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Dual citizenship for mexican/american babies?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I have two kids that are half mexican and another one on the way. Looking for links/ideas etc on whether or not my children can get dual citizenship and how I'd go about doing that. thanks!
post #2 of 23
I'd get in touch with the Mexican Embassy and ask about what paperwork you have to file for citizenship. I am fairly certain our friends have both Mexican and US citizenship, but I don't remember how they did it.
post #3 of 23
From what I understand the US does not officially recognize dual citizens. My dh is an immigrant from India, now a US citizen, and they made him choose US and renounce his Indian citizenship. That does not mean that another country would not recognize dual citizenship, such as Mexico, but the US won't recognize it.
post #4 of 23
It is possible to have dual citizenship (mexican/american). I have been meaning to do it for my daughter (I am mexican, we live in the US, she was born in the US) but haven't got around to it because our closest mexican consulate is a few hours away in New York City. Apparently, it is easier to do this in a consulate than in Mexico, or at least I haven't figured out the way to do it during my trips to Mexico yet.

Anyway, here is a link with relevant information. It is in Spanish and specific to the state of New York, but I'm sure you can find the webpage for consulates in other states.

http://www.sre.gob.mx/nuevayork/

GO to the link labeled as "Registro Civil" in the left hand vertical menu to find information specific to your question and the procedure you'd need to follow.

I hope this helps!
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post
From what I understand the US does not officially recognize dual citizens. My dh is an immigrant from India, now a US citizen, and they made him choose US and renounce his Indian citizenship. That does not mean that another country would not recognize dual citizenship, such as Mexico, but the US won't recognize it.
It doesn't matter that the USA doesn't recognize it, they (the USA) can't take your citizenship of another country away. I know tons of people that hold US citizenship in addition to another country. Recognition, really doesn't matter as long as you maintain your citizenship in said country/countries. You must, however, ALWAYS enter the USA on your American passport iirc. I can't remember why, but it was issue for friends of ours with a dual daughter.

My mum got got her American citizenship and they didn't make her renounce her Canadian citizenship.
post #6 of 23
If you become a naturalized American, you have to renounce your other citizenships. If you are born an American citizen you can also be citizen of another country.

You should be able to register your DC with the Mexican Embassy to get their Mexican citizenship attested to. I live on the US /Mexican border and I can assure you it is possible to have both!
post #7 of 23
DD is a dual citizen- Italian and American. She was born in the US and we currently live in the US. We had to translate her birth certificate and paternity statement into Italian and send them to the embassy in NYC. THen they sent them to the appropriate place in Italy who put her on the books as a citizen and we then got the document stating that she had been registered. We now have to go get her passport. However the consulate is several hours away and we both have to go in person with her and they have weird hours, so we haven't done it yet.
post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marylizah View Post
If you become a naturalized American, you have to renounce your other citizenships. If you are born an American citizen you can also be citizen of another country.

You should be able to register your DC with the Mexican Embassy to get their Mexican citizenship attested to. I live on the US /Mexican border and I can assure you it is possible to have both!
No, you do not. My mum just became a naturalized American about 2 weeks ago, she did not have to renounce her Canadian citizenship.

Quote:
Although naturalizing citizens are required to undertake an oath renouncing previous allegiances, the oath has never been enforced to require the actual termination of original citizenship.
They have you read a line, it has precisely ZERO effect on your dual citizenship.
post #9 of 23
Yes I remember him taking that oath. If you take that oath, is it not dishonest to not intend to follow it? If you have dual citizenship can you join the military of the other country and fight against the US for example? Or if you are arrested, does one country have more rights over prosecution or amnesty than the other one?

To compound matters for dh, India does not allow non-Indian citizens to own land in India. In order for dh to own land or inherit his father's properties when he passes away, he has to have a Person of Indian Origin card (for spouses, children or grandchildren of Indian citizens). You can then own land and businesses but not vote or run for office, etc. Because of the British Colonization, India is very firm that only Indians can own land there. That is one reason dh waited and thought for a couple of years before giving up his Indian citizenship.
post #10 of 23
DS is a dual citizen (Philippines and US).

I had to register his birth in the Philippine embassy in order for him to be recognized as Filipino. He is a dual citizen based on the fact that his mother is a Philippine citizen and his father is a US citizen. That makes him natural born citizen of both countries (I think).

However in MY case, if I decide to pursue US citizenship, the moment I get naturalized as a US citizen, my Philippine citizenship is considered denounced (by the Philippines). I can then apply to have my Philippine citizenship retained in order for me to have dual citizenship. If I don't apply for retention of citizenship, then I will only be a US citizen.
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post
Yes I remember him taking that oath. If you take that oath, is it not dishonest to not intend to follow it?
Actually it was declared unconstitutional to require people to give up citizenship of another country, iirc and no I don't think it's dishonest. I don't think the USA or any other country has the right to dictate where you can be a citizen of. Of course if you are a citizen of another country and they have say, mandatory military service you run that gamut as well. Your husband didn't HAVE to give up his Indian citizenship. I understand if he wanted to but, it is NOT required and I would never do it.

