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Anyone ever quit after maternity leave? - Page 2

post #21 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlyboys View Post
Yes, I quit. I went back to work for one day. I literally walked in, told them I was quitting and walked out. I didn't even wait for them to find someone to replace me for that day. I don't regret it in the slightest.
Me neither! Of all the crap I put up with for months during my pregnancy (for some reason me being pregnant really ticked off my boss, who is also female) I did the same thing. No regrets.
post #22 of 42
i was a ft mngr at a trendy clothing store and worked up until i was told not to by my dr (36 wks), i had no intention of coming back but our ins was thru them at the time so i kept my mouth shut and at 6 wks PP went in and resigned (after all my bills had been paid) with 2 wks left on my NONpaid leave. i did prepay my premiums up to 7 wks. no one said anything to me except we'll miss ya
post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by mytwogirls View Post
Sorry if I pissed you off, I was just answering honestly. I did not have to pay them back, but I did not get paid maternity leave, in fact, I had no vacation to use (I had used it up during my doctor's appointments, they MAKE you take vacation time for a doctor's appointment.) I was tired of the bull$hit sexism that took place there. They were only allowing me 6 weeks for maternity leave and if I did not return within 6 weeks they said I should not return at all, so I didn't.
YOU didn't piss me off, my coworker did. I don't know much about your situation (or at least, I didn't) but hers was different. For one thing, we're in an all-female workplace, tons of support for dr's appointments and etc. We work for a company that gives really good benefits, including 8 weeks paid and up to 6 months unpaid leave for maternity, paternity, and adoption leave. That does not include vacation time, which we also get and can use to extend the paid leave. She knew from the very beginning that she had no intention of going back-- it wasn't one of these cases where a new mom (or new again) just doesn't realize until later that she can't go back to work. It was something she had planned on all along-- to collect full pay for 8 weeks and then quit. That paid leave is an incentive to remain with the company, not a going-away present; the long leave plus full benefits at 20 hours plus a child-care credit puts this paticular company on Forbes "best companies for working mothers" list every year. As PP have pointed out, women like my coworker deliberately manipulating those benefits hurts everybody else.
post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WeasleyMum View Post
YOU didn't piss me off, my coworker did. I don't know much about your situation (or at least, I didn't) but hers was different. For one thing, we're in an all-female workplace, tons of support for dr's appointments and etc. We work for a company that gives really good benefits, including 8 weeks paid and up to 6 months unpaid leave for maternity, paternity, and adoption leave. That does not include vacation time, which we also get and can use to extend the paid leave. She knew from the very beginning that she had no intention of going back-- it wasn't one of these cases where a new mom (or new again) just doesn't realize until later that she can't go back to work. It was something she had planned on all along-- to collect full pay for 8 weeks and then quit. That paid leave is an incentive to remain with the company, not a going-away present; the long leave plus full benefits at 20 hours plus a child-care credit puts this paticular company on Forbes "best companies for working mothers" list every year. As PP have pointed out, women like my coworker deliberately manipulating those benefits hurts everybody else.
Wow!! Where are you from? Is your company hiring?? lol. In that case, I can see that is a crappy thing to do...

I'm kind of in a bind and wondering what to do myself. I don't WANT to come back to work after baby if I don't have to - that I know for sure - but hubby and I still haven't determined if i'll have to or not. I don't want to screw over my work as they've been good to me and accomodating but I really think this will be an extremely last minute decision so I don't want to lose my job either just in case!

