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Are you Stocking Up or Preparing for an Emergency? Support Thread - Page 10

post #181 of 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeighB View Post
Velochic- I couldn't get yours to load up for some reason.

Seeing the other pics, I def have a long way to go. I am so not as stocked up as I should be!
I took them down. I'll put them back up for a while, but in general, I don't like leaving that info out on the internet.

OK... they're back up. And just a note... that lard you see in some of the pix are for soapmaking. We don't actually consume it. The lard we consume is the healthy , non-hydrogenated rendered lard from the Amish that I keep in the fridge.
post #182 of 259
Ah I understand. Thanks for sharing the pics.

So will things like toothpaste and soap last forever basically? I really need to restock those things.
post #183 of 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeighB View Post
Ah I understand. Thanks for sharing the pics.

So will things like toothpaste and soap last forever basically? I really need to restock those things.
I think soap will. Some toothpaste containers have expiration dates, but I don't know how important those are. We just used the last of a tube that had expired a couple months before, and I didn't notice any taste difference.
post #184 of 259
For those of you who listen to Coast to Coast AM, or others who might be interested, there is going to be a show tomorrow night about the Great Depression, and today's financial issues.
http://www.coasttocoastam.com/shows/2008/10/18.html
post #185 of 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by appalachia View Post
For those of you who listen to Coast to Coast AM, or others who might be interested, there is going to be a show tomorrow night about the Great Depression, and today's financial issues.
http://www.coasttocoastam.com/shows/2008/10/18.html
I C2C!
post #186 of 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by shelbell View Post
I think soap will. Some toothpaste containers have expiration dates, but I don't know how important those are. We just used the last of a tube that had expired a couple months before, and I didn't notice any taste difference.
I'm not sure about this, but I wonder if it's the fluoride that goes "bad"? But yeah, ours has an expiry, too.

Which is why I keep lots of baking soda on hand! Even if the baking soda goes past its expiry for baking, you can still used it as a natural toothpaste. I have sensitive teeth, so I use baking soda regularly. It's very difficult for me to find toothpaste without whitening... which irritates my sensitive, already white enough, teeth.
post #187 of 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by velochic View Post
I'm not sure about this, but I wonder if it's the fluoride that goes "bad"? But yeah, ours has an expiry, too.

Which is why I keep lots of baking soda on hand! Even if the baking soda goes past its expiry for baking, you can still used it as a natural toothpaste. I have sensitive teeth, so I use baking soda regularly. It's very difficult for me to find toothpaste without whitening... which irritates my sensitive, already white enough, teeth.
I looked on the net for info on this last night after I posted, and the consensus seems to be that after time the fluoride will lose its efficacy. It does not appear that it goes "bad" in the sense it will harm your teeth, however.

I've tried baking soda for teeth since I use it for so much else, but the taste just turns me off. Plus, I have very poor enamel on my teeth and don't want to cause any problems with the abrasiveness of the baking soda. I've actually found the thing that makes my teeth feel the cleanest is to just brush with a dry brush and no toothpaste every once in a while. It doesn't hurt that doing so requires no additional cost other than the brush.

ETA - We do stockpile toothbrushes.
post #188 of 259
Thanks for the info, shelbell. I hadn't looked it up.
post #189 of 259
baking soda for toothbrushing brings back horrible childhood memories. Note to self: add toothpaste to my list.


So, I shopped at the Sam's Club and I have to say I was really impressed. I only got a few things but was making mental notes for what to pick up later. We are literlly one week away from our big downsizing move and I am utterly stressed out. DD is also sick and also has some major teeth coming in. It's been a cray time.

But, after much researching, I feel like I have a pretty good idea of how to stock up in a small apartment flat. My plan is to keep and rotate about 2 months worth of food and supplies. I am using extra large canning jars and 5 gallon glass jars for bulk grains. In the laundry room, we are putting in industrial style shelving. (actually the whole space is very euro/industrial design and I am loving it!) and there we will stock bulk orders or tp, water, cleaners, etc. I have gotten a Frontier membership and have budgeted $250 every 10 weeks for supplies. This way I get free shipping and I have a large stock of the kinds of things we like to use. And I'll be utilizing Sam's club in the upcoming weeks and we should be set.
2 months feels perfect to me... I guess I am a moderate stockpiler
post #190 of 259
Don't know if you ladies are seeing the same thing, but I have noticed locally that food prices have been going down a little bit lately. The nerd in me loves these graphs on commodity prices, as well. I grabbed several cans of things at the grocery store yesterday to boost my stockpile. Black beans at .55/can; had been .65/can for the past few months, and most of my stockpile of them was bought at .50/can about 6-8 months ago. Also got a couple of cans of pineapple at $1.08/can - had been $1.18/can recently; we used up the last of my stash during Ike, which had been bought at $1/can last year.

Anyone else seeing food prices falling? It kind of makes me do a happy dance for my stockpile. :
post #191 of 259
Sharon Astyk's blog had a good post yesterday on frugal stockpiling. It's a very basic (and kind of long) article, but I do think it's valuable for any beginning stockpilers on here or to pass along to IRL stockpiling newbies.
post #192 of 259
I've been following the other threads, and just caught up with this one.

We just bought a new house, and usually purchase purified water to drink. Do you think a whole-home water filtration system would be a good idea? I've been looking at this one:
http://www.purewaterexpress.com/wholehouse.htm#1
Expensive, but do you think it would be useful in these situations?
post #193 of 259
subbing
post #194 of 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by shelbell View Post
Sharon Astyk's blog had a good post yesterday on frugal stockpiling. It's a very basic (and kind of long) article, but I do think it's valuable for any beginning stockpilers on here or to pass along to IRL stockpiling newbies.
I LOVE her -- her book is great, too.
post #195 of 259
I'm so excited! My mil said she still owed my husband for work he did so she bought me a bushel of apples from the local orchard. A friend brought me potatoes from her garden and my husband went and gleaned some. I have sooo many that I'm going to be canning for weeks! Our only expense was less than a gallon of gas. I love fall around here because produce is so abundant.
post #196 of 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by veganjoy View Post
I've been following the other threads, and just caught up with this one.

We just bought a new house, and usually purchase purified water to drink. Do you think a whole-home water filtration system would be a good idea? I've been looking at this one:
http://www.purewaterexpress.com/wholehouse.htm#1
Expensive, but do you think it would be useful in these situations?
A home filtration system would be good in normal conditions, but it is of no use to you in an emergency situation. This means a LOSS of water - that's why you have to store water. And then you need a smaller water filter in case you have an extended period of city water loss and are forced to go get water from another source that may not be potable.
post #197 of 259
subbing!
post #198 of 259

State urges Vermonters to Prepare for Pandemic

Article.
Quote:
The Vermont Department of Health is urging residents to prepare for a possible worldwide flu pandemic by stocking their pantries with enough food to stay home for two weeks.

People should buy things like dried foods that have a long shelf life, said Health Commissioner Wendy Davis.
...
Burlington is one of nine communities around the country taking part in a pilot project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to get ready for what scientists believe is the coming pandemic.
...
Some of the foods the Health Department is recommending people stock up on are peanut butter, jelly, dried milk, raisins, nuts, cans of pumpkin, diced tomatoes, rice, pasta, flour and sugar.

The Health Department estimates it would cost about $200 for a family of four to have enough food for two weeks.
post #199 of 259
why canned pumpkin?
post #200 of 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by LizzyQ View Post
why canned pumpkin?
it's high is nuteriants (sp?) and can be used in many different ways like strechting a soup or stew, mixing with mashed potatoes, etc.

It's canned so has longer shelf life and it nuteriant dense food.
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