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Bilingual French-English names for a boy - Page 2

post #21 of 41
DH and I had the same dilemma when we were expecting our child, since he's from Ontario and I'm quebecoise.

We settled on Tristan specifically b/c it could be pronounced well in English and French (and neither of us had negative associations with that name).

It ended up not getting used since we had a girl
post #22 of 41
*drags out family tree*

Laurent
Anatole (although that's not common nowdays)
Edouard
Camille
Maurice
Emile
Joseph
Octave
Celestine
Antoine
Louis
Pierre
Paul
Raoul
Sydney

Otto is really more Germanic, but if you like that variants would be Otello and Othello.

That's without getting into anything really obscure. Most people with obviously French names had an English version they used when the neighbourhood 'went American', so to speak. I'm told Uncle Laurent always said his name was Lawrence -- didn't know it was really Laurent until I got my hands on his birth record.
post #23 of 41
We are French-Canadian and Swiss. We have the additional fun of having German as an added language to worry about...

My son's name is Erik Olivier

I love the name Olivier, but it was far too close to my own name. Too much confusion.
post #24 of 41
I just met a lovely little boy named Mattias - a name which totally works in both languages, and is "normal" with a touch of uncommon. I'm a fan. Too bad DH is dead set against any name that starts with "Matt" (I also like Matteo).
Oh, and I looked up the meaning of Xavier. If you like the name, don't look up the meaning. I don't know who comes up with these meanings! Completely ridiculous. Definitely not using that name!
post #25 of 41
Thread Starter 
Wow! Thanks for all the suggestions!
post #26 of 41
Thank you for this thread! I'm also looking for names that'll work well in both languages. I've added a couple of names to my list from those mentioned above.

A couple of names that we're considering that I didn't see were Anton and Rhys. I think Rhys would get pronounced the same in either language anyway!
post #27 of 41
I know a couple of guys who grew up and live in the US whose mother is French. Their names are Alex (Alexandre) and Georges.

I think if you love the name Alexander then go for it. er, re, what's the difference really?
post #28 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by selkat View Post
Oh, and I looked up the meaning of Xavier. If you like the name, don't look up the meaning. I don't know who comes up with these meanings! Completely ridiculous. Definitely not using that name!

Your comment inspired me to look that up again, so I did a little search. One of the meanings was "the new house" for Spanish or Basque (huh?!). But the Arabic meaning is "bright" or "splendid" which I think is kind of nice.

We liked the name Marius at one point, but it was the same thing - we looked up the meaning and dropped that name. I think it was "warlike" or something crazy. Other meanings I've seen for it have just been "male," which isn't so bad.
post #29 of 41
I've never heard of Garion. What a great name!

My son's name is Xavier, which sounds a lot like Alexander, actually -- We say EX -ay-vee-er at home in English, and French family prounounce it Zah-vee-ay. Love it both ways.

ALso like Stephane, and Andre

ETA cross-posted with Rose-Roget. We used Xavier because we liked the meaning of "new house" which we took as starting a new lineage, breaking with tradition. Also liked the Arabic meaning. And the association with St. Francis Xavier. Never found any negative meanings for Xavier in any baby books we checked.
post #30 of 41
My DH is Jacques. No English speakers can EVER get it. We have to use Jacque Cousteau as an example. So don't pick Jacques! the most common slaughter is Jack-kwis.
post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aubergine68 View Post
We used Xavier because we liked the meaning of "new house" which we took as starting a new lineage, breaking with tradition.
Oh, I like that interpretation! I was thinking way too surface-level for the "new house" bit.
post #32 of 41
My dh is from France, and I'm from Canada (English and French background).
Needless to say we get in some pretty heated linguistic debates. Anyway, when we chose ds's name, we decided to look for a name that had NO English or French background. Also, we chose a name that was easy to decipher phonetically in both languages, and pronounced the same way in both (this effectively eliminated 99% of all names, but also all our French/English wars).
By the way, ds's name is Kanoa (ah, as you an see in my siggy). It's hawanian for "free". (as in, "free as a bird", not "given away for no money")
Dh's name is Guillaume, which is impossible to say (apparently) and technically translates to William, which he's none too fond of... names are tricky.
post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by selkat View Post
We're in the same boat with the names. I love Xavier, but as the french speaker, didn't realize that the english form of this name really emphasizes the 'X'. I had thought it was pronounced more along the lines of Zavier in english. It's still up in the air.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aubergine68 View Post
My son's name is Xavier, which sounds a lot like Alexander, actually -- We say EX -ay-vee-er at home in English, and French family prounounce it Zah-vee-ay. Love it both ways.

.

That's interesting! I'm anglo, but I've only ever heard Xavier pronounced Zay-vee-er. I wonder if it's an American thing (I'm Canadian)?

I know a Gregoire who goes by Greg now that he's grown. That's a nice one.

I love Sebastien.

Others:

Daniel
Andre (makes me think of Andre the Giant tho...)
Lionel
Robert
Marc
Christian
Charles
Benoit (you could call him Ben)
post #34 of 41
oooh. Benoit!
The "new house" definition of Xavier really did turn me off, but I hadn't thought of it as new beginning or anything beyond the superficial. I don't know that I'll be able to sway DH at this point though. He's pretty settled on the names we've short listed for boys.
post #35 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by mammastar2 View Post
That's interesting! I'm anglo, but I've only ever heard Xavier pronounced Zay-vee-er. I wonder if it's an American thing (I'm Canadian)?

I know a Gregoire who goes by Greg now that he's grown. That's a nice one.

)
I'm Canadian, too

He gets Zay-vee-er, too, but dh and I are also comic book fans from way back and we pronounce it like Professor Charles Xavier from the X-Men. Because we can, lol!

His little brother calls him Zay-zure, and his friends are starting to call him "Zave".

Benoit is a great name. We have a Gregoire in the family, love that one too.
post #36 of 41
Our son's name is Lucas, works in both languages.
post #37 of 41
DH's family is French, we decided to give this baby a French name- Lucien Gabriel. Though in keeping with the Italian names our other boys have, he'll probably have the nickname "Luca".
post #38 of 41
Why don't you want to change the spelling ?
If you like the name Alexander, I don't think that changing two letters would change anything for your son even more since most of the names that have the same spelling in French and English don't have the same pronunciation.

To tell the truth, it's something I hadn't ever thought about (we have Greek, French and English here as I'm Greek-Belgian and my husband American). When my husband came up with the name Nicholas and, yes, I thought "oh, that's nice, that's a name who exists and sounds good to me in the three languages" but it's not the reason why I accepted it. (by the way..; he decided a few months ago that if the baby is a boy, it will be spelled Nikolas to look more Greek ) I picked the girl's name, Joyce, and I have no idea how that will be pronounced in Greek but, well, I'm sure we'll find a way to write it
You know, my name is Electra in French ans Ilektra in Greek, having different pronunciations of my name never bothered me

(and now I'm really curious to hear how you pronounce Xavier in English :-D )
post #39 of 41
I like Axel.
post #40 of 41
My son is Emilio- I think the French version is Emil. I remember it from Willa Cather's O Pioneers! book...
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