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WWYD...Head LICE!!! And Social Issues - Page 5

post #81 of 172
Our dd had lice 4 times last year - a child in her class at school wasn't being treated at home, now when she goes to school I spray her hair with a mixture of sweet almond oil and TTO, and tie it back in pigtails and it works fine, but if I forget to spray on Monday morning you can be sure that by tuesday she's got them!! I use an actual bottle of TTO rather than soaps or shampoos with it in, because you don't really know how much is in there! Every time that dd has had lice I have informed the school and friends I would never think of not letting folk know - I would hate for us to have infected someone else and not let them know - it's just rude really - I understand the frustration and I know how my heart sinks every time I see those little buggers but I think it is important to let folk know. BTW TTO is really great for getting rid of intestinal worms too, yes they come along as well and their eggs are even airborne so you can get it ANYWHERE - yuck!!
post #82 of 172
Don't you know that you probably have Demodex folliculorum on your eyelashes? And how do you think all those dust mites in your house stay alive all day if they aren't feeding off you?

I am exasperated by the misinformation in some of the posts on this thread and frankly I am shocked that so many people are willing to shun a family who have a few varmints on their head rather than think about how they could cover their child's head to prevent them catching them. THAT is lazy.
post #83 of 172
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post #84 of 172
What orangefoot said. Hat, bandanna, headscarf, etc. Talk to the other mom. Maybe ask about a heads-covered policy for all the kids when playing together. I also liked the de-lousing party idea...
post #85 of 172
Honestly, it must be cultural. All the posters who seem to have the highest tolerance for living with lice are from the UK.

Maybe they're extremely common over there and something people are used to just dealing with, but where I live they're something to be eradicated from the home immediately, and parents are cautious about passing them to others. Among my friends and I, it wouldn't be considered a matter of "shunning" a family for having lice -- the family with lice would *want* to limit contact while they dealt with the problem so that it didn't become more widespread.

It sounds like the OP lives in a culture more similar to mine -- it doesn't seem fair to judge her based on the culture of another area.
post #86 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
Honestly, it must be cultural. All the posters who seem to have the highest tolerance for living with lice are from the UK.

Maybe they're extremely common over there and something people are used to just dealing with, but where I live they're something to be eradicated from the home immediately, and parents are cautious about passing them to others. Among my friends and I, it wouldn't be considered a matter of "shunning" a family for having lice -- the family with lice would *want* to limit contact while they dealt with the problem so that it didn't become more widespread.

It sounds like the OP lives in a culture more similar to mine -- it doesn't seem fair to judge her based on the culture of another area.
I'm from the US, but I live in Holland. I don't think anyone has a high tolerance for living with lice in Europe. I think there's just more of realistic, IMHO, approach to lice. Here, they're viewed as an unfortunate part of childhood.

There are regular inspections at school, usually done by parent volunteers who get training from the Health department. If a kid has lice, his/her parents are informed, and all the parents of kids in the class are informed to be vigilant (hair back in pigtails for long hair, combs to inspect, etc.) So there is a definite, concerted attempt to eradicate lice by the schools and the public health officials, which involves parents.

However, I would never not let my kid play with a friend who had lice. All the social issues aside, there really wouldn't be a point, because if the friend has them, they're probably going around school, or swimming lessons, or wherever anyway. To be honest, if you kept your kid away from a kid with lice, you'd probably be viewed as a super-paranoid weirdo!

I don't want lice and, thankfully, DS hasn't had them. But ... you know . . . if it happens, it happens. We've got the comb, we've got the info from the health department, we've got advice from other families who have had an infestation, and we'll just go with it. And, at least my DS will have friends to play with . .. .
post #87 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
Honestly, it must be cultural. All the posters who seem to have the highest tolerance for living with lice are from the UK.

Maybe they're extremely common over there and something people are used to just dealing with, but where I live they're something to be eradicated from the home immediately, and parents are cautious about passing them to others. Among my friends and I, it wouldn't be considered a matter of "shunning" a family for having lice -- the family with lice would *want* to limit contact while they dealt with the problem so that it didn't become more widespread.

