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newborn sleeping... not eating...

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
need help quick! My sister-in-law just had my nephew last night. Like most babies he is just sleepy and won't nurse. they've tried stripping him down, but it's still not helping. any thoughts? It's 1:30pm now and he last nursed at 7:30am.... doesn't that seem too long to go? She said he did nurse forl ike an hour when he did nurse. Any thoughts? I don't want to him to lose weight, end up jaundice, and hten the doctors try to shove formula down his throat.. help!!!
post #2 of 14
OMG, it is very dangerous for a newborn not to receive any nourishment for longer than 4-5 hours. Your SIL is also seriously risking her milk supply by not getting the baby to nurse for 20 minutes on BOTH sides every two hours. That means the baby should have nursed at 9:30am, 11:30am and at 1:30pm! Your SIL MUST do anything she can to wake up the baby - undressing, diaper change, wet cloth on the foot. Please get her assistance now!
post #3 of 14
Here is some good info onthe first week:
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/normal/newborn-nursing.html

Did your SIL have an IV? Baby may be overhydrate from IV fluids and not 'feeling' hungry/thirsty because of it. Can your SIL spend ALL her time with baby skin-to-skin? That should help with nursing. Hand expresion of the colostrum (and re-feeding by syringe or cup if needed) will help to jump start her supply too.

I hope that baby is doing OK and your SIL is getting good help.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullMetalMom View Post
OMG, it is very dangerous for a newborn not to receive any nourishment for longer than 4-5 hours. Your SIL is also seriously risking her milk supply by not getting the baby to nurse for 20 minutes on BOTH sides every two hours. That means the baby should have nursed at 9:30am, 11:30am and at 1:30pm! Your SIL MUST do anything she can to wake up the baby - undressing, diaper change, wet cloth on the foot. Please get her assistance now!
This is a genuine - i.e., not a snarky - question - is this really true? My ds didn't latch at all for the first two days due to flat nipples. I'm pretty confident that if he got any colostrum during that time, it was very, very little - certainly not 20 minutes worth every 2 hours. I also thought it was common for babies to sleep a TON during the first 2 days, before your milk comes in - mine woke every 4 hours, we would try nursing, then eventually give up as he fell back asleep. I thought that since you don't have any milk yet, they don't need it...of course you need to nurse to bring in the milk, and it sounds like this baby probably needs some nudging to wake him up, but 20 minutes on each side every two hours? Aren't most moms still working on latching with a newborn, let alone huge nursing sessions? I'm genuinely curious/asking for info on this point as others respond to the OP.
post #5 of 14
Hmm, I agree with jmmom...

The first two days or so after I had my baby, she even slept about 5 hours straight a few times! The midwives at the hospital didn't seem worried about that. And other people also told me that newborns tend to sleep really a lot the first couple of days (and not to get my hopes up, cause it would change ).

Only from about day three did our girl start to wake and nurse more frequently (as in, every hour ).
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmmom View Post
This is a genuine - i.e., not a snarky - question - is this really true? My ds didn't latch at all for the first two days due to flat nipples. I'm pretty confident that if he got any colostrum during that time, it was very, very little - certainly not 20 minutes worth every 2 hours. I also thought it was common for babies to sleep a TON during the first 2 days, before your milk comes in - mine woke every 4 hours, we would try nursing, then eventually give up as he fell back asleep. I thought that since you don't have any milk yet, they don't need it...of course you need to nurse to bring in the milk, and it sounds like this baby probably needs some nudging to wake him up, but 20 minutes on each side every two hours? Aren't most moms still working on latching with a newborn, let alone huge nursing sessions? I'm genuinely curious/asking for info on this point as others respond to the OP.
Even a little bit of colostrum is calorie rich, so even though it seems like the baby isn't getting much of anything, they are getting the calories they need to get to the next nursing session. The 20 minutes isn't for the baby to get colostrum, it's for the mother's breast to get sufficient stimulation to create a good milk supply. That 20 minutes is the baby nursing and working on latch. With my dd I put her on each breast for 15-20 minutes, corrected her latch if need be and, yes, sometimes there was only 40 minutes or less between nursing sessions. It was exhausting and really hard but my milk came in very strongly. I know women who just let the baby sleep as long as they wanted as a newborn and then wondered why they barely had any milk come in. I was instructed by nurses, mws, etc. about the baby's blood sugar getting dangerously low after more than 5 hours. JMO of course.
post #7 of 14
I have heard that newborns (term, no other issues) can go the first 12-24 hours without any fluid intake - can anyone confirm this?
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullMetalMom View Post
Even a little bit of colostrum is calorie rich, so even though it seems like the baby isn't getting much of anything, they are getting the calories they need to get to the next nursing session. The 20 minutes isn't for the baby to get colostrum, it's for the mother's breast to get sufficient stimulation to create a good milk supply. That 20 minutes is the baby nursing and working on latch. With my dd I put her on each breast for 15-20 minutes, corrected her latch if need be and, yes, sometimes there was only 40 minutes or less between nursing sessions. It was exhausting and really hard but my milk came in very strongly. I know women who just let the baby sleep as long as they wanted as a newborn and then wondered why they barely had any milk come in. I was instructed by nurses, mws, etc. about the baby's blood sugar getting dangerously low after more than 5 hours. JMO of course.
I think that you're right that even working on latch can help with the mother's milk coming in. At any rate, my milk came in great within 2 days, but everyone around me chalked it up to an intervention free, all natural birth. I certainly didn't nurse every 40 minutes - although now I see that you said there was sometimes only 40 minutes in between nursing. We probably tried every 2 hours or so during the day, less frequently at night - there's no way I could have nursed every hour at night, I had been in labor for 70 hours and hadn't slept in days, and exhaustion is bad for your milk, too! That's not to completely disagree with you - 5 hours seems too long to go IMO, even 4 hours probably shouldn't be the norm, and certainly there should and will be times when nursing is quite frequent in those first couple of days. (After that - well, after that, my little guy nursed continually, i.e., on average every 20 minutes, esp during the day.)