Also, our medical benefits are through my company (possibly the reason i'll have to stay - my hubby's insurance is so awful he might as well not even have any). I didn't realize if you don't come back, there's a possibility they'll make you pay?!?! That's A LOT of money!! Hospital bills and all? I figured i'd still be considered an employee, so they couldn't take my medical benefits away. I'd understand if they didn't want to pay the 6 weeks disability, or sick time - that i'm not worried about. Is this really a good possibility that my insurance would be taken if I didn't come back? Now I feel like I'll have no choice but to come back no matter what.
post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WeasleyMum View Post
YOU didn't piss me off, my coworker did. I don't know much about your situation (or at least, I didn't) but hers was different. For one thing, we're in an all-female workplace, tons of support for dr's appointments and etc. We work for a company that gives really good benefits, including 8 weeks paid and up to 6 months unpaid leave for maternity, paternity, and adoption leave. That does not include vacation time, which we also get and can use to extend the paid leave. She knew from the very beginning that she had no intention of going back-- it wasn't one of these cases where a new mom (or new again) just doesn't realize until later that she can't go back to work. It was something she had planned on all along-- to collect full pay for 8 weeks and then quit. That paid leave is an incentive to remain with the company, not a going-away present; the long leave plus full benefits at 20 hours plus a child-care credit puts this paticular company on Forbes "best companies for working mothers" list every year. As PP have pointed out, women like my coworker deliberately manipulating those benefits hurts everybody else.
Oh wow! PAID time off?????? Holy crap, that is amazing! She was lucky to have such a great support system. I worked with mostly men (who were actually more supportive than the women) and a couple of nasty, spiteful women who hated seeing my pregnant belly there day after day That was wrong to do that in her case. I would be pissed too.
post #26 of 42
:

Quote:
Originally Posted by mytwogirls View Post
Me neither! Of all the crap I put up with for months during my pregnancy (for some reason me being pregnant really ticked off my boss, who is also female) I did the same thing. No regrets.
Honestly? This is one of the reasons that companies (particularly small ones) are so reluctant to hire women of child-bearing age. Regardless of all the "crap" you put up with, you really should have been professional enough to give a reasonable amount of notice. The implications of pregnant women just deciding not to go back to work, and not having the courtesy or professionalism to at least give notice, are far more widespread than the immediate fallout to your boss or co-workers.
post #27 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindsG View Post
Wow!! Where are you from? Is your company hiring?? lol. In that case, I can see that is a crappy thing to do...
Bank of America. In my area there's a hiring freeze right now (crazy economy and all) but I don't know if that's everywhere, or regional. To get the full maternity leave benefits, you have to be working there at least a year when you apply.

Mytwogirls: yep. Exactly.
post #28 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by WeasleyMum View Post
Bank of America. In my area there's a hiring freeze right now (crazy economy and all) but I don't know if that's everywhere, or regional. To get the full maternity leave benefits, you have to be working there at least a year when you apply.

Mytwogirls: yep. Exactly.
Banks always seem to have really great benefits - yours are exceptional but I work for a bank and my benefits are really good also. Which brings up another good point - with the economy the way it is right now - it's foolish to burn any bridges. Even if I don't HAVE to work after baby is born, I'm wondering if I shouldn't hang on to this job anyway. It's scary right now.
post #29 of 42
I was very fortunate to have 12 weeks of FMLA and my company tacks on 4 more weeks...however I won't call it "maternity leave" since I had to use my sick, personal and vacation time and for the rest no pay. Anyway, during the course of my leave my position changed a great deal. Not enough for them to be in violation of my leave since the job was still available to me but enough for me to not want to go back. As it happens, I was researching what would happen if I didn't return to work before I found out about the change and discovered that if I returned to work for 30 days after my leave that I would not be held liable if I decided to leave after that. If my job hadn't changed and I did not go back? I would have been liable to pay the health insurance premiums paid by my company during leave. I imagine you have FMLA and are protected under these same guidelines.
post #30 of 42
nak - so quick response

When I was pg with DD I knew I wanted to quit my job but had concerns with a tricky health insurance issue so had to maintian the health insurance through the birth so that DD would be covered. I spoke to our hr benefits person (who, luckily, was also a friend). She told me that it is understood that you cannot assume anything a woman will do until she has the baby. Because so so many women change their minds about working once they've had the baby, no employer assumes 100% that she is returning to work until she is actually back sitting at her desk.

As a friend (not as the HR person) she advised me not to mention my plans to quit - because of the health ins issue - until after the birth so that DD could be added to the insurance. I didn't mind paying to COBRA but I think that the issue was that you can't add someone once you're on COBRAed insurance, so I had to be still under regular insurance.

