. The school supplies for his specific class. The school supplies for art. We have the monthly box of cereal for mid-morning snacks (required all parents bring one box per month for the community chest in the class). We have the monthly pm snacks for 24 children (don't forget things like spoons, napkins, plates if needed, etc.). Notice there is nothing "extra-curricular" in there. We had the first fundraiser start 3 days into the school year. The day after it ended, fundraiser #2 began - complete with pressure on the children to participate. Then of course there are the PTA dues. We just finished the 6th week of school!

We absolutely have no issue with providing our children with whatever they need to thrive in school, that's not the point. And honestly it's been what we'd generally consider a nominal amount. We don't mind providing what we need to, I just would like to know why, in light of their funding, we need to. I'd also like to know where the heck all that money is going that they're so stinking broke! And like the OP mentioned, it would be nice to know in advance what the fees are going to be and when they'll be expected. I would love to see their budget and know where the money is really going!

K.
I saw you were in Missouri, where I live and work in a public school system. Herehttp://dese.mo.gov/directory/ is a link to all MO public schools. Find your school and click on it, you will see a link called District Planning Profile, click on it and it takes you to another page with several links to look at. It's not particularly user friendly but it can answer some questions.
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