It sounds like the OP lives in a culture more similar to mine -- it doesn't seem fair to judge her based on the culture of another area.
Right now I could do with some clarification- are you saying that we (Orangefoot and I) are extremely common because we're British, or are you suggesting that headlice occur with alarming frequency in our lives? I read your post- twice- got outraged, because over here we use "common" as an insult, and reported it : Must learn to read before I over-react. Sorry, mods
Yes, lice have reached epidemic proportions over here. It's not as bad as in the US, because we haven't yet reached the point where they are drug-resistant- most strains can be polished off with a bottle from the chemist though these days it's apparently taking two or three gos to find the right one. It's got to the point where most pharmacists are actually asking to see a specimen of the lice, presumably so they can sell you the right stuff : Oh, and the medicated shampoos are available free on prescription for them that go that way, because under-16s get free medicines. Saying that, however, I have two children in mainstream primary school and a toddler daughter and we haven't had a case of head lice in the house in three years.
To clarify, we have missed birthday parties for them, and school (but only once). The preferred strategy is that you send your kid into school and the school sends a letter home that night asking all parents to check and treat accordingly. That way, the whole class will be treated at the same time and as long as the parents keep checking for the next 21 days, the outbreak is over- otherwise, as I was trying to explain to dubfam, your kid would be back in school the next day and would probably get reinfested by someone else. We don't not treat, but we keep it in perspective: it's ONLY lice. Their bites cause allergic reactions and it's horrid to think about parasitic organisms, but that's it.
post #88 of 172
Quote:
Don't you know that you probably have Demodex folliculorum on your eyelashes? And how do you think all those dust mites in your house stay alive all day if they aren't feeding off you?
Those things affect people who are allergic to them, but generally speaking, lice itch everyone they infest, not just some.
post #89 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by flapjack View Post
Right now I could do with some clarification- are you saying that we (Orangefoot and I) are extremely common because we're British, or are you suggesting that headlice occur with alarming frequency in our lives? I read your post- twice- got outraged, because over here we use "common" as an insult, and reported it : Must learn to read before I over-react. Sorry, mods
I'm from the UK and I didn't read Limabean's post like that at all, I took it as the headlice were really common and not the people.
post #90 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by flapjack View Post
How much of this is down to the way that it was handled? I'm trying really hard not to get this thread shut down, but treating a child with head lice as if they have leprosy is abuse, plain and simple, and I trust that nobody here would do that to their children. There's a lot of talk about it but nobody is actually picking up and running with the point that Orangefoot and I are trying to make.

When I said it was treated like you had leprosy, I meant the other kids. It was the big thing in school that could make you an outsider. I did not mean the teachers or parents or that. It's emotionally hard on some kids to deal with lice, knowing the stigma behind them. So yeah, I think that it's really wrong for parent's not to take it seriously and try hard to get rid of the problem.
post #91 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by flapjack View Post
Right now I could do with some clarification- are you saying that we (Orangefoot and I) are extremely common because we're British, or are you suggesting that headlice occur with alarming frequency in our lives?
Oh my -- I'm so sorry that it read that way! Yes, I was wondering if lice are more common (as in widespread or frequently occuring) there. It made me think of when my friend traveled to Australia and her host family was amused by her fear of cockroaches, because to them roaches weren't a big deal at all.

ETA: Now my interpretation of the word "common" is all skewed and when I read my first sentence above it makes it sound like I think US lice are more high-falutin' than those in the UK.
post #92 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by orangefoot View Post
Don't you know that you probably have Demodex folliculorum on your eyelashes? And how do you think all those dust mites in your house stay alive all day if they aren't feeding off you?

I am exasperated by the misinformation in some of the posts on this thread and frankly I am shocked that so many people are willing to shun a family who have a few varmints on their head rather than think about how they could cover their child's head to prevent them catching them. THAT is lazy.
No, it's not lazy--it's sensible. I've seen lice spread like wildfire through a classroom. I don't believe for a minute that because my kids usually have their hair tied back that they won't get lice. And I know how long a scarf or hat would stay on my kids' head, and it can be measured in nanoseconds.

Maybe you like having bugs crawling all over you and gluing their eggs to your person. If so, that's terrific. Scratch away. Lots of people, however, find it completely disgusting, and have no desire to submit their loved ones to lice.
post #93 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by EFmom View Post

Maybe you like having bugs crawling all over you and gluing their eggs to your person. If so, that's terrific. Scratch away. Lots of people, however, find it completely disgusting, and have no desire to submit their loved ones to lice.


come on . . . i don't think anyone has said that . .. it's all about the approach to dealing with families experiencing an infestation . ...

furthermore, no one is "submitting" their loved ones to lice (which I don't think is possible! ). Some people are just more relaxed about the *exposure* they allow their children to have.
post #94 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by EFmom View Post
No, it's not lazy--it's sensible. I've seen lice spread like wildfire through a classroom. I don't believe for a minute that because my kids usually have their hair tied back that they won't get lice. And I know how long a scarf or hat would stay on my kids' head, and it can be measured in nanoseconds.

Maybe you like having bugs crawling all over you and gluing their eggs to your person. If so, that's terrific. Scratch away. Lots of people, however, find it completely disgusting, and have no desire to submit their loved ones to lice.
The OP's child is old enough to be told to keep something on his head to keep lice from crawling on to it.

I don't LIKE lice, of course I don't but catching them is just one of those things. My 15yo recently felt itchy and I found eggs and lice in his hair from I don't know where He does have a lot of friends who, like us, have older and much younger children in the family so maybe he caught them from one of his friends who caught them from a younger sibling.

His hair is very thick and at the time was shaggy and down to his shoulders but looking how many eggs he had and remembering the last time I had picked eggs out of his hair at age 6 I offered him a severe haircut down to 3mm. He decided he would rather cut and be done with it in one go so off came the hair. His brother went under the clippers out of solidarity and they were both unrecognisable the next day when they went to school.