My friend did say to hold onto the pay I recieved during my leave because the company has a right to ask for that back if you do quit at the end of the leave (my company never did).
post #31 of 42
I did, and it was the right decision. Here in the UK we are fortunate enough to get 9 months paid leave and a further three months unpaid (though the paid leave is not money you could actually live on - still, it's better than nothing). I handed my notice in three months before I was due to go back. Here we are allowed to do that unless your company has paid you a higher rate of maternity pay (some do) in which case you have to go back for at least 3 months. some of my mom friends are currently doing that.

At first I felt guilty but now I reckon, well, I did my time there and its ridiculous that we don't get paid for SAHM-ing anyway, and my job was SO incompatible with childcare - they wouldnt even have been able to supply the legally required nursing/expressing breaks bc of the nature of the work (being to support learning disabled clients).
post #32 of 42
I did exactly that.

I had worked at the same office for 3 years, fell pregnant, planned to go back to work, I had even found a day care for the baby.

All my plans changed when the baby came. I quickly decided that I didn't want to go back to work, but might as well make the most of maternity pay! We're luckier here and we get 3 months maternity, so I guess I was able to plan it better. But what I did was this: when you quit your job here you have to give 6 weeks notice... so I waited till I had 6 weeks of maternity leave left and told my office manager my plans to quit and I resigned. They were a lovely bunch of people and the office manager even told me how she stopped work for 13 years when she had her kids before going back to work. No one thought badly of me for the decision and I'm so so so happy I decided to quit!!

Good luck!!
post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by slylives View Post
:



Honestly? This is one of the reasons that companies (particularly small ones) are so reluctant to hire women of child-bearing age. Regardless of all the "crap" you put up with, you really should have been professional enough to give a reasonable amount of notice. The implications of pregnant women just deciding not to go back to work, and not having the courtesy or professionalism to at least give notice, are far more widespread than the immediate fallout to your boss or co-workers.
Oh well.....it is done and over with. I am a happy camper and really, you should not judge me until you REALLY know what happened at that hell hole! You don't know the situation or myself or what the reasoning was and yes it was CRAP I had to put up with, including being discriminated against because I was pregnant. And by discrimination, I mean not getting raises, snide remarks, snarky sneaky co-workers and just overall horrible attitudes I felt I did not need or want to put up with. I could have been REALLY horrible and kept my insurance and made them pay for it, but I did not. I felt that was being nice. I felt my response was just. Just being honest here.
post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by slylives View Post
:
Honestly? This is one of the reasons that companies (particularly small ones) are so reluctant to hire women of child-bearing age. Regardless of all the "crap" you put up with, you really should have been professional enough to give a reasonable amount of notice. The implications of pregnant women just deciding not to go back to work, and not having the courtesy or professionalism to at least give notice, are far more widespread than the immediate fallout to your boss or co-workers.
I'm going to disagree with this - and I'm totally a career woman weighing in here.

Because of the pathetic amount of leave granted to women (and not men) in the US and the fact that health insurance is only accessible to employed people basically puts us in a position where it's in our own best interest to lie to our employers in the event we don't want to remain employed after having children. If companies have a problem with it, it's the fault of their own policies. They should pay the leave (or grant it if they don't pay any of it) and the health insurance on the basis of the time you have ALREADY worked, not on the contingency of future work.

To the OP - it's certainly not "illegal" to quit your job after taking leave, in the sense that there is a law against it and they will put you in jail. However, the company would be within it's rights to ask for the full amount of all of the health insurance premiums paid during your leave back from you. It's also important to note that many companies pay a portion of the premium for the employee. So the amount taken out of your paycheck for health insurance each week might not be the full amount that is paid to the insurance company. It could be a lot more. And they might want it back.

However, you don't really know what your going to do or how you are going to feel once you have the baby so you might as well tell your company you intend on coming back. It's in your own best interest.

As for me, at 6 weeks PP, it was inconceivable to me that women went back to work at that point. I was still bleeding and could barely bathe 2x a week. I couldn't imagine how women went to work at that point.

At 9 weeks PP, I was feeling like I could go back to work. I was getting a little bored.

At 12 weeks PP, I was definitely ready to go back and I did. Been there ever since. Mommy-led weaned my girl the summer she was 4.5 yo.

