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Why take bread & not wine?

post #1 of 44
Thread Starter 
I was chalice bearer at church today (I am Episcopalian), and for the first time encountered two people who partook of the bread but refused the wine. They were in the same family--father and daughter--but the mother and sons all took both. I'm a bit flummoxed, having not encountered this before, so I thought I would ask here, since I know we have people from many different Christian backgrounds. (There are several Catholics who come to our church.) Does anyone know? Willing to take a guess?
post #2 of 44
Grape allergy? No idea.
post #3 of 44
I've not taken the wine when I had a cold, so as not to get other parishioners sick.
post #4 of 44
My mother will not dip bread in the grape juice if communion is done by intinction. She's afraid other people's fingers have touched the juice, therefore contaminating it.
post #5 of 44
Recovering alcholics don't take the wine at my church.

And I attended a church a few times and the wine was so gross I couldn't take it.
post #6 of 44
I was going to say that, too. 12-Steppers manage to find religious ways around wine in every religion.

(Grape juice is a biggie.)
post #7 of 44
In Poland, Catholics don't take wine - just the host. Only the priest drinks the wine. On special occassions, like communion or confirmation, they dip the host in the wine.

In the Catholic Church I went to, growing up in America, not everyone took the wine either. I'd say it was 50/50.

Personally, I never took the wine because I have a slight germ phobia and in all the Catholic Churches I went to, they served the wine from one goblet - to everyone. All they did was wipe with a napkin. To me, it seemed kind of ... well, not sanitary.

In a Baptist church I went to once, they served grape juice in individual cups - I partook of that. Individual cups - GREAT idea. One goblet - not happening (for me). But, again, the germ thing gets to me. I'm that person in the public bathroom who touches everything through paper towels.
post #8 of 44
I grew up Catholic, and wine wasn't offered to everyone every week, so maybe they were confused. (Dad went one way with daugther, Mom went another with son.) Wine was only offered on "special occasions" when I was growing up. Served all from one goblet, which I always liked.
post #9 of 44
DH and I don't take the wine. We are Catholic. I guess because it was never offered when we were growing up, it just doesn't feel *right* to us somehow. I guess we're old fogies in a way.
post #10 of 44
I believe the Catholic Church teaches that the body, blood, soul, and divinity of Jesus are all entirely present in both species.

Alcoholics are likely to refuse the wine/precious blood and those with Celiac are likely to skip the host/body.

HTH
post #11 of 44
Catholic Celiacs can't have the wine either - the priest always puts a piece of host in it before "serving".
post #12 of 44
I'm Catholic - "germs" never seemed like good reason to refuse the Lord when you consider that Catholics believe that that IS ACTUALLY God, but most educators - schools, CCD, RCIA, etc, teach that it is fine to take just the Host. The wine/Blood is not even offered at some churches/large services, and I'd say about 1 in 5 receive at mass.

Funny to me the way that family divided, because my dad and I always receive the Blood and my mom and brother skip it.
post #13 of 44
Some wines apparently use casein (a milk protein) as part of the filtering process, something like that. There is another relatively common allergen that's sometimes used in wine manufacturing, I forget which because it's not one of ours. People very sensitive to milk (or whatever that other one is--I almost think fish??) need to be careful which types of wine they consume (that assumes they know what's in the host and it's okay).
post #14 of 44
In my church (Orthodox) it wouldn't be possible to take one and not the other. Small pieces of the bread are mixed together with the wine in the chalice, and fed to the communicant on a little spoon.
post #15 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishmommy View Post
Catholic Celiacs can't have the wine either - the priest always puts a piece of host in it before "serving".
At our church, the priest puts that bit into only the priest goblet, so that celiacs can partake of the wine as well. I think it's a really thoughtful thing to do.
post #16 of 44
Ours puts it in both. But the celiac in my family (dd) "doesn't believe" any more, so doesn't go up.
post #17 of 44
Thread Starter 
This has been really fascinating. All I knew about Catholic Communion before this was that you can't take it unless you are in good standing with the church.

We have bread & wine communion every single Sunday; we call our service after the Eucharist, in fact. There's not a different goblet for the priest; we all drink from the same one. It's a rather democratic thing.

As for the germ issue...Honestly, you're a lot more likely to catch something from the Peace beforehand (wait, do Catholics have that?) than from the communal cup.
post #18 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sagesgirl View Post
As for the germ issue...Honestly, you're a lot more likely to catch something from the Peace beforehand (wait, do Catholics have that?) than from the communal cup.
Yup. And both my kids refuse to shake hands with anyone. I wish I could refuse!
post #19 of 44
I grew up Catholic and in my 20+ years of attending mass, I have never seen the wine offered to the congregation.
post #20 of 44
A close family member is a recovering alcoholic, and never takes the wine.
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