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Why not have the baby bathed at the hospital? - Page 2

post #21 of 67

Related Question

What happens in a waterbirth - does the vernix rinse off in the water, or does it stay on until deliberately "washed"?
post #22 of 67
Lina pooped all over both of us shortly after coming out and had no vernix, so she got a bath in the L&D room. The nurse brought in a tub with warm water.
post #23 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Limabean1975 View Post
What happens in a waterbirth - does the vernix rinse off in the water, or does it stay on until deliberately "washed"?
Its waxy - so I think most of it wouldnt come off by just being born in the water.
post #24 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by ann_of_loxley View Post
Its waxy - so I think most of it wouldnt come off by just being born in the water.
:

It's basically like shortening that you use to cook with. I would assume like shortening that the vernix would also help keep baby warm. Thans to a science experiment in 2nd grade, covering your hand in shortening and the sticking it in ice cold water is kind of like how a whale's blubber keeps them warm.
post #25 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by sweeetpea View Post
::

I have seen babies kept in the nursery under the warmer for HOURS because of the temp drop caused by the bath. Makes me heartsick.
I worked L&D as an RN and I would always return the baby asap to the mom. I once got written up because I was being "careless to the health of the baby" because I suggested the mom breast feed right away after I gave her the baby so she could warm him up. Yep, got written up, did not get my raise, and it was in my permanent record.
post #26 of 67
When DD was born (I had a CS), they didn't bathe her until we got up to my postpartum room. The nurse gave her a gentle going over in plain water then bundled her up and handed her straight to me to hold.
post #27 of 67
My daughter was just set on my belly and wiped down with a warm cloth there while she was on me. I don't think I'd like having her taken away for a bath. They said they kept her on me to regulate her temperature and that newborns don't need full baths anyway. It's funny how different hospitals can be so different.
post #28 of 67
At the birth clinic in France the policy was no baths until day 2.

The reasons were: worry about temp drop, vernix protects skin, and the smell of the vernix is very comforting to the baby, as it is familiar from the womb. For this reason, we were also discouraged from using the little baby mittens-- so that DS could get his hands to his face and smell the familiar smell.
post #29 of 67
colonization with hospital bacteria- how clean can they get a baby bath tub in the hospital? what is the baseline flora there? what is the type of soap are they plan to use? is it safe? how long are you going to wait to get your baby back, will the baby fall asleep in the mean time so not only cool off from being wet and in drafty air but also miss that first early awake time and the first feed- then brought out sleeping and later tested to find the blood sugar too low- have had many many friends have this happen as well as know the nursery tecs and nurses who say the same thing-- now if it is a very small hospital and not very busy probably not as big of a deal they may be efficent-
post #30 of 67
Babies and Mamas who are not bathed immediately after birth tend to have fewer latching issues and breastfeeding tends to go much smoother. It has to do with pheromones.
post #31 of 67
I think I wouldn't let anyone bathe my baby for 2 reasons: 1)they'd have a hard time getting her off me; 2)what is the point? New babies aren't dirty. What's a little blood and vernix? Just wipe the face off and leave it at that.

DD1 was bathed on day 2, the nursery nurse came into the room to show DH and I how to do it. It was quite helpful, she just used water and was very gentle, gave DD1 right back to me to dress and cuddle.

DD2 wasn't bathed in hospital at all, even though we stayed overnight. Nobody even suggested it. She had blood on her head and my mom was freakin' out, wanted me to take a washcloth to it but I stood my ground and didn't bathe her for a week. She smelled lovely.

FWIW, neither of mine had any vernix.
post #32 of 67
I have had 6 hbs and 1 hospital birth. All my hbs babies didn't have a bath for at least a week. Sometime 3 . I love the smell and don't want to wash it away. Only 1 of my babies had vernix all the others were dry as sand (cause all of them were post dates), I am sure a bath would not have been a great idea.

My hospital birth I asked that dh bath the baby. He started to and the nurse complained about his procedure and so she took over. I was busy hemorrhaging so I have no idea what happened but dh said she was very rough. We had trouble bfing, the only baby I ever had trouble getting latched on.

I have had 3 water births and I didn't notice them being any cleaner than the land birth ones. I do remember some blood under nails of a couple of them that I just cleaned up with a wash cloth.
post #33 of 67
Funny, neither of mine were bathed for hours after birth. After the first BF etc.