But everyone is different. I don't really think you owe your employer anything but 2 weeks notice.
post #35 of 42
I decided to leave my job after returning from mat. leave after about 3 months. I had gotten a horrible review because I just did not have the energy to put into the job. The commute to work stole 3hrs out of my day. I could not put in any overtime. My dd would not drink expressed breast milk and pumping was awkward.

Plus the lack of sleep was killing me.
post #36 of 42
"I don't really think you owe your employer anything but 2 weeks notice."

See, I don't think that was Slylives' point. Rather, it is thinking about the repercussions of these sorts of choices on other women in the workforce. And I think its crazy to say that quiting after receiving paid maternity leave, or quiting without notice have NO impact on the attitudes of employers towards women. I think those who make the choice to quit in those situations need to own that.
post #37 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by LindsG View Post
Also, our medical benefits are through my company (possibly the reason i'll have to stay - my hubby's insurance is so awful he might as well not even have any). I didn't realize if you don't come back, there's a possibility they'll make you pay?!?! That's A LOT of money!! Hospital bills and all? I figured i'd still be considered an employee, so they couldn't take my medical benefits away. I'd understand if they didn't want to pay the 6 weeks disability, or sick time - that i'm not worried about. Is this really a good possibility that my insurance would be taken if I didn't come back? Now I feel like I'll have no choice but to come back no matter what.
No, there is not a possibility that your insurance would be retroactively take away and you would be responsible for the hospital bills. What could happen is that your employer could require you to reimburse them for the cost of your insurance premiums. In other words, you could be resposible for the amount that your employer pays for your insurance during the time you are on leave. Whether you are required to do so would be up to your employer.

My employer told me that they can ask me to pay them back for my premiums (they pay the full amount), but that they haven't ever made anyone to do that. So, I don't know whether I will have to pay or not. I am budgeting on having to pay, and I figure that even if I do have to pay them back, it is the same cost as if I were on DH's insurance for this time.
post #38 of 42
I personally plan on quitting my job as well, though I am not sure if I will return first and then quit or just quite. Mainly because I have been treated unfairly and badly at the job. I just cant bear to have the joy of having a newborn baby and the stress of returning to my dreadful workplace. I dont feel as though you "owe" it to your job to give them a notice if your not really sure. Companies lay people off all the time and do things like pay a newcomer more than they pay an employee who has been loyal to them for years. Does anyone ever call them out no and there reason is usually because there doing "what's best for the company." You should quit according to what YOUR needs are, if you know that you will need the job as a recommendation because you have put in alot of time and hard work then come back for 30-90days and then quit. You no longer need the job then dont come back (just as if they no longer need you they would fire you or "lay you off"). Its 2008 people do what they want to do when they want to do IMO do what suits YOU and YOUR FAMILY because 9 out of 10 the president of your company would DO WHATS BEST FOR HIS/HERS AND THEIR FAMILY!
post #39 of 42
I quit after taking all of my leave, paid, non-paid, vacation, etc. I was 90% sure I was going to do this and talked over all of the options with HR before I left. I have no regrets in doing this and it's certainly not illegal, at least not in CA. I even took leave four weeks before Lucas was due; I was bored stiff with new no clients and trying to look 'busy' all day.

The 10% hold-out was that part of me that was scared of being financially dependent and the side that never wanted to take a traditionally female job (teacher, nurse, SAHM). Oh and the amazing benefits and salary and stock options.

I held out for the possibility of doing my job at home, PT, though I knew that would never happen as our VP just wasn't into that sort of thing. No one was allowed to telecommute. I found something in recruiting, basically recruiting for my job, though it just wasn't what I wanted. So I ended up quitting after going through the online training.
post #40 of 42
I was going to have to go back at 32 hrs/wk when DD was 11 weeks old. I knew I couldn't have gone back at that time, it was just too soon for both of us. I didn't know that at the time I went on leave, though. I had fully intended on going back. So, I turned in my two weeks notice. Nine months later, my old boss called out of the blue, asked me to come back at whatever schedule I wanted, and I've been back for 10 months now. Anyway, I think that depending on your profession, it may or may not be "legal," to quit right after your leave, but I'd venture to say it isn't terribly ethical, either. I think that since you already know you're going to quit, and you can afford the insurance costs, then go ahead and give your two weeks notice as you near your due date.
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