or Connect
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Multicultural Families › Feeling self-conscious speaking my language with dd
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Feeling self-conscious speaking my language with dd - Page 2

post #21 of 22
I just wanted to give you some encouragement from another point of view.

My dh is from India and we are living in the US (he is now a citizen). I WISH he had spoken his language with our kids. I wish I wish I wish so much! He was raised speaking both Tamil and English as a child in India. When he came to the US he was very fluent in English. We agreed that when we had children he would speak only Tamil to them. He then became self-conscious and stopped speaking Tamil outside when my first was an infant, and he finds it easier to speak to me in English at home since I don't know Tamil, so he doesn't transition well. As a result my kids don't know any Tamil at all other than what they picked up in India "What's your name? How old are you?" is about all they know. And they answer back in English. The kids can't even talk to their great grandmother in India which makes her very sad.

I am hoping that when they get older we can send them to India for entire summers and they will pick up more of the language and culture. I just wanted to encourage you to continue doing what you are doing, because I am living with what was not done and it's kinda sad. You are giving your child a gift that cannot be given later in life as naturally.
post #22 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post
I just wanted to give you some encouragement from another point of view.

My dh is from India and we are living in the US (he is now a citizen). I WISH he had spoken his language with our kids. I wish I wish I wish so much! He was raised speaking both Tamil and English as a child in India. When he came to the US he was very fluent in English. We agreed that when we had children he would speak only Tamil to them. He then became self-conscious and stopped speaking Tamil outside when my first was an infant, and he finds it easier to speak to me in English at home since I don't know Tamil, so he doesn't transition well. As a result my kids don't know any Tamil at all other than what they picked up in India "What's your name? How old are you?" is about all they know. And they answer back in English. The kids can't even talk to their great grandmother in India which makes her very sad.

I am hoping that when they get older we can send them to India for entire summers and they will pick up more of the language and culture. I just wanted to encourage you to continue doing what you are doing, because I am living with what was not done and it's kinda sad. You are giving your child a gift that cannot be given later in life as naturally.
We had this experience, too. I wanted my husband to speak only Arabic to the kids from birth even when we lived in the U.S. And he found it easier to speak in English. Now that we're back in his country, we're seeing the result of the choices we've made. This is another reason why I feel justified in teaching them my native language even while we're here. I don't want the youngest to go back to the U.S. unable to speak English and have the same pain and rejection my oldest is feeling here.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Multicultural Families
Mothering › Mothering Forums › Mom › Parenting › Multicultural Families › Feeling self-conscious speaking my language with dd