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Getting rid of DIRTY clothes - Page 2

post #21 of 39
i wouldn't donate dirty clothes.. it would be such a huge waste if your local donation center doesn't pre-wash the clothing and instead marks off your bag of perfectly usable clothes as garbage. just designate 2 hours and wash them!

Quote:
I would just take the whole "old" pile....dump on the floor....separate into darks, lights, and whites.......quick wash, dry, and lay flat on a table....all of it, non-stop, until it is all washed dried and laid out flat.
post #22 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamamelia View Post
i wouldn't donate dirty clothes.. it would be such a huge waste if your local donation center doesn't pre-wash the clothing and instead marks off your bag of perfectly usable clothes as garbage. just designate 2 hours and wash them!



ITA with not donating dirty clothes to a thrift store. Either give them away on freecycle (being completely honest about their condition) or bring them to a laundromat, wash them all at once, and then drop them off at the thrift store on the way home from the laundromat.
post #23 of 39
I keep a sack by the dryer and before I make off with the clean dry laundry in a basket to go fold it, I sort it real quick to get the things I no longer need/want and put them into that sack for donation.

It's a quick and easy way to do it and as the bags fill up you can drop them off.
post #24 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by momof2boys1girl View Post
I would head to the laundry mat and spend a few hours there but get them all cleaned at once that way and as you are folding you can sort them and then on the way home donate.
that's what i would do to. i agree w/ avengingophelia about not donating dirty clothes.
post #25 of 39
Note on this subject: I was digging around the bins today and came up with menstrual blood encrusted underwear. No joke. The idea that someone would really think it was OK to donate that blows my mind.
post #26 of 39
Our goodwill has a sign that says they don't wash clothes and will throw out dirty donated clothes. I have the same issue as you... the huge outgrown dirty clothes pile, but I have been throwing it in with the regular stuff and I am slowly working my way thru it.
post #27 of 39
I, too, agree... don't donate them dirty... even if they show no visible signs of dirt and were just worn once and thrown into the clothes pile.

I think the easiest thing to do would be to go to a laundry-mat and use the triple-loader washer, put in as much as you can, cold setting. Then dryer, medium setting, and get it all done as quickly as possible.

Seriously, it will go quickly and you'll wonder why you didn't do it sooner!

gl
hth
post #28 of 39
Just set the washer on cold(so colors don't leak) throw it all in, and have your bag RIGHT by the dryer. As you pull them out, that's where they go. Then carry the bag out to the trunk.
post #29 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by avengingophelia View Post
From the perspective of a facility with no means or funds to wash clothes, it does. They either have to throw it away or try to sell it dirty.
At my old job, dirty clothes would have had to go right to the trash What a waste! But rules are rules and I didn't make them, but had to follow them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
ITA with not donating dirty clothes to a thrift store. Either give them away on freecycle (being completely honest about their condition) or bring them to a laundromat, wash them all at once, and then drop them off at the thrift store on the way home from the laundromat.
Yes, either of those suggestions!
post #30 of 39
Try a pregnancy crisis center. They may be able to hook you up directly with a pregnant woman who will be happy to wash the clothes herself.
post #31 of 39
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the replies! I was really curious what happened to the clothes after they went into the bin. Y'all convinced me I could wash them!

I pulled out my maternity and baby clothes, washed in one load and freecycled them.

DH and my 2 DD's clothes are still here hidden in bags. Those are the worst offenders of the "put it back into circulation" nightmare. I've been trying to wash them and put them right into the "clean" bag. Almost through!! Although I know DH and DD1 have snatched a few pieces out of the dryer before I could get to it! Get them on the next go round, I guess.

Thanks guys. Looking forward to the basement NOT being a sea of laundry, sooner than I thought!
post #32 of 39
Good luck!

I knew a guy who got crabs from second hand pants. I usually sneak clothes out of the rotation when the wearers of those clothes are sleeping, because sometimes it is hard to say goodbye to pants that are 2 sizes too small.
post #33 of 39
thought I'd come back and add somehting that someone just passed on to me! They keep a box right by their "laundry folding station" (in their case, tucked behind the couch they fold the laundry on) and just chuck outgrown clothes in there as they pop up. When the box is full it get's donated.
post #34 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Angierae View Post
Thanks for all the replies! I was really curious what happened to the clothes after they went into the bin. Y'all convinced me I could wash them!

I pulled out my maternity and baby clothes, washed in one load and freecycled them.

DH and my 2 DD's clothes are still here hidden in bags. Those are the worst offenders of the "put it back into circulation" nightmare. I've been trying to wash them and put them right into the "clean" bag. Almost through!! Although I know DH and DD1 have snatched a few pieces out of the dryer before I could get to it! Get them on the next go round, I guess.

Thanks guys. Looking forward to the basement NOT being a sea of laundry, sooner than I thought!
WTG! You are doing great and will be free of these items soon!!! :
post #35 of 39
I'd wash it. But not fold it or sort it. For me, the time-consuming, annoying part of laundry is the folding/hanging putting away.

I'd cram it in the washer, then immediatly dry and put into a garbage bag for donation. Just take a day and keep the cycle going until you're done.
post #36 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by momof2boys1girl View Post
I would head to the laundry mat and spend a few hours there but get them all cleaned at once that way and as you are folding you can sort them and then on the way home donate.
This is a very good idea. That way it can all be done at once.
post #37 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by avengingophelia View Post
Note on this subject: I was digging around the bins today and came up with menstrual blood encrusted underwear. No joke. The idea that someone would really think it was OK to donate that blows my mind.
EWWWWWWWW.

That is completely disgusting.
post #38 of 39
Can you find a local recycling place that only needs the fabric and won't care about the cleanliness? After all, if they're only going to rip it apart anyway, they might not care if it's dirty.

Just a thought.
post #39 of 39
Does your town have a trash pile week? If it's anything like my town you can put dirty clothes out and people will happily scavenge them. I recently helped my friend clean out her garage and we put a bunch of moldy(!) rotting clothes on the trash pile and people scavenged them within a few hours. I was truly embarrassed, but if your clothes are just regular dirty, people really don't care.
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