Most people will never have their allegiances tested in such a manner. It's simply a matter of having a choice and maintaining ties to your homeland, especially in the case where your family resides there. I wouldn't want to be prevented from staying in my own country, in an emergency where I had to take care of sick or elderly relatives for example.
post #12 of 23
Quote:
I don't think the USA or any other country has the right to dictate where you can be a citizen of.
Of course not. They cannot force him to be a citizen of the US rather than India. However if he is going to accept US citizenship he needs to abide by the conditions that go along with it. If he doesn't like those conditions then he doesn't have to become a citizen. No one forced him. I do think the US has the right to make conditions to becoming a citizen including renouncing other citizenship. I don't necessarily agree with this requirement, but they do have a right to make whatever rules they want as long as they make those rules clear to everyone.

It's like a driver's license. No one's going to force you to drive a car but if you do, you must promise to follow the traffic rules. If you don't like the rules, then don't get a license and drive a car. Use another form of transportation. Okay, probably way oversimplified.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post
Of course not. They cannot force him to be a citizen of the US rather than India. However if he is going to accept US citizenship he needs to abide by the conditions that go along with it. If he doesn't like those conditions then he doesn't have to become a citizen. No one forced him. I do think the US has the right to make conditions to becoming a citizen including renouncing other citizenship. I don't necessarily agree with this requirement, but they do have a right to make whatever rules they want as long as they make those rules clear to everyone.
Of course they have the right to make conditions when you apply for citizenship, however, renouncing your citizenship of your homeland is unnecessary and ridiculous, IMO. Obviously others feel the same way or they'd be prosecuting people who have dual citizenship, which really would be asinine. How is it any different from a child who has dual citizenship?

Quote:
Originally Posted by USAmma View Post
It's like a driver's license. No one's going to force you to drive a car but if you do, you must promise to follow the traffic rules. If you don't like the rules, then don't get a license and drive a car. Use another form of transportation. Okay, probably way oversimplified.
I think this is a totally irrelevant example. You are born abroad. You are a *insert nationality*. You shouldn't have to give up WHO you are to be a citizen. You should be required to follow the laws of the country you reside in, period, but that has NOTHING to do with maintaining dual citizenship.

MY whole point in this thread is people are often told they MUST renounce their citizenship to their homeland in order to become a US citizen and this is FALSE. The US does not require you to hand over your passports. They don't recognize it which is fair enough... but, they will not TAKE your old citizenship from you. They have no LEGAL right to do so. Which is my point, no one should worry about having to formally renounce their citizenship, it's purely ceremonial.
post #14 of 23
I know many, many people who were naturalized within the last few years, and not one of them has given up their original citizenship.

It's actually an odd contradiction in the law. While the U.S. would like you to give up your original citizenship, they also never, ever want any other country to be able to force a U.S. citizen to give up theirs. And so they are sort of ambiguous about it on purpose. But they recognize that they can't force you to, and in your husband's situation I think he is entitled to keep it and get his inheritance! If he has only renounced his citizenship to the U.S. authorities, that should not be valid anyway. He would have to renounce it to Indian authorities as well.

I was born in Mexico to an American mother and have dual citizenship.

To the OP: Mexico makes a distinction between being a "citizen" and being a "national." I believe that one of them carries with it the right to vote and the right to own property, whereas the other doesn't, but does allow you to live and work in Mexico without being the spouse of a citizen. It was my understanding that since my children were born outside of Mexico, I can only give them "national" status, but not "citizen" status.

But I looked into that so long ago, that it's definitely a good idea to check the consulate site, or call them.
post #15 of 23
My dd1 has dual citizenship (Mexico-US) and eventually dd2 will too. For dd1 (born in US), we registered her in Dh's hometown and then brought that paper to the consulate in NYC so she could get her Mexican Passport (already had US Passport.

I've heard that the US allows dual-citizenship as long as the other country allows it.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by etoilech View Post
I don't think the USA or any other country has the right to dictate where you can be a citizen of.
If I wanted to become a citizen here in Denmark, I would be required to give up my US citizenship. It is not just saying a line in an oath, but I have to go to the US embassy and return with proof before they will grant me Danish citizenship. I'll agree with you that it's ridiculous, but a country can make stupid stipulations if they want to.

OTOH, DD is a dual. We just had to register her birth at the US embassy. It was very easy.
post #17 of 23
To the persn who already had a mexican passport for her dc....what form did you fill out or get from your dh hometown? I'm asuming it was in mexico right? I would like for my children to get a Mexican passport ..however they were both born here in the states and my DP was not present for the births...he was not allowed in the US at the time of there birth...thus his signature is not on the birth certificates...would this be an issue when trying to obtain mexican citizenship? There last name is that of my DP.
post #18 of 23
I have dual citizenship but not by choice. My father is from Iran and according to their laws I am also from Iran even though I've never been there. Would have to enter on an Iranian passport even though I hold a US passport. And, they wouldn't have to let me back out either. I'm thinking this may be the case with many Islamic nations.
post #19 of 23
To further muddy the waters, some countries will allow minor children to hold dual citizenship, but require them to choose one or the other at a certain age... off the top of my head, Japan does this.
post #20 of 23
For the OP: DH is from Mexico and we live in the US where both of our dds were born. We went to the closest Mexican embassy (1 hour away) and "registered" their births. From what I understand they can get Mexican passports and are Mexican nationals.
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