The baths I give are very gentle. We can't handle babies w/o gloves until they're bathed. Many of our patients are + for Hep B. I'd much prefer to handle babes without gloves. Especially the preemies.

There are many ways to bathe babies that do NOT drop their temps. Any nursery nurse worth their salt knows this.

Meconium is a great breeding ground for e. coli and is full of digestive enzymes. I do not suggest leaving that on baby's skin.

Both mine were born around 40 weeks one 3 days before one 3 after. nOt a bit of vernix on 'em. No rashes either. Never heard the rash prevention theory of vernix.
post #34 of 67
I refused a bath for DD ("it's just water") because she would have had to be under the warmers for a total of 2 hours. And this was when she was only 1-2 hours old! Not a difficult decision!
post #35 of 67
My DD was born at 39w0d with no vernix so we didn't have anything to rub in. Hospitals do vary a lot... Mine encouraged breastfeeding and bonding for 2 hours before we were moved to the postpartum floor. At the time, I hadn't thought about opting out of procedures and they did the bath when I was being moved. One nurse took me, and one went with DH and my DD. He was with her the whole time and I remember DH telling me they put her under the heat lamp, but it wasn't long because she was back with me before I knew it. I'm giving birth at home this time, so I won't have to worry! If we were at the hospital I'd probably opt out this time for all the reasons mentioned. There's no need to expose her to any unnecessary germs, cold, etc. or be away from me when it's not really necessary.
post #36 of 67
My third baby was born two weeks early in a hospital birth, and had a lot of vernix and other "goo" - much more than my other two.

DH asked when they were going to clean it all off, and the nurse said, "Oh, we never clean of the vernix - the baby needs it!" She told us it will be absorbed and diminish by itself, and only when it is gone should we give our daughter a "proper" bath.

So some hospitals are sensitive to this...lucky I was in one of them!
post #37 of 67
Neither of my babies had any visible vernix at birth. The first I think was bathed in the nursery (OB birth, I didn't know I had any choices). He ended up with horribly dry skin that I finally figured out to moisturize with lanolin after trying all kinds of baby lotion for a week or so. The second didn't get bathed in the hospital. But he was born with a beautiful head of hair that I wanted to see all fuzzy, so I washed just his hair the day after he was born to get all the crusties and goobers out. Then I rubbed his whole body down with lanolin a couple times to prevent dryness.
post #38 of 67
How does meconium have e coli? I thought babies guts weren't colonized with anything until after birth.

DD and I were covered with mec, but she just got a gentle wipe-down from daddy and the mw apprentice. I don't consider that a bath. She still had lots of vernix left underneath that.
post #39 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by paquerette View Post
How does meconium have e coli? I thought babies guts weren't colonized with anything until after birth.

DD and I were covered with mec, but she just got a gentle wipe-down from daddy and the mw apprentice. I don't consider that a bath. She still had lots of vernix left underneath that.
I think she said it was a great "breeding ground" for E. coli rather than that it contains E. coli. It does not, you're right, unless there is an infection of some kind. Poo is kind of E. coli's natural habitat though, so I don't necessarily disgree that it's a breeding ground for bacteria. That said, all human tissue/fluids etc are breeding grounds for bacteria and this isn't a bad thing. Hell, hospital disinfectants are breeding grounds for some bacteria.

All I know is this: My first was a post dates pit induction. He was born after 7 hours of labour and latched on without a hitch less than 20 minutes after he was born. Everything that needed doing to him happened on my chest. We were not separated until he was weighed something like 2-3 hours after he was born. The next separation happened when I showered and he was bathed. After that scream fest, I tried to nurse him and he had trouble latching. This is where the trouble started for us. I got engorged, he wouldn't latch, he got jaundiced and sleepy etc.

My 2nd was born at 42weeks. Again he was born and went straight to the breast. He pretty much camped out there for the first 2 weeks, but I digress . He was not bathed until he was 7ish hours old. I didn't shower at all until the next day as I came home that night. I showered the next morning. This baby had no latching issues and while he did have a little touch of jaundice, it was nowhere near as bad as his brothers. He was not in the least bit sleepy.

This of course is all anecdotal and the jaundice with the first could have been due in part to the pit, but the research and data backs up my anecdotal evidence .
post #40 of 67
The best media for growing e.coli contains bile salts (chocolate agar). Which are an element of meconium. Better than blood. So not all bugs grow as well in all bodily fluids.
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