I also think that, while the babes of course need to be encouraged to nurse somewhat, and at least every 4 hours, doesn't the fact that intense sleeping is the norm these first 2 days sort of signal that it's ok? Nature doesn't usually set things up to fail...

I'd love to hear other responses. Thanks for yours, FullMetalMom!
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by FullMetalMom View Post
Even a little bit of colostrum is calorie rich, so even though it seems like the baby isn't getting much of anything, they are getting the calories they need to get to the next nursing session. The 20 minutes isn't for the baby to get colostrum, it's for the mother's breast to get sufficient stimulation to create a good milk supply. That 20 minutes is the baby nursing and working on latch. With my dd I put her on each breast for 15-20 minutes, corrected her latch if need be and, yes, sometimes there was only 40 minutes or less between nursing sessions. It was exhausting and really hard but my milk came in very strongly. I know women who just let the baby sleep as long as they wanted as a newborn and then wondered why they barely had any milk come in. I was instructed by nurses, mws, etc. about the baby's blood sugar getting dangerously low after more than 5 hours. JMO of course.
i nursed DD only about 5 times in the first 24 hours. they (the nursery nurses) just didn't bring her any more frequently than that, and i was in no condition to fight them. we could not room in due to her requiring monitoring for meconium aspiration syndrome. i was worried this wasn't enough nursing.

my milk came in in 36 hours, so apparently, for US, it was enough.

this is on top of the fact that i had a 17 hour labor, an epidural, pushed for 4 hours, had an emergency c-section, DD was born with no respiration and had MAS (as i said,) and we both had IVs for the entire hospital stay, and she didn't latch on at all for the first 4 hours because i didn't see her.

i think a lot of milk coming in is genetics/luck/something you have no control over. sure, nursing a lot is supposed to help, as is having a natural birth. but my milk came in like gangbusters and everything in our situation was "wrong."
post #10 of 14
I'd try syringe feeding or using a medicine dropper to feed him so he's getting something. If he continues to be sleepy over the next few days I'd bring him into the pedi to rule out medical problems. Many babies are sleepy the first day or so after birth and it means nothing but sometimes it can be a warning sign. For us it meant heart defect.
post #11 of 14
For both my kids, they were pretty sleepy the first day or so, but while my daughter (kiddo #1) got into a reasonable routine after that, my son was jaundiced and very sleepy for much longer. I finally had to pump and feed him with a spoon for a few feedings so that he got enough strength to really latch on and then nurse.
post #12 of 14
Mine was sleepy. He would latch and nurse but not every 4 hours! He did twice within an hour or so of birth, then slept all night.

He's 7 weeks old and 14+pounds now and nurses like a champ. My milk came in at less than 48 hours PP. I can also pump of 4+ ounces AFTER he's finished.

If a full term baby is not sedated due to pain medication or any other reason and is just sleepy, I think it's okay to let them sleep for awhile. We would wake DS up at 6 hours as the maximum for the first weeks though- we did this by stripping him and me down and laying him naked on my chest and then talking to him and tickling his feet and cheeks until he rooted.
post #13 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatioGardener View Post
I have heard that newborns (term, no other issues) can go the first 12-24 hours without any fluid intake - can anyone confirm this?
I can say that it is very typical. on day one, for the baby to have only one good feed (anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour) in the first 12 hours and one or 2 in the second 12 hours. After that, you're looking at a more typical pattern of every 1 1/2 hours to every 3 hours. With colostrum, some babies will go for 6 hours or so between feeds, but I'd still try to wake the baby up at the 3 hour mark, to attempt a feed -simply because some babies sleep through hunger cues. Babies are so individual and vary within normal limits with their feeding patterns.

I'm sure the OP's nephew has long since gone on to nurse well. Just wanted to pass this on.
post #14 of 14
I had my son two weeks ago. He at first was not interested in eating at all and would go a long time between feedings. I would wake him up every three hours and attempt to feed but he would only nurse about once every three times. He did this for about the first 48 hrs. After 24 hrs. the lc did have me pump after each attempt and give him what I could. The ped did monitor his jaundice levels, his weight, and sugar levels (this was becasue he was early). He was able to keep everything within a normal range.

I would encourage her to stick with BF and wake him up every three hours. He will get the hang of it.

My ds is two weeks old and I still wake him up every 3 hrs during the day to nurse and I only let him go four hours once at night before waking him up. He is just a sleeper and laid back. He is not a fussy baby, so I have just had to learn his cues.
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