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What work does your dh/dp do that enables you to be a SAHP? - Page 2

post #21 of 276
Dh is a firefighter
post #22 of 276
Carpenter building custom homes.
Soon to be unemployed, unfortunately, due to the state of the economy.
I started a home-based business venture recently, and I hope it helps.
post #23 of 276
My husband is director of consulting services at a major computer firm in the Bay Area. His work pays well, but the cost of living in the Bay Area is very high so we output a lot of money each month as well. He works very long hours and is not home till after 9:00 each night (he leaves about 7:30 each morning) and he does a lot of work after he gets home on his laptop. Sometimes he goes in on Sundays to catch up as well. He does love his job, though--so that part is a positive. Sometimes it leaves me holding too much responsibility at home, as I do virtually all the housework and childcare from morning till night. I even do typical "husband" jobs like taking out the garbage and yard care. We have one child with special needs and she requires a lot of patience and care with her homework after school, and sometimes I wish I had more support. We don't have any family in the area, so I really don't get a break, either.

When I read about husbands that get home at 6:00 or 7:00 I think how lucky that is for the family, but can't really imagine it because we have never had that. On the weekends my husband will help out if I ask him specifically, but he doesn't typically ever help with anything on his own.

I am now considering going back to work part time while the kids are in school subbing with the school district, but I am not sure I can handle one more thing on my plate. We could use the extra money to save for college, as my son just started high school. My husband can't and won't change anything with his schedule, so it would be up to me to figure out how I am going to take care of everthing I do now and work as well.
post #24 of 276
My husband is a chef. We make well under $50,000 a year.

I've always SAH. It was a priority for both of us. We just made it happen. We were teen parents, and we both wanted to "do it right" so we just buckled down and made it happen.
post #25 of 276
He is a millwright. He has worked with the same company since he was a teenager. He will be starting his electrician apprentiship within the next year.

He has an internal drive to work. He has also done weekend jobs as a carpenter. On his holiday's he works odd jobs. When he has nothing to do with his hands he kinda goes batty.

There is construction going on in our area. He decided to go and pick out large stones to line our driveway. Lifting and moving those stones almost knocked him off his feet. But it gave him about 2-3 days work and that made him happy.
post #26 of 276
My hubby is a support analyst for a software company.
post #27 of 276
I think being able to stay at home depends on several factors including the dedication to make it happen, the area you live, how frugal you can be, how many kids you have, and what life has brought you before, etc. etc.

But anyway, my DH is an accountant with the government. His salary is pretty good but I am more thankful for other benefits of working for the federal government, including eight hour days. I'm sure he would be working much longer days if he was still in the private sector.
post #28 of 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by happyhats View Post
I think for a lot of women it's not about whether their husbands had "lucrative" jobs, at least not from what I've read on these boards.
:

DH works construction. But it's a commitment we made (for me to SAH). As long as DH doesn't get hurt or sick and cannot physically work I will be a SAHM, even if it takes sacrifice. Honestly though, if you're clever/careful one income can be better than two (depending on the situation). I'll probably save our family more by being a SAHM than I could earn our family outside the home.
post #29 of 276
Dh works as a civilian doing military intelligence.

Up until May he was in the military as an E-5 doing the same thing and we did OK on just his paycheck since we got "free" housing, insurance, etc. Plus he deployed often and you get lots of extra pays and such plus tax free pay when they are over seas.

Now he's a civilian doing the same job and making about $40K more a year but we're in a much higher COL area and we have to pay for housing and insurance...we're still doing better than we were but it's not as much of a jump as one would expect with that type of pay raise.

I used to do intelligence as well so if we ever wanted to switch I could go work and he could be a SAHD. And yeah, sometimes it's tempting to go back to work and just roll in the dough but I'll wait until dd is a bit older.
post #30 of 276
IT for a government ministry.

It's less a question of how much he makes, but more a question of how much I can make at the moment, and almost all the money being eaten up by child care and other costs.
post #31 of 276
President of a software company he helped to found. He's no longer a partner, we sold earlier this year.
post #32 of 276
A contractor.
post #33 of 276
Dh works for a local park district in Natural Resources.

However, when he started out there, he didn't have the higher-up position he has now. He made about what you'd expect someone in parks to make.

It wasn't the field he was in per se that was allowing me to stay home. It was the fact that before kids when we both worked we saved for a very large down payment and bought a house with a mortgage that one modest paycheck could cover.
post #34 of 276
Financial analyst (for a major health insurance company
post #35 of 276
Quote:
I think for a lot of women it's not about whether their husbands had "lucrative" jobs, at least not from what I've read on these boards.
Yep. I was a SAHM when my dh was making $6.25/hour at a factory. He now works as a technician at a dialysis clinic and I believe his yearly pay before overtime totals something like $29,500. After overtime and bonuses, it's more like $31,000. We do live in an area with a reasonable COL, and that helps. But the big thing is, we live very, very frugally. I know many people in this same area who have a single income of double dh's income, but still feel like they couldn't survive without their second income. My parents know *doctors* who live in even lower COL areas who genuinely believe that they couldn't financially make it on a single doctor's income.
post #36 of 276
Quote:
He has an internal drive to work. He has also done weekend jobs as a carpenter. On his holiday's he works odd jobs. When he has nothing to do with his hands he kinda goes batty.

Lifting and moving those stones almost knocked him off his feet. But it gave him about 2-3 days work and that made him happy.
My dh is the same way. He will probably die working, 'cause he's never going to retire.

If he takes a well-deserved nap on a rare afternoon, he wakes up mad at himself muttering about how "lazy" he is and how he just "wasted" his day. If he gets holiday's off, he gets so antsy and crabby so that we are actually rather happy to kiss him and send him back to work when vacation's over.
post #37 of 276
dh is a teacher. take home pay is less than 40k per year. we just figured that since we both made about 25k right after college and lived extravagantly...that we could make about 35 and live frugally.

so far so good. and dh's income rises every year.
post #38 of 276
DH is the Sales Manager for a wholesale printer, hopefully soon-to-be the GM of the shop. I agree that it's not really a matter of income but a whole combination of factors. I've always been a SAHM, even though 8 years ago DH made a 1/5 of what he earns now.
post #39 of 276
My husband is a software developer. He telecommutes, so we moved to an area with a cheaper housing market.
post #40 of 276
We saved up a lot of money ahead of time, when we both were working. That's how we've managed. We also paid off or kept debt very low, and live pretty frugally, although there's always room for improvement.

That's how we've pulled off having a SAHP. DH doesn't make enough to cover the bills, but he's close. Without savings, I never would have been able to be a SAHM.
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