Perhaps we are just more resigned and less outraged than you Americans are?

Can I politely suggest to the pp who intimated that those of us from other cultures shouldn't judge US citizens that she might like to pop over to the tribal areas and see just how many of us here are not on US soil or have ever been. If you don't want culturally different perspectives then you might be on a very slippery slope. Being British does not exclude me from this forum any more than any other minority I might come from so please think before you say things like that.
post #95 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by orangefoot View Post
Can I politely suggest to the pp who intimated that those of us from other cultures shouldn't judge US citizens that she might like to pop over to the tribal areas and see just how many of us here are not on US soil or have ever been. If you don't want culturally different perspectives then you might be on a very slippery slope. Being British does not exclude me from this forum any more than any other minority I might come from so please think before you say things like that.
That's not how I meant it at all -- boy, I keep sticking my foot in my mouth in this thread! I'm going to get a reputation as an Anglophobe pretty soon! I meant that since the OP seems to be from a culture in which having lice is considered something highly unusual that must be swiftly dealt with, judging her from the perspective of someone living in a culture in which it's thought of as something that is just going to happen from time to time and it's not a big deal isn't totally relevant.
post #96 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by flapjack View Post
I have to say, I'm shocked at how many people don't routinely check their children's heads for lice. Almost every single parent I know over here wetcombs at least once a week- we do the boys every two days now, Skye every single day. By breaking their legs, it eliminates the possibility of the little blighters breeding. It's not a perfect solution, but prevention is way better than cure.
OP, given that your child's head is crawling with them, the chances are just as good that your kid passed it to the neighbouring family and picked it up at homeschooling group. Lice are nothing to be snobby about, y'know? Certainly the chances are that the reason the family next door couldn't clear them is because your kid kept reinfecting them.



Did you even read the OP's post? The neighbors said they knew their kids had it and had thought that they should have told her about it, but choose not to.
How do you find the time to comb your kids hair with a lice comb everyday? Isn't really time consuming? What methods do you use to keep your kids sitting still for so long, I would love some new tricks in the case I have to comb through my childrens', hair, Do you use TV or video games? Do you have some songs or something? your methods could be useful to the rest of us on this board I am so curious.Does anyone have suggestions for how to get your child to sit still and endure the painful combing out proccess? As a child I remember this being the worst part of lice ...sitting still.
I really like the idea of a de liceing party mabye one parent combs while the other 3 parents de-lice carpets/bedding, what a great idea! What a great way to help support your neighbors in what must be a really hard thing for them right now.
post #97 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by orangefoot View Post
The OP's child is old enough to be told to keep something on his head to keep lice from crawling on to it.
No...not really. It is summer here and I am not going to expect my son to wear a hat over his AFRO. Do you know how hot that would be???!!
He would certainly end up removing it due to discomfort.

.
post #98 of 172
Um yeah put me down for chicken pox too over head lice.

We had a kindergarten that was infested with them badly. AND the little buggers were the pesticide resistant little beasts.

The pediatrician wouldn't give us any more of the lindane shampoo (which is way more harmful to kiddos can cause neuro damage and stroke if applied too much, can't be used on kids under 2.

WE had just got our house free of them when school got out in June after an EIGHT week battle with them and dd got reinfested on the FIRST day of First grade.

I withdrew my child over it and called the board of health. Seriously I spent the entire summer vacation trying to get all 5 of us nit free. Drove me psycho really truly.

And I believe they are a big deal because the bites can get infected. They are hideous. Good Luck ridding your home of them mama.

I ended up steam cleaning everything. Bagging up what I could not steam clean and exposing it to summer Arizona heat outside. Using the nit loosening gel over a towel and then throwing the towel immediately in washer on hot and vaccuuming where I had combed the kids hair and throwing out the vaccuum bag.

We also used vinegar after shampooing and that seems to be an old wives tale that along with some OCD behavior I think did the trick. I can't be sure if it was the vinegar because I did about everything short of setting our hair on fire. I shaved the boys heads. ANd I cut mine to a bob. It was to my behind at the time.
post #99 of 172
This topic is hot right now for me because dd2 brought home from school a letter stating that a student in her class had lice.

So i put TTO in their shampoo/conditionner and also in my water bottle that i use when i brush their hair in the morning.

Tonight, we washed all dd's hairs and went thru with a nit comb. I didnt' see anything but healthy scap.

Tomorrow, i think i will do a bun in her hair.

Plus everytime i read about lice or think about lice, my head itches. lol
post #100 of 172
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by limabean View Post
Tsince the OP seems to be from a culture in which having lice is considered something highly unusual that must be swiftly dealt with, judging her from the perspective of someone living in a culture in which it's thought of as something that is just going to happen from time to time and it's not a big deal isn't totally relevant.
Thanks Limabean!!
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